Cellular Visions: The Inner Life of a Cell

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    Oct 24, 2007 5:59 PM GMT
    I dont know which forum to put this in. It is an awesome animation of the activity inside a cell. I wish I knew what each of the actvities depicted were.

    Cellular Visions: The Inner Life of a Cell
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    Oct 24, 2007 7:22 PM GMT
    That's funny... most of my students couldn't care less, yet they're paying for the information.
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    Oct 24, 2007 7:24 PM GMT
    Damn. looks like I was a few years to late. Maybe if I had this, I wouldn't have dumped premed.
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    Oct 24, 2007 7:25 PM GMT
    Do you teach at Harvard, Mindgarden?

    Whom do you teach and why wouldn't they be interested in something like this?
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    Oct 24, 2007 9:06 PM GMT
    wow that was amazing, watching the RNA Repilacte and the amazing functions of a cell that we take for granted.
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    Oct 24, 2007 10:16 PM GMT
    Hahvahd? LOL. Not nearly enough piercings or tattoos for that. Guest-lectured at Princeton a couple of times though. I seem to teach for three or four semesters, then not for a year or two, depending on how delusional I get.

    When I go through that freshman cell-biology stuff, it's usually for pre-med and nursing students. Most of them have a disturbing lack of interest in biology. Those who do get interested in it tend to change their major.

  • GQjock

    Posts: 11648

    Oct 25, 2007 10:45 AM GMT
    I'm a big Science Wonk... I love all this stuff
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    Oct 25, 2007 4:31 PM GMT
    If you want to learn more about what is going on in this video I suggest you watch the slow version of it with voice over at http://multimedia.mcb.harvard.edu/media.html

    This is a fantastic video especially for those studying cellular biology. When I took a course at university a long time ago we had to visualize all this from just 2 dimensional models of what scientists thought structures looked like. The only thing I recognized was the mitochondria. We have come a long way.

    As far as what forum this should have been put under, I think its present location is fine as it might be of some interest to PWA's in the respect that a view of how complicated a cell is on an atomic level can lead to some understanding of the difficulty in developing a vaccine can be. Also, they can look at this video with great encouragement because the development of this video is a considerable advancement in the understanding of cellular mechanisms on a atomic level.
  • DiverScience

    Posts: 1426

    Oct 25, 2007 6:19 PM GMT
    Lipid rafts (even if they don't exist)

    Actin and microtubule formation and depolymerization.

    Myosin walking a vesicle down the microtubule.

    A bunch of cytoskeletal stuff.

    Clathrin coats forming.

    Translation of RNA.

    Peptide synthesis.

    Vesicle budding.

    Golgi budding.

    Vesicle fusion.



    Very very very cool!
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    Oct 25, 2007 7:33 PM GMT
    Yes, this is very cool. But I wonder how useful it really is to someone who has not yet gone through the effort of learning about all of these processes. Or drilling down to the evidence for why we think some of these molecules work in a particular way. In other words, I'm not sure how one could effectively use such a video in the classroom.

    I was once firmly on the techno-bandwagon. There are few things that I hate more than standing in front of a class of sleepy students, writing on a chalkboard. However, the sad fact is that sitting and looking at pretty pictures, or even reading prepared on-line lecture notes, is far too passive an exercise to stimulate much learning. Given the same batch of material, the more technology used to present it, the lower the overall class exam scores. (And yes, sadly, with much effort I have done both this experiment and its reciprocal.)

    I still think that learning can be improved by use of information technology, but it has to be an active - not a passive - experience.

    I dunno. Maybe if it was a video game?
  • DiverScience

    Posts: 1426

    Oct 25, 2007 7:39 PM GMT
    Very useful, mindgarden.

    VERY.

    I just posted this to several non-science friends, and a whole slew of them suddenly responded with, "Holy crap, THIS is why you do science? No wonder?!" And suchlike comments.

    Things like this give non-scientists something without jargon to grab on. Something they can see and go, "Oh, that's why we need to study it." Because it's beautiful and complex and there's so much going on.


    From my science friends I got several, "Wow, thanks. Suddenly I remember why I do this."

    And most recently: "Wow, that is truly stunning. In the nitty-gritty world of everyday lab work it is easy to forget that what we are working with are actually living, breathing, ever-changing entities, and it is good to be reminded."

    Things like this are good, both for scientists and non-scientists. Maybe not as direct teaching tools, but as non-verbal windows into an unseen world that becomes banal if viewed from day to day through the lense of lab-work and incomprehensible to everyone else.
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    Oct 25, 2007 10:41 PM GMT
    Well, I am interested in this because of my personal trainer recently bringing up the subject of cellular communication and glycoproteins.

    Thanks Alexander 7 for the link to the audio version!
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    Oct 25, 2007 11:11 PM GMT
    Wait wait, lipid rafts might not exist. Sources! I must have sources!

    I'm finishing my master's in genetics and cell bio. I stress the genetics more, but have taken and read too much cell bio.