THE TANNING BOOTH: Can cost as much as a gym membership: Worth it?

  • HndsmKansan

    Posts: 16311

    Mar 31, 2009 2:43 PM GMT
    I have a friend in Oklahoma City that spends as much money per month as
    my gym membership... on tanning. When we talked about that and my contention I'd never spend my money that way and a gym membership was far more important.

    His response, "I have to look good to be able to go and work out"..

    I about fell over..

    So would you spend as much money on tanning as you do the gym?
    Would you spend anything? Do you tan?
  • silverfox

    Posts: 3178

    Mar 31, 2009 3:28 PM GMT
    Yes the tanning bed is definitely worth it. One of the most cost effective ways to speed up the aging process. icon_biggrin.gif
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Mar 31, 2009 3:29 PM GMT
    We-e-ell. A man with a tan looks hot.

  • Timbales

    Posts: 13993

    Mar 31, 2009 3:32 PM GMT
    For me, a tan isn't worth the health risks in general and the ones specific to me.
  • HndsmKansan

    Posts: 16311

    Mar 31, 2009 3:47 PM GMT
    Lost_And_Found saidWe-e-ell. A man with a tan looks hot.



    Then put on sunscreen, strip your shirt and go mow your lawn...

    icon_biggrin.gif
  • Menergy_1

    Posts: 737

    Mar 31, 2009 3:55 PM GMT
    That must be a LOT of tanning to equal a gym membership cost/month!

    Nevertheless: yes, tanning beds can help in moderate use with skin conditions like psoriasis (speaking from personal experience) during cold months when I can't get outdoors and expose more than face and hands to the sun.

    UVA rays and some cortisone creams/Vitamin D compounds are effective in controlling my own psoriasis (no cure available still) -- others' mileage may vary, of course.

    UVB is more the culprit in aging and skin cancer -- sun screen helps reduce exposure to those rays.

    That said, it's only a few minutes per session and was dermatologist approved.


    PS: HndsmKansan said: "Then put on sunscreen, strip your shirt and go mow your lawn..." Ummm, we don't HAVE lawns here! lol
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Mar 31, 2009 4:00 PM GMT
    I hear that tanning beds are worse than being out in the sun. And sunscreen increases the risk of melanoma.

    I agree a golden tan looks great, but I would be concerned about the health risks getting one. I think people, like Latinos, who are born with naturallly golden skin are really lucky.

    Maybe medicine will figure out a way to stimulate melanin production without having to tan via sunlight or tanning booths.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Mar 31, 2009 4:17 PM GMT
    Not a good idea for your skin. And when I look at a white guy who's heavily tanned, I think how prematurely old he's going to look, if he doesn't already.

    But one time I did use a tanning bed. I'd begun a long-distance relationship with my future partner, and he mentioned how hot he thought Speedo tan lines looked, really turned him on.

    I'd had no tan lines for years, being a naturist and using sun-block anyway, but it was winter and at the moment I was without any tan. So I went to a tanning salon and put on 2 Speedos I had for indoor pools, one over the other, to make sure nothing underneath darkened. (In my early 50s I could still wear a Speedo, honestly) I also totally covered my face with a heavy towel.

    I got my Speedo line after a few sessions, and he was thrilled next time he saw me (naked). But I'll never do that again.
  • Rookz

    Posts: 947

    Mar 31, 2009 4:34 PM GMT
    Just buy the over the counter tan-in-a-can. It's a two for one deal: it moisterizes and gradually tans your skin.

    Tanning beds are the bane of vanity; makes you look good but their goes your youthful appearance.
  • ArmsandLegs

    Posts: 125

    Mar 31, 2009 5:15 PM GMT
    I pay the same for tanning as I do for my gym membership... which is nothing. My gym membership is included in my tuition, and my good friend manages a tanning salon, so she comps me!
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    Mar 31, 2009 5:21 PM GMT
    HndsmKansan said
    Lost_And_Found saidWe-e-ell. A man with a tan looks hot.



    Then put on sunscreen, strip your shirt and go mow your lawn...

    icon_biggrin.gif


    Hahaha, but what would the neighbours think?

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Mar 31, 2009 5:44 PM GMT
    It is NOT worth it. I am totally against tanning, as you can tell from my pale vampire like skin (teehee). Seriously though, tan guys can be hot, yeah, but if it isn't a natural tan then they're going to age way early. The older I get the more I appreciate lighter skin on caucasians.

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Mar 31, 2009 5:48 PM GMT
    I've never been a really big tanner, mostly because my Irish background makes me burnnnn. Who wants to fake and bake anyway? Just go outside and be active, you'll get tanned that way too.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Mar 31, 2009 5:48 PM GMT
    The last I checked, we're struck with UV rays for free daily.
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    Mar 31, 2009 5:54 PM GMT
    AbFab1 saidNevertheless: yes, tanning beds can help in moderate use with skin conditions like psoriasis (speaking from personal experience) during cold months when I can't get outdoors and expose more than face and hands to the sun.

    UVA rays and some cortisone creams/Vitamin D compounds are effective in controlling my own psoriasis (no cure available still) -- others' mileage may vary, of course.

    UVB is more the culprit in aging and skin cancer -- sun screen helps reduce exposure to those rays.

    That said, it's only a few minutes per session and was dermatologist approved


    Actually, UVA rays are aging, and UVB are burning. Whether sunlight helps dermatological conditions independently of Vitamin D's effects is still very controversial (my mom's a dermatologist, and she thinks UV-therapy advocates are crazy), so you might just want to try the topical compounds and supplements to see if they help. Also, other wavelengths of light can help rosacea and IIRC psoriasis... it's either red light therapy or blue light, I forget which.

    ~~~~~

    Why would I pay money to accelerate my aging process? Never mind that I've already had melanoma, why would I want to look older? icon_neutral.gif
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Mar 31, 2009 7:06 PM GMT
    My gym offfers free tanning beds. Yay!
  • HndsmKansan

    Posts: 16311

    Mar 31, 2009 7:11 PM GMT
    Lost_And_Found said
    HndsmKansan said
    Lost_And_Found saidWe-e-ell. A man with a tan looks hot.



    Then put on sunscreen, strip your shirt and go mow your lawn...

    icon_biggrin.gif


    Hahaha, but what would the neighbours think?



    I strip my shirt to cutoffs and mow my lawn that way all the time.....
    Not sure what the neighbors think.....
  • Webster666

    Posts: 9217

    Mar 31, 2009 8:14 PM GMT
    A nice tan really shows off your muscles.
    At a gym where I used to go, they had tanning beds.
    In the Winter time, I used them maybe once every week or two.
    It wasn't expensive, and certainly not within a mile of the cost of a gym membership.
    Now, I just try to get a Summer tan..............................outdoors.
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    Mar 31, 2009 8:24 PM GMT
    Lost_And_Found saidHahaha, but what would the neighbours think?


    I can hear it all now.. "Hunny, Hunny come here, you have to see this, there is something pasty out on our neighbors lawn"
  • Anto

    Posts: 2035

    Mar 31, 2009 8:44 PM GMT
    Caslon9000 said
    Maybe medicine will figure out a way to stimulate melanin production without having to tan via sunlight or tanning booths.



    That's already happened but it's not available for people to use yet. It's called Melanotan II, weaker version Melanotan.
    It also has the side effect of causing sexual arousal, like guys having erections.

    Isn't a certain degree of tanning good for you though if you are exposed to the sun? I mean tanning brought about from natural gradual exposure to the sun like through outdoor activities. The whole purpose of skin becoming tan is to build a barrier against harmful uv rays. If you are really white or light skinned, unless you put sunblock on during sun exposure, it seems like that would be more harmful to your skin than having some natural tanning built up to help block harmful rays.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Mar 31, 2009 8:48 PM GMT
    Sunscreen controversy

    Sunscreen protects against two common forms of skin cancer, squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) and basal cell carcinoma (BCC), and several sunscreen ingredients protect against tumor development in photocarcinogenicity tests in mice. However, there is some evidence, largely arising from correlational studies and in vitro experiments, that sunscreen use may be linked to increased risks of malignant melanoma, a rarer but more deadly form of skin cancer. It has also been linked to Vitamin D deficiency.[1] The broad areas of concern are:

    potentially carcinogenic properties of some sunscreen ingredients
    Vitamin D deficiency caused by reduced exposure to ultraviolet light
    incomplete protection against the full ultraviolet spectrum combined with increased time spent in the sun

    This lead to a Sunscreen controversy within the academic community. It is known that some sunscreens only protect against UVB radiation, and not against the more dangerous UVA spectrum. A number of class-action lawsuits allege that sunscreen manufacturers misled consumers into believing that these products provided full sun protection. The vitamin D hypothesis is not as widely accepted but continues to generate scholarly debate. Most health authorities and medical associations have concluded that on the whole, sunscreen use is beneficial, but there is not yet a thorough consensus. ...
    Sunscreen ingredients can damage DNA
    Some sunscreen ingredients may damage cells when illuminated. [24] [25][26][27] PABA causes DNA damage in human cells.[28] PABA was banned as a sunscreen ingredient several years after these findings were published. Phenylbenzimidazole (PBI) causes DNA photodamage when illuminated while in contact with bacteria or human keratinocytes.[22][29][30]

    Some sunscreen ingredients generate Reactive oxygen species when exposed to UV-A,[31] which can increase carbonyl formation in albumin[32] and damage DNA. It is also well-known that DNA alterations are necessary for cancer to occur.

    Many sunscreen ingredients generate singlet oxygen under illumination.[33] Several popular UV-filters have been demonstrated to generate free radicals.[32]

    Kerry Hanson et al. have shown for the three sunscreen ingredients octocrylene, octylmethoxycinnamate, and benzophenone-3 that after the sunscreen chemicals had time to absorb into the skin the number of ROS and free radicals is higher for the sunscreen user than for the non-user.[21] Such an increase in ROS might increase the chance of melanoma, but this hypothesis has not been tested.

    DNA, in particular, is susceptible to damage caused by photo-excited compounds.[29]

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sunscreen_controversy#Sunscreen_ingredients_can_damage_DNA

    Personally, I think the best protection is natural protection. Let the body develop a tan slowly. Start in the Spring while the sun rays are still at angle so as not to be so strong. Only stay out for short periods of time at first. In the Summer, limit sun exposure to after 3 PM when the sun rays are at an angle and not so strong.
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    Mar 31, 2009 8:49 PM GMT
    Anto said
    Caslon9000 said
    Maybe medicine will figure out a way to stimulate melanin production without having to tan via sunlight or tanning booths.



    That's already happened but it's not available for people to use yet. It's called Melanotan II, weaker version Melanotan.

    It also has the side effect of causing sexual arousal, like guys having erections.

    Yes, I just read about that. It hasnt been approved yet. It should be interesting with it dual affects! .... icon_lol.gif
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Mar 31, 2009 9:33 PM GMT
    lilTanker said
    Lost_And_Found saidHahaha, but what would the neighbours think?


    I can hear it all now.. "Hunny, Hunny come here, you have to see this, there is something pasty out on our neighbors lawn"


    ... or something peeling.

    I once went for a tan and got refused on the basis I was already sunburnt. I'd literally only walked for 20 minutes in the sun to bring me out scarlet.

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Apr 01, 2009 12:55 AM GMT
    I don't spend a cent on tanning booths or lotions. I just swim laps, play some tennis, go running or cycling and get plenty of sun here in Arizona that way. If I lived in a cold climate I would maybe slap on some bronzer. I would look ghostly if I was too white.
  • styrgan

    Posts: 2017

    Apr 01, 2009 1:10 AM GMT
    I don't tan during the winter. There's something ultra-ridiculous about having that golden bronze color when it's below freezing out.

    But I do using a tanning salon 8 months a year - and I vary my exposure by season. During the summer, I use a high pressure bed and a stronger standup weekly - which ends up being $25/week. I usually spend about $200 a year on tanning lotions as well.

    My gym membership is covered by my employer, but my friend pays $85 a month for hers. So in actuality, if I were to tan all year around, I probably would end up spending MORE money on tanning than on my gym membership.