have you ever been to turkey(turkia)

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    Apr 04, 2009 12:02 PM GMT
    what are your impressions?
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    Apr 05, 2009 3:25 AM GMT
    I loved the three weeks I spent in Istanbul, 2002. I stayed with friends teaching English, living on the Asian side of the Bosphorus.

    The cultural differences on each side of the strait were quite a contrast. I will never forget playing soccer, drinking apple tea and the horrifying experience at the hamam.

    Turkey was the only place I could ever buy clothes right off the rack, which was quite an accomplishment for my disproportionate body. I haven't bought jeans since and am thinking about going back just to get new ones. Seriously.
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    Apr 05, 2009 11:06 AM GMT
    26mileman saidI loved the three weeks I spent in Istanbul, 2002. I stayed with friends teaching English, living on the Asian side of the Bosphorus.

    The cultural differences on each side of the strait were quite a contrast. I will never forget playing soccer, drinking apple tea andicon_smile.gif the horrifying experience at the hamam.icon_biggrin.gif

    Turkey was the only place I could ever buy clothes right off the rack, which was quite an accomplishment for my disproportionate body. I haven't bought jeans since and am thinking about going back just to get new ones. Seriously.
    give some details about HAMAM/TURKÄ°SH BATH
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    Apr 05, 2009 12:21 PM GMT
    Yes 26 would like to hear! Friend of mine went a few times and loved it. How is gay scene?
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    Apr 06, 2009 1:18 PM GMT
    obama is in turkey now.
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    Apr 08, 2009 1:44 PM GMT
    obama has left turkey
  • GQjock

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    Apr 08, 2009 2:35 PM GMT
    Yeah ....
    Beautiful country Beautiful men icon_biggrin.gif
    ?image=367&size=full

    wrestlers004finalCrop.jpg
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    Apr 10, 2009 3:57 PM GMT
    icon_razz.gif
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    Apr 11, 2009 5:00 AM GMT
    Some day
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    Apr 11, 2009 6:21 PM GMT
    I spent a week in Turkey in August, 2004 as an independent traveler on my way to the Olympic Games in Athens. I visited Istanbul, Selcuk (Ephesus), and Bodrum (Halicarnassus). Here are my honest observations.

    I'll give you the negative impressions first, so we can get past them.

    I don't enjoy traveling in a place where people constantly pester you to buy something. As an obvious foreigner in Istanbul you can't stand still on the street for three seconds without someone approaching you trying to sell you a carpet. It's annoying. The same can be said of many other beautiful places - Mexico, Bali, etc. In Turkey I appreciated the fact that the vendors at least had a sense of humor about it - they would joke with you, instead of just sell sell sell.

    Traveling around Turkey by bus, I was saddened to see all the half finished houses standing empty, because I knew what had happened - some builder had run off with the peoples' money. I had heard this was a problem but it seemed to be very widespread. Builders in the US are crooks too, but at least they usually finish the houses (eventually).

    Finally, I would not visit again in August. Way too crowded with awful tourists. This is not Turkey's fault - I would say the same about any place in Europe, and I would not visit there in August again either. But I had no choice on that trip, I couldn't tell the Greeks when to hold the Olympics.

    Now for the good stuff.

    I loved the way people would talk to you, about anything. I had many conversations with very friendly people in Istanbul, at restaurants and bars and just on the street (they weren't all selling carpets). When I arrived in Istanbul after a very long flight, the taxi driver first told me he was Kurdish, then said, "What do you think of George Bush?" I was tired and disoriented and I had no idea if Kurdish Turks (or Turkish Kurds) hated Bush or loved him so I just said, "I think we have had better presidents." He laughed and agreed, and then told me the street he was driving on is named for John F Kennedy.

    I was very impressed with the beauty of the country, and with the historical sites. In Istanbul, the Blue Mosque, the Agia Sophia Cathedral, Topkapi Palace, and the old cisterns were fabulous. Riding on an overnight bus, I was surprised to wake up and find that we were traveling through green, forested mountains - we usually picture Turkey as being dry and rocky. In two days I visited two of the sites of the original 7 Wonders of the World (the Temple of Diana at Ephesus and the Mausoleum of Halicarnassus). Neither is still standing but there are pieces remaining, and it was very special to visit those places. The Aegean coast is gorgeous, and I loved the relaxed lifestyle and very friendly people there.

    I wish I'd had a lot more time to spend in Turkey. There were many places I wanted to visit but just didn't have the time. I'll go back some day.
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    Apr 11, 2009 6:28 PM GMT
    if i had seen those pecs and nips on my street , they coudnt have returned to their country icon_twisted.gif
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    Apr 11, 2009 6:41 PM GMT
    I haven't yet been, but since I'm right next door in Armenia for the next year and a half, I plan on hitting Istanbul at some point.
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    Apr 11, 2009 6:55 PM GMT
    I enjoyed living there when I was growing up there on Incirlik AFB, which is an AirForce Base there. HAd lots of fun as a kid there from what I can remember.
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    Apr 11, 2009 7:04 PM GMT
    Guy101 saidI enjoyed living there when I was growing up there on Incirlik AFB, which is an AirForce Base there. HAd lots of fun as a kid there from what I can remember.
    that airbase is in Adana. we have a hibrit tv showgirl DEFNE JOY FOSTER whose father was a black american soldier in that airbase.
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    Apr 11, 2009 7:16 PM GMT

    I lived in Istanbul (Bebek) from 1992 til 1995 and loved it. Turkey is a country of stark contrasts: there is tremendous wealth and significant poverty; there are sleek modern buildings alongside ancient monuments; there is a devotion to Islam within a secular state and tolerance for other religions. In the large cities there are excellent restaurants and some of the best night clubs and dance clubs I've been too.

    I loved the food - lots of fresh vegetables, fish, lamb and great bread. There aren't a lot of brands of local wine, but what there is is very drinkable. And the local spirit - Raki is great (especially alongside some ripe melon and white cheese!)

    I've rarely met more hospitable, charming people. I worked hard to learn to speak Turkish and my efforts were always met with patience and enthusiasm.

    From Istanbul, there are decent beaches a couple of hours north on the Black Sea and breathtaking beaches on the Aegean and Mediterranean. I drove across the whole country twice and found it fascinating.

    About the only drawbacks I can think of are the winter air quality in Istanbul, which is awful because most people rely on coal for heat. The traffic around Istanbul can be pretty bad too.
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    Apr 11, 2009 7:16 PM GMT
    Right on. It's not too far from Istanbul. I remember going on a school trip down to the beach. it was a full day event.
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    Apr 11, 2009 7:30 PM GMT
    flieslikeabeagle said


    I've rarely met more hospitable, charming people. I worked hard to learn to speak Turkish and my efforts were always met with patience and enthusiasm.

    we turk think that we are underappreciated. and we are hungry for attention of the west. the reason of the patience you mentioned is this.
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    Apr 11, 2009 9:41 PM GMT
    turk said
    flieslikeabeagle said


    I've rarely met more hospitable, charming people. I worked hard to learn to speak Turkish and my efforts were always met with patience and enthusiasm.

    we turk think that we are underappreciated. and we are hungry for attention of the west. the reason of the patience you mentioned is this.


    I agree that Turks are often under-appreciated. I believe that comes from Turks being misunderstood. Turkey has had such a long history of being a crossroad and sometimes the center of cultures (e.g. The Ottoman empire) that it is a very complex and sometimes contradictory place. This can make it hard for some people - especially those who like to see things as neat, black and white, and easy to understand. Turkey is a predominantly Muslim country, but is an ally of Israel. The country struggles with religious fundamentalists on one side and violent ultra-nationalist secularists on the other - with the vast majority of Turks in the middle. Turkey has been a reliable NATO partner, but has not found anything like full-fledged acceptance by the EU (and within Turkey it's not a settled question whether membership would be a good thing).

    I always marveled at my colleagues (mainly western educated, BMW-driving, MBA's) who would dream of missing a weekend of shopping in the city's centuries old 'Egyptian' or 'Corn' market. I also marveled at the level of genuine love every Turk I know feels for their country.

    Personally, I find the country's complexity fascinating and humbling.
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    Apr 12, 2009 10:34 AM GMT
    flieslikeabeagle said
    turk said
    flieslikeabeagle said


    I've rarely met more hospitable, charming people. I worked hard to learn to speak Turkish and my efforts were always met with patience and enthusiasm.

    we turk think that we are underappreciated. and we are hungry for attention of the west. the reason of the patience you mentioned is this.


    The country struggles with religious fundamentalists on one side and violent ultra-nationalist secularists on the other - with the vast majority of Turks in the middle.

    well , i am one of those secular-nationalists. and i dont think we are violant
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    Apr 22, 2009 7:38 PM GMT
    spent a month in istanbul and along the aegean coast. spent some time sailing. could live there, happily. the people, food and history are exquisite.

    i see poverty here (in the US), as well...
  • cbrett

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    Apr 23, 2009 5:23 AM GMT
    with ANZAC day coming up this saturday 25th april it a great time to remenber our fullen soldiers and what a great country turkey is now
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    Apr 23, 2009 5:54 AM GMT
    My stay in Turkey was cut short by 9/11. I stayed the night in a hotel between the Blue Mosque and the Hagia Sophia. Unfortunately I ended up arriving after dark and leaving before sunrise. icon_sad.gif

    I'd like to go back but it's not in the cards in the near future.
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    May 17, 2009 3:47 PM GMT
    http://istanbulgay.com