TAKING MUTIVITAMINS BERFORE BED ?

  • BeachStud2014

    Posts: 343

    Apr 06, 2009 5:58 PM GMT
    Has anyone ever taken multi-vitamins before going to bed ?
    Is that safe ?
    What were the effects ?
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Apr 06, 2009 6:02 PM GMT
    None. Most studies show that multi-vitamins are a waste of money and do no good at all.

    Google it at The New England Journal of Medicine.

    The huge study came out last fall.
  • MikePhilPerez

    Posts: 4357

    Apr 06, 2009 6:03 PM GMT
    I think in the morning is the best time to take a multi-vitamin. Taking it before going to bed could keep you awake. Other than that, I can not see any danger in talking them at night.

    Why would you want to take them at night?
  • MikePhilPerez

    Posts: 4357

    Apr 06, 2009 6:04 PM GMT
    Triggerman saidNone. Most studies show that multi-vitamins are a waste of money and do no good at all.

    Google it at The New England Journal of Medicine.

    The huge study came out last fall.


    Who carried out the study?
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    Apr 06, 2009 6:16 PM GMT
    Multi-vitamins are expensive piss dye. You really don't need them unless your diet is deficient in some way. Use a program like FitDay to track your diet over a week and see if you are not getting enough of a vitamin or mineral.

    That said, you should always take vitamins with food.
  • Webster666

    Posts: 9217

    Apr 06, 2009 6:18 PM GMT
    Anybody who has a reasonably well balanced diet, shouldn't need a multi-vitamin (unless you have some kind of health problems). If you are taking one, I can't see that it would matter when you took it, as long as you were fairly consistent.

    I take C and E every day. And, I triple the C if I feel a cold coming on. And, I take a fish oil capsule every day. Some studies have shown that the E is worthless, but I'd rather err on the side of caution. I also take a Calcium tablet twice a week because I consume very few dairy products.
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    Apr 06, 2009 6:34 PM GMT
    My MRP shake has a lot of vitamins/minerals already. I only take additional calcium and vitamin c supplements.
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    Apr 06, 2009 6:39 PM GMT
    I read it in The New England Journal of Medicine. It was a very comprehensive study over a long term but I can't tell you much more. I just read it last fall and I know the conclusion but not the supporting data because I have never been a fan of vitamins so I did not save the article.

    JW
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    Apr 06, 2009 6:43 PM GMT
    I found that taking multivitamins in the afternoon or later interfered with my sleep. My sleep wasnt as sound for some reason.

    Also, I have discovered that multivitamins cause the skins to break around my fingernails....the skin just splits to the quick...no bleeding, but the openings sting. So, obviously, I have stopped taking multivitamins and just rely on lots of veggies, fruits, and nuts for my vitamins....plus FRS.
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    Apr 06, 2009 8:55 PM GMT
    Multivitamins should not cause problems taken at night. The only problem might be with sleep if there would be a stimulant like caffeine as an ingredient. You should check the label. Caslon mentioned that he had a sleep disturbance; so anything is possible.

    The NEJM has several articles about supplements
    The latest scientific evidence is that antioxidant vitamins do not prevent cancer or heart disease. Beta carotene may increase the risk for lung cancer. Folic acid may increase the risk of prostate cancer
    If you want antioxidant vitamins it is better to eat vegetables than take supplements
    Vitamin D and calcium is recommended in men to prevent osteoporosis just like in women

    The Mayo Clinic recommends vitamins for only the following conditions

    Don't eat well or consume less than 1,600 calories a day
    Are a vegetarian and don't substitute or complement your diet appropriately
    Are pregnant, trying to get pregnant or breast-feeding
    Are a woman who experiences heavy bleeding during your menstrual period
    Are a postmenopausal woman
    Have a medical condition that affects how your body absorbs, uses or excretes nutrients, such as chronic diarrhea, food allergies, food intolerance or a disease of the liver, gallbladder, intestines or pancreas
    Have had surgery on your digestive tract and are not able to digest and absorb nutrients properly