Matisyahu

  • DCEric

    Posts: 3713

    Apr 12, 2009 12:53 AM GMT
    If you pronounce it "Modest Yaho" you are close enough.

    Mathew Miller was born in 1979 and grew up in suburban Philly as a Reconstructionist Jew, but at the age of 16 he began a transformation that lead to him switching to Hasidim. For an understanding of the differance, I consider myself Reconstructionist, while some of the so called "Black Hats" would be Hasidic. The Hasidic movement is very in tune with using music as a means of spreading joy. He had always had a love of music as many suburban Americans do. He began to practice with with friends, took on a stage name, and in 2000 he was discovered. This is what the world received.



    Eric Clapton and the Police could have received the same introduction, with the minor change that I would be referring to Britain, instead of America- which isn't a big swap in the greater scheme of things. For some reason the combination of a full beard and payot with reggae seems like it should be a Mel Brooks skit that occurs in the middle of the History of the World Part 1. Perhaps it is because people are acutely aware of the historic tensions between Jews and Blacks within the New York City school system, even if they don't know that particular event was the one that kicked off those tensions. Instead it is a real manifestation of not judging a book by its cover and that mutual understanding is only as far away as a few lyrics and a good beat.

    Here are a few more songs for your listening pleasure.



    The best ones are disabled from embedding... watch them anyway.

    /Before a flame war ensues, I would like to ban any talking about The Conflict.
  • Bunjamon

    Posts: 3161

    Apr 12, 2009 3:54 AM GMT
    He's got a beautiful voice. My favourite track is his cover of the Police's "Message in a Bottle." I could listen to that song all day. He's really good in concert, too.

    And I'd pronounce it mah-dis yahoo icon_wink.gif
  • DCEric

    Posts: 3713

    Apr 12, 2009 4:10 AM GMT
    Bunjamon saidAnd I'd pronounce it mah-dis yahoo icon_wink.gif


    You should pronouce it that way, but I know enough people on here don't have English or Hebrew as a first language.
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    Apr 12, 2009 5:58 AM GMT
    An excellent concert -- if he comes through your town, you shoudn't miss it.

    The pronunciation isn't hard. If you don't have any background exposure to Hebrew, just think of all the times you've heard a world news report mention Netanyahu. Then replace the "net-anh" with "mah-dis". Simple.
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    Apr 12, 2009 6:03 AM GMT
    Are jews allowed to do that??? .... icon_eek.gif
  • ROYCE13

    Posts: 315

    Apr 12, 2009 7:01 AM GMT
    what is the thread about.

    Hasidic translates to "loving kindness"

    There is not one central Hasidic movement, but a collection of about a dozen major hasidic movements and about 3 dozen minor movements within the groups. Each movement is a bit different. Actually, the spreading of music is not popular, per thread statement, in the groups. They do have their own type of music though. This guy is just doing his own thing. Most hasidic groups just really keep to themselves and their community beyond work environments.
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    Apr 12, 2009 7:30 AM GMT
    Matisyahu Kicks Ass.


    This thread is filled with Win.
  • DCEric

    Posts: 3713

    Apr 12, 2009 12:51 PM GMT
    Caslon10000 saidAre jews allowed to do that??? .... icon_eek.gif


    Yes.
  • DCEric

    Posts: 3713

    Apr 12, 2009 12:55 PM GMT
    ROYCE13 saidThere is not one central Hasidic movement, but a collection of about a dozen major hasidic movements and about 3 dozen minor movements within the groups. Each movement is a bit different. Actually, the spreading of music is not popular, per thread statement, in the groups. They do have their own type of music though. This guy is just doing his own thing. Most hasidic groups just really keep to themselves and their community beyond work environments.


    All true statements, however, many outsiders look at this as a violation of those movements, when in fact this in no way breaks with the Hasidic traditions. Religious Jews tend to be viewed as outsiders as a group of people largely cut off from the world, such as the Amish. I am trying with this thread to show that is not the case. Similarly, groups that seemingly oppose one another, for whatever reason, can reach across those imagined boundaries (ie. the SC Judges in Iowa appointed by conservatives that reached across party lines to do what is right).
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    Apr 12, 2009 3:04 PM GMT
    ugh...I can't stand this guy. I hope this thread withers and dies.
  • DCEric

    Posts: 3713

    Apr 12, 2009 3:11 PM GMT
    tommysguns2000 saidugh...I can't stand this guy. I hope this thread withers and dies.


    If you thought that I was suggesting that everyone enjoys his music, you missed the point of this thread.