My doctor said bariatric surgery may be my only option.

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    Apr 16, 2009 9:33 PM GMT
    I think he's probably right. All of my efforts have been for shit so maybe this is what I need to do.
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    Apr 16, 2009 10:05 PM GMT
    Interesting... just last week, after reading one of your threads, I had the thought that your best bet would be surgery.

    Back in 2004, I took a Body Electric School course with a guy who was huge, probably bigger than you are. Since then, he had a gastric bypass, lost 170 pounds, and recently won Mr. Boston Leather 2009. When I see pictures of him today, I don't even recognize him. And, a friend of mine has a son who peaked at 700 pounds, had gastric bypass at 500 pounds, and is now down to around 325. So, it definitely can be a very successful method of losing weight.
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    Apr 17, 2009 12:51 AM GMT
    NoNameGuy saidI think he's probably right. All of my efforts have been for shit so maybe this is what I need to do.


    Here we go again.

    Sir, go see a professional. Explore your options. Folks want you to be successful, but, we can't do it here, being bytes. You need real people, and real effort, along with a plan for success.

    If surgery is your answer, go do it.

    If you absolutely can't make the effort on your own, well...there you go.

    Folks who have surgery often don't change their lifestyles and end up right back where they started. I've seen it time and again.

    You need to change your outlook, behavior, and methods. You need a plan for success. If that includes getting cut up, o.k. Lots of luck. However, are you that weak-minded that you can't change your ways?

    In my 35 years in the gym, I've seen lots of success stories. You need to CHOOSE to be successful.
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    Apr 17, 2009 12:51 AM GMT
    paradox saidInteresting... just last week, after reading one of your threads, I had the thought that your best bet would be surgery.

    Back in 2004, I took a Body Electric School course with a guy who was huge, probably bigger than you are. Since then, he had a gastric bypass, lost 170 pounds, and recently won Mr. Boston Leather 2009. When I see pictures of him today, I don't even recognize him. And, a friend of mine has a son who peaked at 700 pounds, had gastric bypass at 500 pounds, and is now down to around 325. So, it definitely can be a very successful method of losing weight.


    Just wish it wasn't my only option icon_sad.gif
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    Apr 17, 2009 3:56 AM GMT
    jprichva saidNoName,

    This is not to warn you off, but be sure you have access to psychological counseling after you have the operation. I know eight different people who've had it, and while each one is fine now, each of them went into a deep depression about two months after the operation was performed. It didn't last long in any of the cases, but it was profound.

    Be sure you have someone who will watch over you in this respect.


    I don't know that I am definitely going to do it. I just don't know how much time I have left before something catastrophic happens.
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    Apr 17, 2009 4:02 AM GMT
    NoNameGuy saidI think he's probably right. All of my efforts have been for shit so maybe this is what I need to do.


    Um, what the heck are you talking about? If you want us to care, you should give some background info.

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    Apr 17, 2009 4:12 AM GMT
    fyi thats not your only option...
    letting you know, the bariatric lifestyle after the surgery looks way more complicated and less enjoyable than that if u just change the way you eat now and work out... not trying to bash your doctor but he prob is just saying that to make an extra buck..

    its harder for your body to absorb the proper nutrients...and u cant eat as much..just think if u just eat healthier, u can eat 2 cups of veggies, 4-8oz of lean meat, 1 cup of whole grain carbs... but u do the surgery and I think u can only consume about a cup of food before u feel full, which you might think is great, but definitely easier in long run if u just put mind power behind and just workout and diet correctly like we have been saying for the past 2 years!
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    Apr 17, 2009 4:33 AM GMT
    The post-op lifestyle is AWFUL and the long-term success rate is pretty dismal (after 10 years, only about 16% of patients actually maintain significant weight-loss). Read this article from the New England Journal of Medicine http://content.nejm.org/cgi/content/short/356/21/2176. You can sign up for a free trial to download the full text. I know I haven't followed your case, but it seems to me like you should really make sure you've EXHAUSTED every possible means on weight loss before getting a bariatric procedure. On the bright side, you're almost guaranteed to see improvements in blood pressure, blood cholesterol and diabetes after surgery!

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    Apr 18, 2009 12:35 AM GMT
    I can e-mail people PDFs of medical journal articles if they want to send me a message with their article request(s).
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    Apr 18, 2009 6:29 PM GMT
    You have plenty of other options NoNameGuy, you are just unwilling to follow anyones advice, so good luck with the surgery, because when you dont follow the post op advice and change your eating habits because that is all it really is you will just stay fat. and as you have already had a stroke i think catastrophic things have already happened.

    I know people who have been told they had to have the surgery or they would end up dead miraculously they were able to stick to a diet and nutrition plan and lose 100 pounds.
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    Apr 18, 2009 7:02 PM GMT
    keyboard smash Pictures, Images and Photos
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    Apr 18, 2009 7:24 PM GMT
    chuckystud saidFolks who have surgery often don't change their lifestyles and end up right back where they started. I've seen it time and again.

    True.
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    Apr 19, 2009 2:48 AM GMT
    And remember, other medical conditions may not go away if a concomitant commitment to change your lifestyle isn't made after the surgery. This includes such things as diabetes, high blood pressure, arterial blockage, heart disease, ad nauseum.
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    Apr 19, 2009 3:48 AM GMT
    Like others have said, it is very important to fully know what you are getting yourself into and seek psychological counseling before this operation. While this is (for the most part) elective surgery, after it is done...it is DONE! Many things change post-gastric bypass surgery.

    You are no longer suppose to drink alcohol, or any carbonated/caffeinated beverages. You cannot eat foods with highly concentrated sugars as this can cause dumping syndrome. You can no longer take any time released medications or medications that affect that your stomach (i.e. aspirin, ibuprofen, advil).

    A person also has to keep up their protein intake significantly. After a person has this surgery, their metabolic needs change. A protein intake of at least 70 grams a day is necessary to prevent malnutrition and other side effects such as loss of hair (some people experience this anyway).

    Also, people are usually experience a lot of gas after this operation.

    As far as success rates, I don't think a entirely true answer can ever be found. It all depends on the person...meaning YOU. There are people that live the way they are suppose to after this surgery, and they are fine. Then there are those that go back to their old ways...we know how their situation ends. I wonder if the later example of people tend to screw up the statistics.

    This is all I could think of right now! icon_neutral.gif
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    Apr 19, 2009 3:50 AM GMT
    so basically we see you get the surgery and then you have to give up soda, alcohol, and junk food. here is an idea just give up soda alcohol and junk food hahahahahaha


    and you actually cant get this surgery without significant psychological counseling
  • underbearboy

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    Apr 19, 2009 8:46 AM GMT
    1. I would echo many of the concerns listed above.
    2.. I know of two people (both women for some reason) who have done the surgery. The first was a friend who lived across the street from me. The operation was a life-changer for her - she looks and acts like a whole new, wonderful, happy person. I gather the recovery took quite awhile... and was only possible because she was unemployed at the time and able to put personal savings into having it.

    The second person is the partner of a lesbian friend. She is also doing great now, some 3 years later. BUT during the course of the operation, there were heart complications, and she came close to dying. That was not something anyone expected to happen... and God (and that doctor) was looking out for her that day on the table.

    I would echo that I think there are some really nice guys here at RJ who have tried / would like to help you succeed at your weight loss, etc... without taking such a major step as surgery. Think very carefully about all your options.

    peace,
    Brian
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    Apr 20, 2009 5:18 PM GMT
    chungo44 saidso basically we see you get the surgery and then you have to give up soda, alcohol, and junk food. here is an idea just give up soda alcohol and junk food hahahahahaha


    and you actually cant get this surgery without significant psychological counseling


    So, what are you saying?
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    Apr 20, 2009 5:29 PM GMT
    Find a better doctor.
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    Apr 20, 2009 7:50 PM GMT
    NoNameGuy said
    chungo44 saidso basically we see you get the surgery and then you have to give up soda, alcohol, and junk food. here is an idea just give up soda alcohol and junk food hahahahahaha


    and you actually cant get this surgery without significant psychological counseling


    So, what are you saying?


    I am saying that the only thing the surgery will require you to change all the things everyone has already told you to do because if you dont you will die or stay fat. so you could also just do everything everyone has been telling you to do for 2 years and not have the surgery. the surgery is not a cure all look at all roker he got skinny but hes fat again.

    and the last part was just saying that any reputable doctor will requires tons of psychotherapy before and after the procedure. I remember you saying your therapist was horrible and wrong, guess what that wont cut it this time around.
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    Apr 21, 2009 4:36 PM GMT
    ucla_matta saidFind a better doctor.


    This is one of the few that has been truthful with me.
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    Apr 21, 2009 4:40 PM GMT
    chungo44 said
    NoNameGuy said
    chungo44 saidso basically we see you get the surgery and then you have to give up soda, alcohol, and junk food. here is an idea just give up soda alcohol and junk food hahahahahaha


    and you actually cant get this surgery without significant psychological counseling


    So, what are you saying?


    I am saying that the only thing the surgery will require you to change all the things everyone has already told you to do because if you dont you will die or stay fat. so you could also just do everything everyone has been telling you to do for 2 years and not have the surgery. the surgery is not a cure all look at all roker he got skinny but hes fat again.

    and the last part was just saying that any reputable doctor will requires tons of psychotherapy before and after the procedure. I remember you saying your therapist was horrible and wrong, guess what that wont cut it this time around.


    Not really tons but a session or two before he/she signs off that I should have the surgery.

    As for the soda, junk food, etc., I would love to stop all that. The surgery will make that happen.
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    Apr 21, 2009 4:41 PM GMT
    I think this one told you what you wanted to hear.
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    Apr 21, 2009 4:58 PM GMT
    NoNameGuy said
    ucla_matta saidFind a better doctor.


    This is one of the few that has been truthful with me.


    No this is one of the few who has told you what you want to hear
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    Apr 21, 2009 4:59 PM GMT
    NoNameGuy said
    chungo44 said
    NoNameGuy said
    chungo44 saidso basically we see you get the surgery and then you have to give up soda, alcohol, and junk food. here is an idea just give up soda alcohol and junk food hahahahahaha


    and you actually cant get this surgery without significant psychological counseling


    So, what are you saying?


    I am saying that the only thing the surgery will require you to change all the things everyone has already told you to do because if you dont you will die or stay fat. so you could also just do everything everyone has been telling you to do for 2 years and not have the surgery. the surgery is not a cure all look at all roker he got skinny but hes fat again.

    and the last part was just saying that any reputable doctor will requires tons of psychotherapy before and after the procedure. I remember you saying your therapist was horrible and wrong, guess what that wont cut it this time around.


    Not really tons but a session or two before he/she signs off that I should have the surgery.

    As for the soda, junk food, etc., I would love to stop all that. The surgery will make that happen.


    the surgery will not make that happen. The surgery does not turn off the part of your brain that makes you want soda and junk food, until you get willpower the surgery is useless
  • Mikeylikesit

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    Apr 21, 2009 5:07 PM GMT
    Sounds like Therapy is what is needed!....If you have a defeatest attitude, then you will not succeed!. You are constantly feeling sorry for yourself. Get over it.
    icon_surprised.gif