HELP! Choosing Local Gym: Narrowed Down to 2 Choices.

  • underbearboy

    Posts: 74

    Apr 18, 2009 11:53 AM GMT
    I’m looking at two different gyms in my area. I’m looking to lose weight more effectively and tone at least… and hopefully finally gain 'a little' muscle though it is ‘very late in the game’ for me at 52.
    • Which gym would you choose, and why? I’ve checked out both in person… though haven’t used the equipment.
    • Prices are the SAME for both (though Gym B has the better introductory 3-month program)
    • Also given these two choices, would it make better sense to invest in equipment for a home gym? Or Cardio equipment if I choose Gym B? (Btw, I have checked out the forums here on equipment to start with… and also forums on machines such as Bowflex).
    • Gym B: My older gay brother goes to a ‘working class’ men’s gym for many years and has had no problems with homophobia (though his private life is kept private). Are there others at RJ who have also found this to be so? I think I’d definitely come across as inexperienced, but not Gay.
    • See my profile for other info, or just ask. Thanks for your thoughts.

    Gym A:
    • Clientele: Men and Women.
    • Time Open: 5am to 11pm.
    • Crowded? Crowded on weekday mornings and evenings and on weekends.
    • Lots of Cardio… not as many weight machines or free weights (generally there’s a wait for these).
    • Full service Gym: Juice Bar; Steam Room; Lots of Classes; Instructors.
    • Ambiance: Bright cheery modern look. Middle Class?
    • Cleanliness: All-around clean.


    Gym B:
    • Clientele: Overwhelmingly Men (a reviewer noted that there’s been more sightings of aliens in the nearby park, than a female at this gym!)
    • Time Open 24hrs.
    • Crowded? Crowded on weekday evenings (empty on weekdays and few folks on weekends)
    • Lots of weight machines and free weights (a few cardio, but machines are old)
    • Anti-Service Gym: No Juice Bar (machine with beverages though); No Steam Room; No Classes. Does have Instructors.
    • Ambiance: Bright fluorescent, bland functional look. Middle-Working Class?
    • Cleanliness: ‘Sweaty’ feel/scent to place. It’s been noted that it is the rare man who uses the showers there.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Apr 18, 2009 1:38 PM GMT
    depends on use.

    Which is the one you would go to (is one on a really busy road that you might not feel like driving along sometimes)? The best gym is the one you go to

    Next point: there´s no point in there being stufff there if you aren´t going to use it: I don´t really care about cardio machines, so they can have a 1000 and it doesn´t impress me. What times are you going to go?


    I´d try them both out (guest pass) a few times at the hours you would use them

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Apr 18, 2009 1:59 PM GMT
    It depends on how you use the gym and how much positive reinforcement you need to stay motivated.
    It sounds like the middle-class gym would provide more social opportunities. I find it's a lot easier to stay on track because I enjoy seeing and talking with my gym buddies every day. If my gym wasn't friendly it would be much less pleasant to be there.
    On the other hand some people prefer to focus on their workout without any distractions. If that's you, the more basic 24-hour gym might be best.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Apr 18, 2009 6:10 PM GMT
    underbearboy saidI’m looking at two different gyms in my area. I’m looking to lose weight more effectively and tone at least… and hopefully finally gain 'a little' muscle though it is ‘very late in the game’ for me at 52.
    • Which gym would you choose, and why? I’ve checked out both in person… though haven’t used the equipment.
    • Prices are the SAME for both (though Gym B has the better introductory 3-month program)
    • Also given these two choices, would it make better sense to invest in equipment for a home gym? Or Cardio equipment if I choose Gym B? (Btw, I have checked out the forums here on equipment to start with… and also forums on machines such as Bowflex).
    • Gym B: My older gay brother goes to a ‘working class’ men’s gym for many years and has had no problems with homophobia (though his private life is kept private). Are there others at RJ who have also found this to be so? I think I’d definitely come across as inexperienced, but not Gay.
    • See my profile for other info, or just ask. Thanks for your thoughts.

    Gym A:
    • Clientele: Men and Women.
    • Time Open: 5am to 11pm.
    • Crowded? Crowded on weekday mornings and evenings and on weekends.
    • Lots of Cardio… not as many weight machines or free weights (generally there’s a wait for these).
    • Full service Gym: Juice Bar; Steam Room; Lots of Classes; Instructors.
    • Ambiance: Bright cheery modern look. Middle Class?
    • Cleanliness: All-around clean.


    Gym B:
    • Clientele: Overwhelmingly Men (a reviewer noted that there’s been more sightings of aliens in the nearby park, than a female at this gym!)
    • Time Open 24hrs.
    • Crowded? Crowded on weekday evenings (empty on weekdays and few folks on weekends)
    • Lots of weight machines and free weights (a few cardio, but machines are old)
    • Anti-Service Gym: No Juice Bar (machine with beverages though); No Steam Room; No Classes. Does have Instructors.
    • Ambiance: Bright fluorescent, bland functional look. Middle-Working Class?
    • Cleanliness: ‘Sweaty’ feel/scent to place. It’s been noted that it is the rare man who uses the showers there.


    Gym B unless you're a fairy with a rigged schedule. Or, better yet, Gym C, where everything new, they're open 24 x 7, and it's got everything.

    You can gain muscle, and should at 52 years old. Weight lifting will strengthen your bones, increase your base metabolism (the only that will), and make you look MUCH better. Be certain to ease into it, and, almost certainly, you should see the doctor about testosterone / AAS therapy to improve mood, recovery, performance, protect your heart, and prevent diseases of aging. With good diet, adjusted hormones, and smart training methods, there's absolutely no reason you shouldn't be able to exercise well into your 70s, or beyond.