Office Protein

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    Nov 02, 2007 2:30 AM GMT
    When I was working freelance, I could eat any disgusting high-protein thing I wanted. In fact, my cat and dog used to fight over my leftover tuna tins.

    But now that I'm back among cilivized people, I have to watch what I eat. Tuna is out and boredom has set in.

    My daily routine of cottage cheese, protein powder with oatmeal and protein bars is pretty lackluster.

    What do other guys trying to gain weight / stay in shape bring to your cube? It's not just protein. I try to eat a nice mix of protein (at least 40 grams) and complex carbs 6 times a day.

    I eat breakfast and dinner at home, but I eat three meals at work:

    AM Snack
    Lunch
    PM Snack

    ...and of course the Diet Pepsi/Diet Dr. Pepper break in the afternoon.

    Some typical snack combos include:

    Cottage cheese and/or protein powder
    PBJ with whole-grain bread and natural PB
    Fruit

    Protein powder mixed with oatmeal and water

    I need some help to add variety to my muscle-building diet. What is your favorite office-safe protein snack?
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    Nov 02, 2007 2:47 AM GMT
    My lunch today could have been taken to an office in a small cooler. It was a chicken salad made with two sauteed chicken breasts, a diced red bell pepper, a grated carrot, juice of one lime, finely grated fresh ginger, teaspoon of cayenne, dried tarragon, olive oil, salt to taste.

    For snacks, I nibble on raw macadamia nuts and almonds.
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    Nov 02, 2007 5:42 AM GMT
    Chicken, mustard, and grits, with veggies.
    Turkey, mustard, and grits with veggies.
    Nectar brand protein and Vitargo
    Lean red meat, and sweet potatoes.
    Lean red meat, and rice.

    Mix and match your carbs and proteins
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    Nov 02, 2007 7:21 AM GMT
    What are grits?
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    Nov 02, 2007 11:09 AM GMT
    grits are a nasty itch you get on your man parts. 'i've got the grits!'
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    Nov 02, 2007 11:23 AM GMT
    Pasteurized Liquid Egg Whites.

    53 gms of very digestible protein in 1 cup. mixes well with anything, if you want some flavor - otherwise essentially odorless and tasteless (and NOT slimy).

    I mix it with Costco "Talking Rain" mango/tropical zero calorie stuff, or a vitamin water.

    In a shaker bottle with ice, it will stay safely cool for quite a while. In a thermos, most of the day.

    Plus, you can sip it at your desk and no one will think it's anything more complicated than a soda.

    www.prime-fit.com - follow the link (look for a flexing chicken~~~ )
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    Nov 02, 2007 11:25 AM GMT
    How about a PBJ icon_surprised.gif

    simple easy to make protien.
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    Nov 02, 2007 12:40 PM GMT
    "What are grits?"

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Grits

    "Grits is a type of corn porridge and a food common in the Southern United States consisting of coarsely ground corn."
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    Nov 02, 2007 1:01 PM GMT
    Here's a typical PB&J Sandwich:

    2 slices of wheat bread: P 05.46g C 23.75g F 01.82g 133 kCal
    2 tbsp of chunky peanut butter: P 07.70g C 06.90g F 15.98g 188 kCal
    2 tbsp typical jelly P 00.06g C 29.38g F 00.01g 112 kCal
    Totals P 13.22g C 60.03g F 17.81g 433 kCal
    *Total Calories P 52.88 C 240.12 F 160.29 453.29 kCal
    *Percent Distribution P 11.67% C 52.95% F 35.36%


    *some carbs are sugar alcohols and will calculate to a lower value - so the carb % is a little high, the other two slightly low.

    Looks like a bad thing to me - about 12% protein and over 35% fats... 13 grams of protein is not exactly a high-protein snack in any case.

    Joey
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    Nov 02, 2007 1:07 PM GMT
    This may seem obvious, but can't you just adjust the quantities of the peanut butter and the jelly and get a better result? Same for using a whole grain bread and using a low sugar or sugar free jelly? I'm a regular PB&J junkie. I go heavier on the PB, use low sugar or sugar free jellies and whole grain bread. Am I killing myself softly with my sandwich? icon_redface.gif
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    Nov 02, 2007 1:10 PM GMT
    No

    Peanut butter is good for you unless it's really smooth and hydrogenated.

    YUMM!

    Nov02_05.JPG

    Poly unsaturated and mono-unsaturated fats are good for you...like olives, too.

    I eat peanut butter even when I'm extra lean. It's one of the things that I indulge in.
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    Nov 02, 2007 1:16 PM GMT
    As chunky as I can find (suprisingly, usually the store brand) and only natural where the oil and the nut mash have separated. Mmmmmmm.
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    Nov 02, 2007 1:50 PM GMT
    Thanks for all the great advice, guys!

    And as Chucky so proudly displays, I also use Smucker's (or Trader Joe's) natural PB, which mostly has good fats and far less sugar than regular PB.

    I tried to sell my son on natural PB. Even though he is non-verbal, I clearly get the sign for "all done" every time I try the switcheroo with his PBJ.

    It's all a matter of being pro-active, too. When I plan ahead of time (such as grilling a big batch of chicken breasts over the weekend or buying several bags of the awesome new Uncle Ben's microwave brown rice), I can eat the right stuff.

    If I'm scrambling, then I'm spending too much money on protein bars at GNC -- protein bars that have lots of hidden sugar and are often high in fat.

    Any other suggestions?
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    Nov 02, 2007 2:14 PM GMT
    I have a food scale, a spreadsheet, and press to close (Ziplock) bags.

    I weigh food out ahead of time. Mark it with my felt tip marker (Sharpie), and away I go.

    I take chicken breasts (Alberston's), lean white turkey, shrimp, and lean brisket, and measure it out. about 150 to 190g at a time, per bag.

    I also do the same with rice and sweet potatoes and even corn.

    It's a breeze. Kinda' like Richard's Deal A Meal, but, I'm a lot cooler and sexier.

    I see fat folks that say they can't manage this, but, for me, like shaving my chest, jerking off, or whatever, it's just part of my routine.

    I use the USDA SR19 food calc, or the SR20 food calc, and use a spreadsheet and scale to track anything going into my mouth. I also have the USDA data online at musclehead.tv (one of my properties).

    I grab several bags from my freezer; throw them in the Chuckystud (Scott) cooler, and I'm off in the Chuck Truck listening to my Sirius radio.

    (I was trying to see how many brand names I could stick in here.)
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    Nov 02, 2007 2:23 PM GMT
    "the Chuck Truck"

    No Chuckwagon?

    Sirius - got it. I'm always on OutQ or classic rock. Occasionally Howard.
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    Nov 02, 2007 2:25 PM GMT
    Well, there used to be the Chuckmobile...but, it was retired...

    I had a 71 Ford LTD Broughm, with a 400 ci engine, and an AC that was like a reefer truck. Drove it until I could see the pavement in the floorboards. Finally, I gave it to the city. :-)
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    Nov 02, 2007 2:34 PM GMT
    I don't understand why can you not eat tuna anymore. It sounded like time was one constraint but it sounds like there are others since this new job is putting you in some different lifestyle where the foods you used to eat are now boring. I'm curious as to why.