Adding 100 push-ups a day to a routine?


  • Apr 21, 2009 12:51 PM GMT
    I recently set a goal to do 100 push-ups a day on top of my weekly weights routine.. I'm wondering what people think about this, though? I managed to do 100 yesterday just fine, but is every day too much?
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    Apr 21, 2009 1:07 PM GMT
    i place a 20kg plate on my back so i dont have to do as many...and it really shocks the shit out of my shoulders and chest.
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    Apr 21, 2009 1:23 PM GMT
    Depends on the reps in each set. 10 sets of 10 reps each throughout the day may not result in much development, you need to work the muscles enough to generate a growth response. When I taught push-ups as part of the US Army's physical fitness program, I used the "overload" method.

    Step 1: Attempt as many "good" pushups as you can nonstop at a good pace, until you're forced to quit, and record the number.

    Step 2: Use 80% of that number as your training target. Do that number of reps, in 1 nonstop set once a day. You should be able to achieve that number each time, but if not, lower the reps until you can. You may also alternate days, especially at the beginning to avoid injury.

    Step 3: After 2 weeks, perform another max-reps test on yourself. The number should have increased a little, so raise your 80% target training level accordingly.

    Step 4: Continue this pattern for as long as you wish.

    You will eventually reach a plateau where no improvements are noted. You may even see temporary fall-backs, for multiple reasons. These are normal. Just keep performing at the 80% training level of your most recent self-test result.

    Studies suggest a 60% of max reps target produces good results, too, although in the Army I always used 80%. We were a select population group already in good shape & relatively young, but for those not as fit a lower target may be better.

    Many people will not stay with a physical fitness routine if they make it too hard on themselves, and it becomes unpleasant. No need to attempt your max reps each day until collapse, when a more enjoyable 80% will produce virtually identical improvements.

    BTW, I used this overload method for other Army exercises, as well, like sit-ups.
  • torontoguy222...

    Posts: 410

    Apr 21, 2009 1:56 PM GMT
    Hmm, ya my instincts say that 100 is too much. That's basically just a cardio workout in the end.

    I can think of two ways to make it tougher. One, as Craig mentioned, is to add a weight on your back. The other, which I do sometimes, is to use plyrometrics to increase the intensity. Basically every 4 or 5 reps I use all my force to throw myself off the ground. It's really quite deadly, and tires me out far more quickly. It's also a nice change. Try it out!
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    Apr 21, 2009 1:58 PM GMT
    there are lots of variations you can use too:

    narrow arms
    diamond
    wide stance
    uneven arms
    raised legs
    one leg (increases the weight load)


    etc
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    Apr 21, 2009 2:33 PM GMT
    I do 125 daily, 75 when I get up and when I go to bed both wide and narrow position. I don't do sets I like to just knock them out move on.

    icon_biggrin.gif
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    Apr 21, 2009 2:36 PM GMT
    it is a dumb idea just like doing situps every day is a dumb idea. your body needs to rest to grow so by doing pushups everyday you are just going to stop yourself from growing
  • calibro

    Posts: 8888

    Apr 21, 2009 2:42 PM GMT
    I start off each morning with 100 push-ups and 500 crunches. This isn't my workout, and those two exercises alone aren't enough to supplement for any needed intensity, but it's a great way to start warming up your body and bringing your heart rate up at a safe level. Also, nothing wakes me up faster.
  • Bunjamon

    Posts: 3161

    Apr 21, 2009 2:44 PM GMT
    chungo44 saidit is a dumb idea just like doing situps every day is a dumb idea. your body needs to rest to grow so by doing pushups everyday you are just going to stop yourself from growing


    I second that insight. 100 pushups every other day should be the max, especially if you're doing loads of other chest exercises.
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    Apr 21, 2009 3:31 PM GMT
    For those not quite ready for a hundred pushups:

    Hundredpushups.com

    "If you're serious about increasing your strength, follow this six week training program and you'll soon be on your way to completing 100 consecutive push ups!"

    http://hundredpushups.com/
  • HndsmKansan

    Posts: 16311

    Apr 21, 2009 3:39 PM GMT
    As a part of my morning cardio routine, I do 3 sets of push ups, generally 6 days a week... 45 reps, standard push up, 35 with a decline and 25 with an incline = 105. It isn't too much, but I don't always do all of them everyday.. and before long I'll change it up again.
  • MikemikeMike

    Posts: 6932

    Apr 21, 2009 3:48 PM GMT
    Blue,

    Sit ups everyday yes. Push ups every other. Muscles grow when you rest.

    I got my PT cert for my own edification and that is what I read in many different sources.

    Peace mike3
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    Apr 21, 2009 3:52 PM GMT
    try this:

    The NASA push up program

    Take your max rep push up, for instance 50, divide it in two, that'll be 25. Then you perform this number of push ups every hour on the hour for 10 hours a day. Each day you add a rep. When you can't keep doing the prescribed reps anymore, you back off on the reps, for instance 5 rep less per set, and instead decrease the set intervals, so you'll be doing the push ups every 55 minutes. Every day you work on the same number of push ups, but cut off 5 minuttes between sets every day. When you can't keep up anymore, you take a day off and test your new PR and begins again. Keep adding reps in the same fashion as the first cycle. So it's essentially two cycles: one adding rep within a fixed timeframe between sets, and another cycle where you work on time between fixed rep-sets.
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    Apr 21, 2009 4:33 PM GMT
    MikemikeMike saidBlue,

    Sit ups everyday yes. Push ups every other. Muscles grow when you rest.

    I got my PT cert for my own edification and that is what I read in many different sources.

    Peace mike3


    NONONO

    situps every third day. your abs are a muscle like every other muscle in your body they need rest. why do people just get stupid and forget everything they know when it comes to abs
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    Apr 21, 2009 5:49 PM GMT
    I don't understand such an unbalanced program. What's the rationale? Clear thinking would indicate there are other areas of your body that need worked, as well.

    What are the poster's goals? Anybody bother to ask?

    I'm not sure that over training is an issue with such low intensity but the whole notion seems contrary to common sense, unless he's wanting a full body workout every day, which goes contrary to resistance training, kind of, and so on.

    I noted in the poster's profile that he wants to study to become a personal trainer. I recommend he start reading that manual.

    I had to giggle that the poster went on about goals in his profile, but, failed to mention his goal in his posting.

    http://www.ptonthenet.com/ is a great place to get volumes of professional level personal training information, and I think it was $10.00 a month when I subscribed to it. This site, bodybuilding.com and ptonthenet.com are some great resources for some better information.

  • Apr 21, 2009 8:01 PM GMT
    chuckystud saidI don't understand such an unbalanced program. What's the rationale? Clear thinking would indicate there are other areas of your body that need worked, as well.

    What are the poster's goals? Anybody bother to ask?

    I'm not sure that over training is an issue with such low intensity but the whole notion seems contrary to common sense, unless he's wanting a full body workout every day, which goes contrary to resistance training, kind of, and so on.

    I noted in the poster's profile that he wants to study to become a personal trainer. I recommend he start reading that manual.

    I had to giggle that the poster went on about goals in his profile, but, failed to mention his goal in his posting.

    http://www.ptonthenet.com/ is a great place to get volumes of professional level personal training information, and I think it was $10.00 a month when I subscribed to it. This site, bodybuilding.com and ptonthenet.com are some great resources for some better information.


    I'm impressed that you read my profile, but think you misread my post icon_biggrin.gif When I said, "I recently set a goal to do 100 push-ups a day on top of my weekly weights routine", I should have probably described my current program to alleviate any confusion. I *am* studying to become ACE certified, but I'm nowhere near an expert (and I don't think getting a certification can do that for you either.. I think it takes asking lots of questions like this one and doing research on your own).

    My current routine is:

    Cardio/morning abs


    M - F: 6 AM - 30 minutes of cardio (treadmill, elliptical, bike), 20 roman chair situps, 20 reverse crunches

    Flexibility

    Tues - beginner yoga (1 hr)
    Wed - gentle yoga (1 hr)
    Thurs - yoga 90 (1.5 hrs)

    Weights:

    Monday: Warm-up, (Incline Dumbbell Press x6, Wide-Grip Front Pulldown x5, Angled Leg Press x6) x3, 2 minutes of rest in-between, then Wide-Grip Front Pulldowns x8, then x12 at declining weight, then Angled Leg Press x8, then x12 at declining weight, Cooldown

    Wednesday: (with no rest inbetween) Angled Leg Press x6, Lying Leg Curls x6, Seated Dumbbell Press x6, Wide-Grip Front Pulldowns x6, Rope Extensions x6, EX Curl Bar Curls x6 (120 seconds of rest); Angled Leg Press x10, Lying Leg Curls x10, Hanging Knee Tucks x20 (120 seconds of rest), Seated Dumbbell Press x10, Wide-Grip Front Pulldowns x10 (120 seconds of rest), Rope Extensions x10, EZ Curl Bar Curls x10, Hanging Knee Tucks x20

    Friday: Warm-up, (Incline Dumbbell Press x6, Wide-Grip Front Pulldown x5, Angled Leg Press x6) x3, 2 minutes of rest in-between, then Wide-Grip Front Pulldowns x8, then x12 at declining weight, then Angled Leg Press x8, then x12 at declining weight, Cooldown

    Now all that beings said, I can probably tell you I'm not getting enough rest. I think I'm obsessed. icon_biggrin.gif Let me also say that I REALLY appreciate all the feedback you guys have given so far. I know that adding in 100 push-ups a day might be too much overload (I decided to try it starting yesterday.. today is day 2 and I'm more sore today than I've been in awhile), but I wasn't sure if I was being a pansy and should just ignore it and push forward or rethink it.

    [Edit]: I also really love the idea of adding weight onto my back to do fewer of them. I'm definitely thinking about giving that a try.
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    Apr 21, 2009 9:27 PM GMT
    500 crunches a day?!

    Where does anyone get the time to do 500 crunches? And what sort of quality is the 456th crunch?
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    Apr 24, 2009 9:18 AM GMT
    redheadguy said500 crunches a day?!

    Where does anyone get the time to do 500 crunches? And what sort of quality is the 456th crunch?


    It is not that hard. I just do it at the end of my work out. I usually doing a few different variations of crunches (crossed-leg, etc), at 125x4.

    I've set a similar goal of 100 push-ups a day but found that I need to have one or two days of rest. I'm going to try the suggested programs about.
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    Apr 25, 2009 7:22 AM GMT
    Everyone is so different. What works for someone will definitely not work for another. That is why I am a bit leery about answering this question.

    I always go back to saying, if that works for you and it seems to increase your strength, fitness, ect. do it. If it seems too much and you are hitting walls, cut back a bit. Everyone is so different. I could never say do this or do that, do 20 reps instead of 50 reps. It all depends on the fitness level you start with and what your individual physique can take. There really is no one answer. Numbers wise.

    Push yourself as far as you can go. Then go a bit farther. We all generally quit before we really reach the level we can obtain. Human nature. Push it a bit farther each time. Beyond comfort level. Never say I will do 10 of this or 100 of this. Do "this" until you can't possibly do anymore. That is how you build a fit body over time.

    Just one man's opinion.......
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    Apr 25, 2009 7:32 AM GMT
    I am not sure why guys have a hard time figuring out how to do 500 situps/ crunches a day. Or 100 pushups. Together, both should take 5 minutes, maybe 10? I am busy, but I can set aside 10-20 minutes a day. Just talking timewise.
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    Apr 25, 2009 7:54 PM GMT
    Red Vespa's advice at the beginning of the thread is very sound. Everyone's target is different, so you can't go by absolute numbers. 80% of your max is a great target.

    And listen to your body. If your chest is awful sore, don't go doing more pushups until it's recovered. Inflammation = healing. Pushing it past that = damage.
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    Apr 25, 2009 10:12 PM GMT
    I was doing on average 100-200 push ups 5 days a week last summer, and I noticed a huge difference in my upper body strength. The key for me was applying to the pushups the same things I applied to running. Not pushing myself to fatigue everytime I exercised, but doing just enough to add to that solid foundation while still allowing my body to recover from any hard days. I did not do push ups the days after chest and shoulder days, but they would be incorporated into my chest and shoulder work outs.
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    Apr 25, 2009 10:30 PM GMT
    HTTP ADDRESS GOES HEREhttp://stronglifts.com/forum/grease-the-groove-t14236.html[url]

    check out these articles you can increase your max reps without burning out your central nervous system while you do other training.
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    Apr 26, 2009 4:19 AM GMT
    Do it. What can it hurt? Maybe a bit of overtraining if you are really doing chest and triceps enough in the gym but few people really overtrain. Most people just tire and call that overtraining.

    I say do it.
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    Apr 26, 2009 4:55 AM GMT
    every other day is good enuficon_wink.gif