Work out after knee surgery

  • BeingThePhoen...

    Posts: 1157

    Apr 23, 2009 3:18 AM GMT
    I had surgery on my right knee several years ago to have the meniscus removed. I just recently started working out on a regular basis, but have trouble with my knee popping during leg exercises. It doesn't pop say, if I stoop down and recover under my own weight, only with weight resistance, but it doesn't have to be much weight resistance. It is uncomfoftable and irritating, but doesn't hurt. Should I start very light weight and work up gradually, ignore the discomfort and do the exercises as I normally would, or what? Any Ideas?
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Apr 23, 2009 3:23 AM GMT
    Did you go through rehab after your surgery? What's the PT say you could and couldn't do? When I had ACL reconstruction, I went through weeks of therapy, but didn't have any kind of popping. That doesn't sound good. I would definitely check with your doctor and/or a PT.

    Either way, I'd definitely start with light weight and work your way up. Ignoring pain isn't usually a good idea.
  • BeingThePhoen...

    Posts: 1157

    Apr 23, 2009 3:31 AM GMT
    halltd saidDid you go through rehab after your surgery? What's the PT say you could and couldn't do? When I had ACL reconstruction, I went through weeks of therapy, but didn't have any kind of popping. That doesn't sound good. I would definitely check with your doctor and/or a PT.

    Either way, I'd definitely start with light weight and work your way up. Ignoring pain isn't usually a good idea.

    I never went to PT. Was supposed to, but that's a long story.
  • BeingThePhoen...

    Posts: 1157

    Apr 23, 2009 3:56 AM GMT
    halltd saidDid you go through rehab after your surgery? What's the PT say you could and couldn't do? When I had ACL reconstruction, I went through weeks of therapy, but didn't have any kind of popping. That doesn't sound good. I would definitely check with your doctor and/or a PT.

    Either way, I'd definitely start with light weight and work your way up. Ignoring pain isn't usually a good idea.

    There actually isn't any pain, just discomfort.
  • gallus81

    Posts: 350

    Apr 23, 2009 5:57 AM GMT
    I had similar surgery at the start of 2007 and within a few weeks started back with body-weight exercises; mainly squats, and slowly built up the strength in my legs and never had any real problems. Skip forward to today, I am back doing general weights for full body (I don't do heavy weights for my legs as I do a lot of running, etc and don't feel it necessary) ... my knee isn't perfect; sometimes gets a bit 'slack', but otherwise I'm not limited.

    solution; maybe keep of the weights and build it up with body-weight squats, burpees, plyometric jumps, running (short distance sprinting and longer distance if possible) and move up to adding weight in a few months once you've regained stability and strength.
  • gallus81

    Posts: 350

    Apr 23, 2009 6:11 AM GMT
    and of course every situation is different, but the big thing I had to work on was my VMO (Vastus Medialis Oblique) strength and new I was well on track when I was able to do full squats without a limited range of motion ... and the ultimate was when I could perform a dozen or so single leg squats ... once you're doing these you're probably in a good place (regarding knee stability and strength anyway).

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Apr 23, 2009 6:13 AM GMT

    It would be sensible to get this checked out by a medic. Usually with knee problems, assuming there is noting which can actually be treated, it is ok to build up the weights very slowly.
  • swimr

    Posts: 19

    Apr 23, 2009 1:38 PM GMT
    My ACL snapped in 2006, and since then I've had several surgeries to get a functional knee back. Post surg, my doc starts me back with non-weight-bearing exercises on land (leg lifts/hydrants/kickbacks etc) and swimming, before I can get into spin cycling, squats, lunges and other exercises which gradually allow the muscles to get stronger without putting the supportive ligaments/tendons at risk. Best advice: talk to a doc before starting back at an exercise program following a serious injury or surgery.