Organic Food

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Apr 23, 2009 4:42 AM GMT
    So yesterday I was grocery shopping and I'm in the produces isle and I pick up the least disgusting looking batch of strawberries I can find. Then I walk through the small "Organic" isle and I noticed the section of bright red popping out at me. There were the most beautiful strawberries I've ever seen. They were only a dollar more that day, so I said what the hey and I bought them...

    Anyway, not only did these strawberries LOOK like strawberries do in movies and cartoons (unlike the oddly shaped, awkward strawberries that I normally bought, but they tasted HEAVENLY.

    So, I finally understand the whole Organic food craze.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Apr 23, 2009 5:04 AM GMT
    Strawberries are in the same family as tomatoes, potatoes, peppers, eggplants, and quite a few others too.

    Strawberries fight cancer
  • MSUBioNerd

    Posts: 1813

    Apr 23, 2009 6:23 AM GMT
    No, they're not. Strawberries are very distantly related to those other three groups, as far as plants go. Strawberries are in the Family Rosaceae; potatoes, peppers, and eggplants are in the Family Solanacea. They're not only in different Families, they're in different Orders. You need to go further back in the phylogenetic tree to get the groups to meet up.

    For illustration purposes, humans are in a different Order, but same Class (the level above Order) as elephants. And the duck billed platypus.

    Of course, what is required to be an Order versus a Family differs somewhat between plants and animals. Still, it's a distant relationship.
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    Apr 23, 2009 6:25 AM GMT
    LOL. Way to put the kibosh on that one, MSU. icon_lol.gif

    I don't stress so much about organic, but I'm pretty diligent about buying local. By buying from local farmers, you're not only supporting local farms, but also reducing your carbon footprint by not having food shipped over great distances. Also, a lot of produce in grocery stores is picked unripened (because it transports better and doesn't spoil as easily) and then artificially ripened with the use of a chemical called ethylene. As far as I'm aware, it doesn't cause any negative effects; however, when food is picked before it's ripe, it doesn't have the same nutritional content or taste that a locally-grown (or organic) product would.

    For local produce, check out farmer's markets in your area (a lot of the vendors should be organic too). And if organic is too pricey, make sure it's at least "spray free," which means the food's not covered in pesticides and herbicides. (Organic has more stringent regulations.)

    Aaaand ... last but not least ... a handy guide to what foods have the most spraying (what you should buy organic) and what foods have the least (if all organic is breaking the bank):

    http://www.foodnews.org/EWG-shoppers-guide-download-final.pdf


    You print it off and you can keep the card in your wallet.
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    Apr 23, 2009 6:51 AM GMT
    juishe saidSo yesterday I was grocery shopping and I'm in the produces isle and I pick up the least disgusting looking batch of strawberries I can find. Then I walk through the small "Organic" isle and I noticed the section of bright red popping out at me. There were the most beautiful strawberries I've ever seen. They were only a dollar more that day, so I said what the hey and I bought them...

    Anyway, not only did these strawberries LOOK like strawberries do in movies and cartoons (unlike the oddly shaped, awkward strawberries that I normally bought, but they tasted HEAVENLY.

    So, I finally understand the whole Organic food craze.


    Yeah try growing your own produce...that is even better than organic. I can't even eat a store bought strawberry ,,,,they are disgusting.
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    Apr 23, 2009 8:07 AM GMT
    Yeah, buying organic is worth it. in the summer, my family grows our own as well. lol i have to say its pretty cool having your own strawberry patch... we've also got cherry, apple, and plum trees. icon_smile.gif

    but in an alaskan twist, we have to maintain "moose-barrier" of net around the trees so the stupid things don't kill the trees by stripping the branches down to twigs.
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    Apr 23, 2009 12:53 PM GMT
    I'm not hyper-religious about buying organic, but I do avoid the 'dirty dozen', especially the ones that are staples of my diet, like apples, celery, and lettuce.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Apr 23, 2009 1:00 PM GMT
    I am not too big on the organic thing, preferring local (and local organic if I can find it). But there is something magic about organic strawberries. They are not the huge mutant berries that pass as fruit these days, but remind me of the strawberries I used to pick at local farms when I was a kid. And nothing can taste as good as an idealized childhood memory.

    yum, yum.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Apr 23, 2009 1:04 PM GMT
    I try the best to at least get my meats, produce, and dairy products organic. Other foods, like the pastas and crackers and whatnot, I'm not as concerned about.

    Oh, and if you think organic strawberries are great, just wait until you try organic milk..... **swoon**
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    Apr 23, 2009 3:21 PM GMT
    Grow ur own...most times if certified organic, it will rot quik...or just start ur own garden, da timing is perfect. U can rent a garden or if u have a backyard, get busyicon_lol.gif I shop exclusively at whole foods, hopefully u have one.
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    Apr 23, 2009 6:24 PM GMT
    juishe saidSo yesterday I was grocery shopping and I'm in the produces isle and I pick up the least disgusting looking batch of strawberries I can find. Then I walk through the small "Organic" isle and I noticed the section of bright red popping out at me. There were the most beautiful strawberries I've ever seen. They were only a dollar more that day, so I said what the hey and I bought them...

    Anyway, not only did these strawberries LOOK like strawberries do in movies and cartoons (unlike the oddly shaped, awkward strawberries that I normally bought, but they tasted HEAVENLY.

    So, I finally understand the whole Organic food craze.


    You got lucky that day. Almost without exception, modern farming brings superior products to market as compared to products of yesteryear. The food is of better quality, resists pests, tolerates handling better, and spoils more slowly.

    Farmers uses modern farming practices for a reason: they work. It's not just about bringing you affordable food, but, also about keeping it safe, and having appealing products. Many fruits, and vegetables, are much hardier, pest free, and large with fewer bad ones than in prior decades, as a direct result of selective breeding and modern farming practice practice. In some places where 70 bushels per acre of corn was commonplace, now, that yield has nearly tripled.

    Modern farming practices bring you higher quality food for a LOT less money.
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    Apr 23, 2009 6:35 PM GMT
    Organic is the way to go icon_biggrin.gif
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Apr 24, 2009 10:21 PM GMT
    define "better quality" with regards to mass production fruits and vegetables.

    Those pale hard bland tomatoes I saw in the grocery store today probably enjoyed their thousand mile truck ride during the 2 weeks it took them to get here, but I won't be enjoying them in my sandwich
  • vindog

    Posts: 1440

    Apr 26, 2009 6:31 PM GMT
    chuckystud said
    juishe saidSo yesterday I was grocery shopping and I'm in the produces isle and I pick up the least disgusting looking batch of strawberries I can find. Then I walk through the small "Organic" isle and I noticed the section of bright red popping out at me. There were the most beautiful strawberries I've ever seen. They were only a dollar more that day, so I said what the hey and I bought them...

    Anyway, not only did these strawberries LOOK like strawberries do in movies and cartoons (unlike the oddly shaped, awkward strawberries that I normally bought, but they tasted HEAVENLY.

    So, I finally understand the whole Organic food craze.


    You got lucky that day. Almost without exception, modern farming brings superior products to market as compared to products of yesteryear. The food is of better quality, resists pests, tolerates handling better, and spoils more slowly.

    Farmers uses modern farming practices for a reason: they work. It's not just about bringing you affordable food, but, also about keeping it safe, and having appealing products. Many fruits, and vegetables, are much hardier, pest free, and large with fewer bad ones than in prior decades, as a direct result of selective breeding and modern farming practice practice. In some places where 70 bushels per acre of corn was commonplace, now, that yield has nearly tripled.

    Modern farming practices bring you higher quality food for a LOT less money.



    In my opinion some foods are better, some do not matter. I agree it has become cheaper, but cheaper food is often of lower quality.

    There are certain foods that have been proven to be higher in vitamins, EFAs and antioxidants than their conventional counterparts. Whether it
    is significant enough to buy it is up to the individual to decide. While I found this article (with references) very informative I think overall its a personal/social/political choice, as the body recognizes all foods as a bunch of molecules anyway.

    [url]http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/10587.php
    [/url]


    One thing I think people aren't really considering, and this is mentioned in the article, is that while individual pesticides, fungicides, fertilizers have shown to be safe, the "cocktail effect" of them isn't studied. This is where things can go awry on chemical level.