How do you keep from being horribly sore the next day????

  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Nov 04, 2007 4:04 AM GMT
    I've got this problem of being very very sore the day after I work out. Sometimes the soreness will last for a few days after the workout. Which then not only keeps me from working out again for a few days, but hurts so bad I dont want to move my arms or muscles period. Am I doing something wrong? What do you do to keep from being sore. By the way I dont have a spa in my home so please dont suggest massages and stuff like that.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Nov 04, 2007 4:45 AM GMT
    Please upload pictures.

    Please provide your workout reps, exercises, and frequency.

    Pleas provide a list of what you eat prior to your compliant.
  • MSUBioNerd

    Posts: 1813

    Nov 04, 2007 4:53 AM GMT
    It depends a lot on what you're doing. For me personally:

    Stretch both before and after. I know some will say it's dangerous to stretch before exerting yourself, and some say the same thing about afterwards. For me, I find I'm best off if I do stretch both time, but I don't guarantee that's universal.

    Certain activities benefit a lot from me immersing myself in hot water afterwards. Baths are best, but a hot shower will do in a pinch. My biggest trigger on this is indoor rock climbing--if I don't take a bath or shower within a few hours of that, I am likely to be very sore in the near future.

    Make sure your form is correct. I get sore virtually whenever I do an exercise incorrectly.

    Finally, figure out degree of soreness and whether it's to be expected. I'm often somewhat sore the day after racquetball, as I'm twisting in weird positions and slamming into walls and sometimes hit with a hard ball traveling at high speeds (today's strike to the middle of my spine hurt a lot). But most of the time, it's an easily dealt with level of soreness, not the crippling "I can't hold a pen" thing I'll get if I'm not careful with indoor rock climbing, or the "stairs are almost impossible to navigate" bit that came from one violent game in high school.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Nov 04, 2007 5:21 AM GMT
    I would love to see an answer to this as well, since I have found myself sometimes having the same problem. Once I started the RJ muscle building workout my whole body was in pain for days. Part of that was that I think I came down with mild food poisoning, so I know that factored into the picture big time. But even putting that aside, I am still often sore for days on end and worry about going back to the gym and working muscles that are still sore.

    I wonder if this has a lot to do with simply overworking at the gym. Perhaps you (and by virtue of my similar problems, I) should try cutting back a bit on reps, sets, or weight. That's just speculation, but it seems logical to me. It would be great to get some better advice, though, from people who actually know what they're talking about--ie, not me. icon_smile.gif
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Nov 04, 2007 5:59 AM GMT
    Many guys have this problem, especially when they are first starting out.

    I usually recommend a lot of stretching before and after working out - I can't emphasise enough the importance of stretching.

    The second thing I recommend to most people is to do less weight and more reps. Concentrate on form, and doing one rep at a time perfectly.

    Unless your arthritic your body should not be debilitatingly sore the next day.

    You should be 'pleasantly tired/sore' but not in actual pain.

    Use a spreadsheet to help you keep track of your exercises, weights, and reps.

    Initially try cutting your weights by 1/3 and increasing the reps gradually over a period of weeks.



  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Nov 04, 2007 2:04 PM GMT
    I agree with BioNerd ... I stretch for about ten minutes before *and* after I lift. I do a combo of traditional stretches and a few yoga stretches.

    A few years ago, I really did a number on my back. It was a combination of things, but mainly carrying my son on one side of my body for over three years. One rep of an overhead press went a touch too far and zing ... I was out of commission for over a month.

    After that, I started stretching at least every night before I went to bed -- that same 10 minute routine. That made a huge difference in my recovery and helps me continue to recover.

    I also started lifting with better form to work my muscles instead of my ego icon_confused.gif
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Nov 04, 2007 3:58 PM GMT
    Lessee:

    1. Never ever stretch a cold muscle, unless you're an elite athlete, or especially naive and stupid. Period. Dumb, dumb, and dumber. (A cold muscle is much less elastic...DUH). That's why weekend warriors get fucked up: they do everything wrongly. Cold stretches, not stength nor cardio conditioned. Wrong stretches. Etc., ad nauseam.)

    2. Post workout soreness often is micro-tears in the muscle. It peaks two days after. You can lower it by "flushing" the muscle group the day after. E.g., for legs, ride a bike at log intensity for 10 minutes, and flush the muscle out. It'll make a world of difference. If you have poor to average capillarizatizion, and less recovery ability know that as you go along that should improve, given adequate calories as so on.

    3. If you're getting THAT sore, there might be something else going on, or you might be lifting like a moron.

    4. Empower yourself: try googling on "muscle soreness." A large number of universities have studied this in their sports science program. Organizations like The National Strength and Conditioning Association study this stuff, too. (I've been studied.)

    5. Without knowing how long a person has trained, their state of health, their natural somatype, it's hard to advise them in a qualified way. Best the person study up.

    6. As you go along, educate yourself, and your body makes adaptations, your recovery ability will improve. After 32 years of resistance training, I rarely get sore, even at very high levels of intensity. The human machine is begging to be pushed, but, you also have to learn to eat, rest, and utilization of periodization and peaking to your advantage. Like the idiotic notion of streching a cold muscle, you need to learn to educate yourself on sports science, and it IS science.

    7. Make sure you lift weights through the FULL RANGE OF MOTION.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Nov 04, 2007 3:59 PM GMT
    I've started taking glutamine recently, and it seems to help me recover faster from the soreness.

  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Nov 04, 2007 4:47 PM GMT
    You mention pain due to "overworking" your muscles in your profile, Strongbolt. Why do you think that isn't responsible for your pain now?

    I've read several articles in the last year referring to studies that question the value of stretching before lifting. Much more effective, the articles said, is doing warm-up sets. I've found that to be true for me, and, like Chucky, I practically never get muscle soreness any more.
  • gymingit

    Posts: 156

    Nov 04, 2007 5:09 PM GMT
    The first time I received a massage, due to migraine headaches, my massage therapist told me to drink 3 extra large glasses of water in order to remove all the impurities and lactic acids which are released during the massage. Soreness sets in once they've settled. Thank God for the urination process. Same with workingout your muscles. ALWAYS DRINK PLENTY OF WATER.

    LANCE
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Nov 04, 2007 6:15 PM GMT
    It happened with me the first time i wieght-trained ..

    I just couldn't move my arms a bit .. it was so bad and painful ..

    Fortunately, it happened with me once .. i think your muscles need to be used to the training (if you just started) ..
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Nov 26, 2007 3:11 AM GMT
    L-Glutamine,stretching and plenty of water.
  • MikemikeMike

    Posts: 6932

    Nov 26, 2007 9:44 PM GMT
    calcium magnesium and malic acid after your workout- muscle soreness will be gone. This will help release the latic acid build up.

    peace.

    look up DOMS everyone gets them at some point. Delayed Onset Muscle Syndrome. It is normal.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Nov 26, 2007 9:53 PM GMT
    I do get fairly severe soreness in the legs sometimes - especially if I haven't lifted heavy for a while. It starts about 30 hours after the workout and can last for several days.

    As chucky said, a bike ride seems to stop it. Though this seems counter to the general advice to "rest" the muscles in order to grow them.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Nov 26, 2007 10:33 PM GMT
    You should never be sore for more than two days with any exercise. If you are your over training. Back down on your sets, or weight and go with perfect form. Make sure each muscle group is not being worked out with another group thats getting a secondary workout.
    Up your intake of Glutamine, on leg day I take 10mg and 10mg for two days after that. Make sure your getting enough protein, sleep, and vitamins. Use the soreness to gauge how well you hit that muscle, in two days the soreness should be gone.
    Keep in mind, one of the biggest mistakes in bodybuilding is over training.
    Great workouts
    Joe
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Nov 26, 2007 11:00 PM GMT
    I so was thinking something else when I clicked on this topic. I'm slightly disappointed.




  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Nov 27, 2007 12:05 AM GMT
    YOUR SUPPOSED TO BE SORE! When you work out you tear muscle fibers, your basically making microscopic tears. They are healing when your sore, building new fibers where the the tears are at. I enjoy the soreness, makes my bed feel all that more comfortable. And a light massage in the area feels great. If your not sore after your work out and you want to gain mass. Your not gaining anything if you dont feel sore. The most you will be doing is excercising your heart and getting a slight cardio workout.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Nov 27, 2007 5:49 AM GMT
    Just pop a couple ibuprofens after your workout icon_wink.gif
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Nov 27, 2007 6:14 AM GMT
    eat cherries!
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Nov 27, 2007 5:48 PM GMT
    http://www.emedicine.com/pmr/topic117.htm

    Here's a nice summary on DOMS (as opposed to ordinary workout soreness). Bottom line: nobody knows what causes it. Nothing is effective at treating it, except light exercise and sometimes... cherry juice! Cool, I happen to own a cherry orchard. Such a deal.

    Seriously, I think there are issues beyond over-training here for some people. There has to be some factor that varies between individuals. For example http://www.realjock.com/topic/54368/. And I seriously doubt that I am over-training when I get these. I wonder if it has something to do with having arthritis or other autoimmune predisposition. The delayed onset really seems as if it's a secondary response of some sort.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Nov 27, 2007 6:03 PM GMT
    I live in a perpetual state of soreness... and frankly i love it!!!!

    There's an old guy here in my office who once said "You get to a point in your life where, when the pain stops, you have to check if you are still alive".

    The Marines say "Pain is weakness leaving the body", i know drag queens who say "Beauty is pain, and pain is beauty", geisha, ballet dancers, and gymnasts and circus performers are all prime examples that fron great pain comes great beauty.

    If you follow basic rules (such as those colorfly outlined by Chucky) you should be fine.

    You will adapt, learn to love the pain your in!

    "I know i can stop the pain if i will it all away"
    Whisper by Evanescence
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Nov 27, 2007 6:20 PM GMT
    Sometimes, it seems as if masochism is the only reasonable explanation for most of the things that we do.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Jan 08, 2008 11:36 PM GMT
    A friend told me that if you eat more potasium it helps a lot with the soreness. Is that true? Also where do you get glutamine, and does it have negative side effects?

    Side Note: Yesterday I got to talking to this chick next to me on the bike machines, and over an hour later when we were wrapping up the convo, I realized I had been peddeling non-stop the WHOLE time. lol. very bad.....
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Jan 09, 2008 12:04 AM GMT
    if ya want potassium just get your bananas in, but potassium is more for cramps and not lactic acid.

    Active recovery tends to workout the stiffness, ie gentle swim cycle or walk. But a good cool down and strething is the best advice. for me I tend to do a 5 minute light cardio warm up to get the blood pumping and 5 minutes stretching at start and 5 min cardio cook down and 10 minutes stretching at the end.

    One day you will type my routine doesnt give me doms no more, what am I doing wrong icon_lol.gif So enjoy that pleasurable pain knowing you earnt it icon_lol.gificon_lol.gificon_lol.gif
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Jan 09, 2008 12:10 AM GMT
    I love the pain from a great workout, but then, I think I might be a bit of a masochist. icon_lol.gif