Working out while sore

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Apr 29, 2009 9:16 PM GMT
    Hey guys,

    Do you know if it is safe/healthy to work out while your muscles are still sore? Part of me tells me I should lay off, the other side is saying that im lazy and need to go to the gym.
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    Apr 29, 2009 9:37 PM GMT
    Training a muscle when it is sore can be safe, under certain conditions. Any training that causes the muscle soreness to increase should be discontinued.

    Light exercise, or exercising other muscle groups, can lead to an increase in blood flow and reduction in overall inflammation.

    Light training, with high repetitions, can be done with a muscle that is sore. Aerobic work, or high repetition anaerobic work (such as sprinting, plyometrics, etc) at 75% or less of maximum intensity, may also be safe. Heavy training with a muscle that is not fully recovered may put additional stress on the muscle, and the tendons, and could lead to injury, or at best increase total recovery time

    When dealing with muscle soreness it is important to remember that soreness due to intense training is a good thing. It means the muscle has sustained some micro-damage and will repair and be bigger and stronger.

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    Apr 29, 2009 9:51 PM GMT
    In other words try cross training.
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    Apr 30, 2009 1:03 AM GMT
    [quote][cite]kneedraggen said[/cite]Training a muscle when it is sore can be safe, under certain conditions. Any training that causes the muscle soreness to increase should be discontinued.

    Light exercise, or exercising other muscle groups, can lead to an increase in blood flow and reduction in overall inflammation.

    Light training, with high repetitions, can be done with a muscle that is sore. Aerobic work, or high repetition anaerobic work (such as sprinting, plyometrics, etc) at 75% or less of maximum intensity, may also be safe. Heavy training with a muscle that is not fully recovered may put additional stress on the muscle, and the tendons, and could lead to injury, or at best increase total recovery time

    When dealing with muscle soreness it is important to remember that soreness due to intense training is a good thing. It means the muscle has sustained some micro-damage and will repair and be bigger and stronger.

    [/quote

    Great stuff.

    One thing you can do is "flushing" to help smooth out delayed onset soreness. If your legs are sore, ride the bike at low intensity for 5 minutes, or if it's chest, back, or arms, do a couple of sets of light dumbbell in the 25 to 50 ranges, and "flush" the muscle group. Almost always, you'll find a faster recovery.
  • barriehomeboy

    Posts: 2475

    Apr 30, 2009 1:27 AM GMT
    Depends on your age. The younger you are the less damage you do by working out while you're still hurting from the last workout. Generally speaking though, that no-pain-no-gain thing from the 80's turned out to be a pile of crap. Pain is your body's way of telling you to stop doing something, such as sticking your finger in the candle flame. Post workout pain should only last a day, at your age. If it last longer, tone down your workout.
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    Apr 30, 2009 3:30 AM GMT
    just listen to ur body bro...if its tired and sore, then stay out of da gym.icon_wink.gif
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    Apr 30, 2009 1:28 PM GMT
    no pain no gain