Gay Pride Parade - for or... against?

  • trop

    Posts: 2

    Apr 30, 2009 10:43 PM GMT
    I live in a big city where there's an annual pride parade that's like a really big deal. I went last year, but this year I'm thinking: what exactly am I going there for and what exactly am I being proud of? Yes, there are quite a few activists marching, but it seems like the original purpose of the parade - calls for freedom and liberation - became outdated in a city like New York. The vast majority of the parade today consists of people who just want to get laid and dress appropriately. Why is pride reduced to that? What were the battles fought for? To be able to wear an outrageous outfit and get laid under the bushes? That's fun and all, but we already have places designated specifically for such activities, and the parade itself just promotes the stereotype we're all familiar with. When debates for a pride parade take place in places that are much less accepting and tolerant, the first "argument" used against it are the pictures of parades such as the one in NYC. Maybe other parades are different, I haven't seen them, but maybe this can start a discussion of some sort.
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    Apr 30, 2009 11:39 PM GMT
    Some will say they are good.

    Others will say they are bad.

    No one will be civil.

    So it has gone. And so it shall go again. Amen.
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    May 01, 2009 12:12 AM GMT
    Many of the "stereotypes" you refer to are the reason you have many of the rights you have today. Try to keep that in mind before you pass judgment.

    As for your "getting laid" comment, how is that any different from most of our social outlets, online and off? Whether I agree or not, I don't see this as a good argument as this activity isn't specific to Pride events. As for myself, I am often with friends during Pride so I find I tend to get laid less.

    Pride means different things to different people. I think your first goal should be discovering what Pride means to you. I find many of the younger generations think because they don't relate to the old stereotypes, they have nothing in common with "gays", "the scene", etc. Even more disturbing, in our attempts to distance ourselves from the old stereotypes, we are creating newer more restrictive ones (a little off-topic but relevant).

    I would argue you don't have to live the stereotype or even like it, but at the end of the day we still have common threads that bind us together. Beyond the most obvious, we continue to face discrimination, hate, fear, intolerance, ignorance, and sometimes even death from those around us. You only need to turn on your tv to see proof of that.

    A sad but common view is that we should 'conform' in order to get the rights we deserve. As if pretending to be the same has ever worked for anyone in the past. The simple truth is I should not have to present an image, "act" a certain way, or profess belief in a deity just to obtain the rights I so rightfully deserve as a human being. My right to exist is not contingent on the permission or acceptance of another. And while we have more rights than ever before, there is still work to be done. Part of that work is showing solidarity as well as living openly/honestly about who/what we are. There may come a day when we no longer need Pride but we are not there yet.

    The outrageous and colorful will always garner a lot of media attention, that is the nature of our sensationalist media. I would argue for every flamboyant person you see there are 10 every day LGBT folks you don't see. The less obvious make up the vast majority of our community yet we often let the more visual components of our community speak for us. You cannot do nothing and then complain when the "freaks" (as many would shamefully call them) step up to fill the void.

    From my personal experience. I still remember my very first Pride and being overcome with relief from the sudden realization I was not alone. I would never deny that experience to anyone.


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    May 01, 2009 12:45 AM GMT
    I like the gathering part of the event, but could do without the constant sexual innuendo and show - it gives us a bad look and should be kept behind the doors of our homes and clubs. I should mention, I feel the same about Mardi Gras.
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    May 01, 2009 12:49 AM GMT
    I am neither here nor there about them.. they are what they are and I've no interest either way.. what is, is, has been and will be.

    Munchies, come to Sydney *nods*
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    May 01, 2009 1:04 AM GMT
    In Austin it is the weekend of June 6th. I intend on going for many many reasons. I went to the Pride Parade in San Fransisco many years ago and they also had a fairly big area with booths and stuff to do aside from just watching the parade. Austin has something similar though it doesn't happen at the same time. I think it's the next day.

    I can't say I saw any sexcapedes going on at either city.
  • SirEllingtonB...

    Posts: 497

    May 01, 2009 1:24 AM GMT
    Looknrnd saidI like the gathering part of the event, but could do without the constant sexual innuendo and show - it gives us a bad look and should be kept behind the doors of our homes and clubs. I should mention, I feel the same about Mardi Gras.


    I went to my first Pride last year and had a BLAST! icon_biggrin.gif

    I'm for the Parades because, for me, it's a time to celebrate how far we've come and gives us a general idea of how much work has yet to be done. The sexual innuendos sometimes tend to be a bit of an overkill but sexuality means different things for different people.
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    May 01, 2009 2:11 AM GMT
    I have never been to one yet... I will be going to the one in NYC at the end of June. I can't wait icon_biggrin.gif
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    May 01, 2009 2:15 AM GMT
    This topic has been hashed already, as MunchieZombie mentioned, and I'd be suspicious of the first posting of a brand-new, un-pictured "member" who hasn't asked for workout advice, participated in other forum topics, and decides on his first day to enter the fray with a provocative topic such as this.
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    May 01, 2009 2:21 AM GMT
    In the future, newbies must learn this feature:

    Pride Topics on this Site

  • May 01, 2009 2:27 AM GMT
    I completely agree with you. I live in Chicago and I refuse to go to the parades anymore. It seems that all the parade is is about sex. I have seen people have sex in the alies (did I spell that right?) and it just seems like a huge porno on the street. If they were about having rights or showing the community that homosexuals are not deviants then it would be different. The parades seem to reinforce all negative sterotypes and make all gay men look like sex crazed whores.
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    May 01, 2009 2:55 AM GMT
    mickeytopogigio saidThis topic has been hashed already, as MunchieZombie mentioned, and I'd be suspicious of the first posting of a brand-new, un-pictured "member" who hasn't asked for workout advice, participated in other forum topics, and decides on his first day to enter the fray with a provocative topic such as this.

    Good observation.
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    May 01, 2009 3:27 AM GMT
    I was pretty apathetic about pride parades. Then one day I'm visiting my mom's in the nursing home on the other side of the tracks in the video below. There were a good 10,000 people and all the local business had rainbow flags up. I felt proud but more about my little home town, Durham NC, in the heart of the bible belt. It started back in the 80s and now is the statewide parade. Now that is progress!

    I<object width=">

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    May 01, 2009 6:07 AM GMT
    as a political statement to promote civil rights, I'm for it.

    ... turned into a tacky freak show, then I'm not.
  • NursePractiti...

    Posts: 232

    May 01, 2009 6:38 AM GMT
    I'm all for them. There are way too many countries where people cannot even have a pride parade. They are not only a reminder of how far we have come, but how far we must go. When I lived in Wichita Kansas I participated in one of the first ones they ever had. It was quite the event. And yes there were the Phelps protesters, bikers, etc. Yes people did yell at us, call us names, etc. But we didn't care. Now I understand they have not had one in years. Here in Florida, St. Petersburg has one, and it gets bigger every year. But in other countries they get killed for doing this. Iraq's executions recently come to mind. It is because of the reason that some cannot have it that we must have them.
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    May 01, 2009 2:54 PM GMT
    I don't understand what the problem is.

    Gay Pride Parades are just another cultural event in this world. They don't hurt anybody they are just meant to be fun and they just serve as a mere visual entertainment. Have u ever been to a carnival in Latin countries? Trust me, the participants don't dress any better.

    I don't see any reason to create a negative message around something sane and cultural like gay pride parades, let alone when thousands of gay people are the ones promoting the event and potentially a 90% of those who go to a gay parade are the same ones who attend and organize other parades to fight for your rights on the streets while ure having coffee on a beatiful Saturday morning.

    <---- this has never been to a gay pride parade, but right now I would love to. I'm gonna dress as inapropiate as I can, basicaly screaming fuck me. But u know what's interesting? Last year I dressed up like a dead pirate for halloween and no one really believed I was a dead pirate...The only one who was actually scared of me was my neighbor( a 5 year old) but I didnt mean to scare him at all, I was just dressing up for the moment and having fun icon_wink.gif
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    May 01, 2009 3:05 PM GMT
    Oh boy not another post bashig gay pride!
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    May 01, 2009 3:08 PM GMT
    I am definitely for them, for reasons I have stated before in threads here. I dislike the sexual excesses when they happen, but that's not always the case. I have seen the opposite, and it's wonderful. And they do really make me feel proud, happy and connected with my GLBT community. Plus I've participated in quite a few, sometimes on motorcycle, or bicycle, or just plain marching.
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    May 01, 2009 3:35 PM GMT
    I think they are a great thing in general. I personally am not a huge fan. I enjoy the part about being outside with my friends but other than that I am personally not interested in much else.
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    May 02, 2009 11:22 AM GMT
    Its been said here, Gay Pride to me is one huge negative advertisement and set back gay men and woman. Its one huge excuse to get drugged up, drunk, or put on your favorite dress. But to the world, its very real, and very negative.

    Its scenes like this that had me closeted and saying for years. "Im not like these people".

    I have gotten allot of crap from my friends for my position on this, but Ive never ever attended a Gay Pride, and wont start now.
  • ManinSTL

    Posts: 38

    May 02, 2009 11:32 AM GMT
    I have mixed feelings on the gay pride movement. Personally I do not like or participate in the gay stereotype, just an average guy here. But, and this is a big but, the gay "stereotype" allows people like me to be viewed in a more favorable light by society.

    The more extreme the extreme is in anything social, the more there acceptable behaviours exist in the middle. So, whereas i do not believe in the gay "stereotype" and feel this tends to provide a negative image for all gay people, in reality it has allowed myself, and everyone who does not have a life to that exteme, to become viewed as acceptable in society.

    So personally, i think they are great! Go for it, but not for me.
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    May 02, 2009 12:12 PM GMT
    "Personally I do not like or participate in the gay stereotype,"

    Which stereotype would that be? Surely you don't mean the stereotype that says that gay men suck penises, put their penises in other men's asses and let other men put their penises in their asses, do you?

    Do you mean the interior decorator stereotype?
    Do you mean the muscle mary stereotype?
    Do you mean the gay men are so creative stereotype?
    Do you mean the gay men are rich stereotype?
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    May 02, 2009 12:58 PM GMT
    LuvMuscle99 saidIts been said here, Gay Pride to me is one huge negative advertisement and set back gay men and woman. Its one huge excuse to get drugged up, drunk, or put on your favorite dress. But to the world, its very real, and very negative.

    Its scenes like this that had me closeted and saying for years. "Im not like these people".

    I have gotten allot of crap from my friends for my position on this, but Ive never ever attended a Gay Pride, and wont start now.

    You've never attended one, but you already know it's when we "get drugged up, drunk, or put on your favorite dress." Can't remember doing that at any Pride Parade I've attended, whether watching them or being in the parades themselves, or during the festivals surrounding them.

    There are in fact excesses at some Prides, and I don't like those instances either, and have so stated in threads here before. I wish you could get to attend the "Main Street, USA" ones that aren't like what you're describing at all.

    Minneapolis-St. Paul is one, which also claims to be the third-largest in the country, after SF and NYC. Even our smaller one here in Fort Lauderdale-Wilton Manors is G-rated, and the crowds wear what we always do year-round down here: loose cargo shorts, T-shirts and sandals or joggers. Miami Beach just had their first in many years last month, and it was pretty tame, too, though with more costumes, and since it was right along the beach, some swim suits. But that's normal there anyway.

    The Pride Parades I've been in have included Members of Congress, mayors, fire trucks with firefighters, police, EMT, church groups, major corporations, youth groups, etc, etc, just like your hometown Fourth of July parade. Here's our Member of Congress Debbie Wasserman-Schultz (D-FL) right after the conclusion of our Pride Parade in Wilton Manors; nothing too radical-looking about this, wouldn't you agree?

    DSC00636.jpg

    Spectators come forward to carry the 1/3-mile-long rainbow flag down Wilton Drive:

    DSC00634_2.jpg
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    May 02, 2009 1:06 PM GMT
    live and let live icon_smile.gif
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    May 02, 2009 1:12 PM GMT
    The parade in Houston ( http://www.pridehouston.org/ ) includes plenty of family organizations, religious groups, social groups, charities, local and corporate bussinesses, members of the police, fire department, politicians, sport associations... All those groups represent different members and/or supporters of our eccletic community. We come together and celebrate one of the many aspects that make us who we are. We are all different, but share that commonality: we are or know some one who is gay, lesbian, bisexual, or transgender.

    I know, I know... one thing doesn't define ALL that we are. Guess what? The Parade effectively celebrates the diversity of people who are covered by the GLBT umbrella. We are everywhere. We have many different interests We come in all types. Yes, you probably intereract in your life with someone gay. It is ok. I sincerely believe that this is the one of the most important messages the parade provides.