US college sounds so cool!

  • beaujangle

    Posts: 1701

    May 01, 2009 1:08 PM GMT
    I see and hear marching bands, frats, football and cheerleaders in US colleges. Sounds like a lot of fun! I think they seem to have more fun than uni elsewhere. That's why I luv watching American Pie.

    Do/did you have heaps of fun at college? Any stories you wish to share?
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    May 01, 2009 2:28 PM GMT
    College can definitely have its fun times, but that's not the reason I chose to go to the states for University. If you are an international student, attending US Universities can cost upwards of 30,000.00 USD a year! That's a pretty big price tag for some fun, and unfortunately, the most common university experience is nothing like American Pie.
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    May 01, 2009 2:32 PM GMT
    and dont forget the college boys who'll do anything!
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    May 01, 2009 2:35 PM GMT
    College was one of the best times of my life. Plain and simple. School was so easy that I barely studied and still graduated with honors! So many outrageous stories! good times!
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    May 01, 2009 2:41 PM GMT
    It's great! One time, I stayed up real late studying (11 pm), then the next day I got up and had a good breakfast and then aced the shit out my O. CHem final.

    HEEEELLLLLLLLLL YEAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAH
  • TexanMan82

    Posts: 893

    May 01, 2009 2:42 PM GMT
    Nowhere like The University of Texas at Austin

    Hook 'em Horns
  • MSUBioNerd

    Posts: 1813

    May 01, 2009 2:52 PM GMT
    I loved college; I probably studied far more than I should have, but I still had a good social life. Too bad I wasn't out and dating during it. I definitely recommend living in the dorms for at least a year, as you get to know people so much better in the dorms than in apartments.

    But, as much as we don't like to admit it, money matters for education. Private schools or out of state schools are pretty expensive. And, to get a student visa you need to demonstrate capacity to pay for the education, which means that you're not likely to qualify for financial aid. Many schools are actually well over $30k a year in sticker price; once you include room and board and books, it's not unusual for a school to be up in the $40-50k per year range, and as a foreign student you'd be paying that full amount minus what you can get in merit aid, which isn't very common at the more competitive schools.

    My undergrad school (the University of Southern California) was making a deliberate effort to improve their academic reputation - most likely because academic reputation was the only thing holding them down in the rankings - so they began giving out a huge number of academic scholarships based on merit, not need. 100 full tuition scholarships and about 400 half tuition scholarships entice a lot of highly qualified middle class student who don't want to go $120,000 into debt to go to another competitive school. At the time I chose to go there, I had acceptance offers from a number of schools that were more highly ranked; not all of those schools still are.

    And though it's probably disloyal as an MSU student to say this, the University of Michigan is one of the few other highly competitive schools to give out a substantial amount of merit aid to out of state students.
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    May 01, 2009 4:46 PM GMT
    My college experienced shaped my adult life!

    Yes, I learned a tremendous amount IN the classroom, but I also found that what I learned OUTSIDE of class was invaluable as well.
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    May 01, 2009 5:10 PM GMT
    FYI As a transplant from Europe to a California College it's not all fun and games

    Harassing professors just trying to get into any class related to your major

    Competing with Adderal riddled asian kids taking it all a little too seriously and one second away from a nervous breakdown

    The fact that it costs so much for everything and there's always someone standing over you or writing you emails demanding more and more $$$
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    May 01, 2009 5:23 PM GMT
    stormwatcher saidCollege can definitely have its fun times, but that's not the reason I chose to go to the states for University.

    To Fargo? I attended Minnesota State University, Moorhead (MSUM), popularly known as Moorhead State, which you know is just a mile from downtown Fargo. Though I'd been a college professor and an administrator at UND in Grand Forks, I took some classes at Moorhead when I lived in Fargo a few years ago.

    I also joined their Ten Percent Society, and would staff their student table during Student Activities Day, many of the other GLBT students being too timid to be that visibly out in public. And I'd buy display items for our table out of my own pocket, the more traditional college students being short on cash.

    While I was there we had some sort of Penny Drive annual competition among the student activity organizations, where each group tried to collect pennies in these containers around campus. I was determined Ten Percent would win, for the first time ever.

    So I helped push our collections, until I finally decided to cheat. I just went over to a local bank on 8th in Moorhead, and bought $200 in pennies. Which they wouldn't do at first, until I sat down with the bank president and persuaded him it would be good PR among the gay students at the nearby campus. He authorized it.

    Ten Percent won the content easily, and we were all excited. Except the school newspaper, ironically the "Advocate" I think, never mentioned the results. I checked back issues, and previous year's winners had made the front page. Ten Percent got nothing.

    So I complained to the newspaper student editor, and was ignored. And I complained to the faculty advisor, and was ignored. Finally I went to the University President, who claimed to be sympathetic, but said he didn't interfere in student newspaper editorial policy, and the item was by then old news anyway.

    I was greatly discouraged, and wrote a letter to the newspaper, which they refused to print. So even though it had seemed at first a fairly gay-friendly campus, I learned there were still important pockets of resistance. I hope if you're at NDSU or Concordia they're friendlier these days.
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    May 01, 2009 5:30 PM GMT
    College was great, but not as great as paying back those student loans at $500-$700 a month. *note supreme sarcasm*
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    May 01, 2009 6:07 PM GMT
    beaujangle saidDo/did you have heaps of fun at college? Any stories you wish to share?

    Just remembered some "funner" ones than my post just above. I've always done college radio broadcasting, from the 1970s, sometimes to reinforce my degree work, but most times just for the fun of it.

    And even when I wasn't a student, and still an active duty Army officer in the US, I'd volunteer to sub during the summer, when local college radio stations would be short student DJs to keep their program schedule going. And we DJs were always doing silly stuff with each other.

    I might arrive for my shift while the previous DJ was doing news, sports & weather. If the weather called for rain, I might silently slip into the booth behind him, open an umbrella, and slip it into his hand while he was reading. He'd suddenly discover what he was holding, and have all he could do to keep from laughing on-air.

    (It's an interesting phenomenon that while reading live, the degree of concentration required can cause some people to become quite trance-like, that you can be doing things to them of which they are only partially conscious, and will then have a delayed reaction to it)

    Or I'd slip into the booth with a scissors, and as they sat at the mic I'd start cutting pieces from their copy as they were reading it. Never enough to destroy the text they had to read, but enough to make them nervous and giggly. Totally unprofessional, of course, but it was common among the students.

    Back in the 70s we did "rip & read" news stories off the AP teletype we had. I'd arrive about 45 minutes before my air time, collect the print out, cut up the stories I wanted to use in my 10-minute news segment, and enhance them with handwritten notes over the printed type.

    One evening I arrived to find the teletype had suffered a malfunction, the typewriter-like print head moving too far to the right, causing the last 5 characters to miss the paper on each line of print. I had to guess the missing words and write them in, or else skip the story if I couldn't figure it out, but it was slow going, and by the time of my show I hadn't gotten a full 10-minutes of copy prepared.

    So I scooped up the unedited printouts, too, and hoped I wouldn't need to use them. Needless to say, my prepared copy was inadequate for the 7 minutes of news in our format, and I had to go into the damaged copy.

    The first story in the pile was about the US actor Jack Cassidy having died in a fire (1976). I was reading it OK, until scanning ahead about 5 words as I usually do, I saw "Jack Cassidy was also notable for being the father of (blank) Cassidy, who is known for..." (etc) My mind racing, I couldn't think of his son Shaun's name.

    So in confusion what I actually said on air was: "Jack Cassidy was also notable for being the father of... his son. Turning to sports..."

    I just abandoned any more news, and went right into sports and weather, for which I did have some useful copy ready. Ah, the joys of live broadcasting.
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    May 01, 2009 6:53 PM GMT
    The funny thing to me is that all the classes that were the basis of education in college were the ones I completed with knowledge I was least likely to use. The classes that were fun, seemingly trivial, a waste, or stupid (as I would have described them at the time) were the ones that gave me far more knowledge, skills and applicable information in my professional life.

    I probably spent far too little time studying with diligence than I did cramming before an exam. One class' final was a portfolio review the entire contents of which I produced the prior day into the evening. I got an A.

    College was the most wonderful and horrible time in my life. I came out, I had my heart broken, and I discovered what 'excess' truly was through experience. Through the hazy, romanticizing view of the past, there were some fantastic times.

    The great thing is I'm going to see my roommate in a few weeks who I've not seen in over a decade. (Yay, Atlanta!)

    I feel like I should start singing "I'm still here." from Follies.
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    May 01, 2009 7:39 PM GMT
    My college years were the best -- Go BAMA!!!!!!
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    May 01, 2009 7:50 PM GMT
    This documentary explains it pretty well:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=43pkqeamXe8
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    May 01, 2009 8:31 PM GMT
    Even making allowance for the romantic haze, it was pretty wonderful. Never again in your life will your time be so completely your own. Never again will you have so many good things heaped up in front of you. You have challenging things to read, lots of interesting people to meet and talk with, no regular hours, lovely campus surroundings to insulate you from the world, free sports and recreational facilities to enjoy. And for the first time in your life you can be whatever you want to be.
    If only real life was like that, and if only the loans didn't have to be repaid.
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    May 01, 2009 10:39 PM GMT
    college blows.


    but then again, I'm going to a community college while living with my parents, so no naked miles, or any of that other stupid bullshit for me.




    /bitter