is there some way of doing pull ups fit for a beginner?

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    May 02, 2009 2:04 AM GMT
    i am finding it hard to complete five..as all ive done is bench presses since i started working out....but i see the results of doing pull ups on other guys and i want the same thing.
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    May 02, 2009 2:31 AM GMT
    two techniques

    (1) hang at the top. This develops strength
    (2) Then lower VERY slowly (the negative).

    If you do 5 with a hang and slow negative you will gain strength. You can even just do negatives: use a chair to climb you up to the top then slowly, SLOWLY lower down. Try and do it so no-one notices you lower down. REMEMBER TO BREATHE.


    Try another set after a rest. Also the heavier you get the harder the exercise is, so it can get harder the more you do it if you are gaining size. I donĀ“t like the cheat machines.

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    May 02, 2009 2:59 AM GMT
    thanks soo much ima try it now as i have the bar in my basement
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    May 02, 2009 5:55 AM GMT
    Try doing pyramid sets. Start out by doing 4 solid dead hang pull-ups. No kipping! Take a break. Next set, do 5 solid dead hang pull-ups. Take a break. Repeat and add 1 rep to each additional set. Stop when you can't complete the next +1 set.

    Tips..

    - Don't do pull-ups everyday. You can do them every other day. On your off days, just try hanging on the pull-up bar as long as you can for 3 sets. Part of the actual pull-up exercise is being able to support your own body weight. Hanging on the bar will help develop your grip strength and will make pull-ups a little easier.

    - If you arch your back a little, it helps distribute more of the workload to your lats. If you do pull-ups with a straight body/back, then most of the workload goes to your arms.

    - If you can get a spotter, try doing forced reps. Do as many pull-ups as you can in one set, and then ask the spotter to assist you, and do 2 or 3 more reps in the same set.

    DO NOT have the spotter hold your legs/feet. That's the incorrect way to spot someone on pull-ups. Ask them to place their hands on your back and give you a gentle supporting push, upwards.
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    May 02, 2009 7:25 AM GMT
    Think about the angle and the feeling in your muscles doing pullups.

    Then replicate those as accurately as you can doing pulldown from
    high pulley cable wide grip bar but at 1/2 or 2/3 your weight (or as
    much as you can do for 3 sets of 8 to 12) . Normally you might
    otherwise use a different angle on pulldowns, but this allows you
    to sneak up on full body weight pullups
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    May 02, 2009 8:16 AM GMT
    This video helped me out a lot!

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    May 02, 2009 1:29 PM GMT
    The fact that you can do 5 means a lot.

    I have guys ask me all the time about pullups, because I start my back workout with 50 and do more sets weighted later in the workout.

    some guys can't get 1, and they're more difficult to help.

    If I were you, I'd do the 5 or 6 or whatever you can do, and then take the other guys suggestions and do slow negatives. Get yourself to the top of the pullup (with a chair or a spotter) and then lower yourself as slowly as you can. Keeping in mind that however slow you are going....you can go slower...stop halfway if you can then continue to lower yourself. Go back to the top and do it again.

    Concentrate on pulling the bar down to your chest, not on pulling your chin above the bar. xrixhx's things to think about are good, and I'd add that you also need to think about your grip.

    if you're wasting a lot of energy white knuckling the bar, and find yourself unable to hold your hands around it for the required number of sets, then you should buy straps...and have someone in the store or the gym show you how to use them.

    good luck

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    May 02, 2009 1:43 PM GMT
    Lots of good advice in this thread! Wrist straps and negatives worked well for me. When I started I could do one half-assed rep by myself. My training partner then assisted me up (not lift, but assist) and then I came down very slowly, about 10 seconds. We went until my partner said I had nothing left; did a total of 4 sets. As negatives can be really tough on you we did this every other week, and did them regular on the off weeks.
  • ilprincipe

    Posts: 40

    May 02, 2009 7:37 PM GMT
    when i was a kid (maybe 10 years old) my dad wanted me to start doing pull-ups... i couldn't even do one, so he told me to start by doing pushups... before i knew it i was doing 10, 12, 20, 22... give it a try!
  • ajw18

    Posts: 141

    May 02, 2009 7:48 PM GMT
    To assist you later in your set, you can lightly place your feet on the top of the back rest of a chair to help alleviate some of the weight. Slowly, you should be able to wean yourself from the chair.
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    May 02, 2009 10:25 PM GMT
    also pull ups can be viewed as a skill and you could do three every hour on the hour.

    Totally not what the normal split routine/protein shake etc mentality would say, but it works.
  • torontoguy222...

    Posts: 410

    May 03, 2009 3:12 PM GMT
    My gym has an assisted pull-up machine where you can subtract the amount of weight you want. It's good for people who can't lift their entire body weight.