Forearm pain - Feels like shin splints

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    Nov 05, 2007 4:01 AM GMT
    If you are familiar with shin splints, you know how annoying and painful it is. Well, I have that same pain in my forearm. Whenever I do bicep work, I have the pain. It hurts the most when I use a straight barbell, but it also hurts quite a bit with a curled bar and hurts a bit with dumbell curls, but not as much. It when I am doing the lift with the bar, it hurts at the top of the contraction, and finally it hurts like a bitch when you release the weight back onto the rack (just like shin splints..... hurts when you shift weight OFF of that leg). I'm wondering if anyone has experienced this, what could cause it, and how to deal with it? My bicep work is at a standstill because of this.... Thanks!
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    Nov 05, 2007 7:07 PM GMT
    There's a good thread about this problem here:

    http://ask.metafilter.com/47555/Whats-up-with-my-forearm
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    Nov 05, 2007 8:35 PM GMT
    I have had a similar problem and my doctor tells me I've sprained my bicep. The only remedy is to lay off lifting weights until it heals.
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    Nov 05, 2007 8:50 PM GMT
    Make sure you are not lifting too much weight to fast...I think I was starting to have what you describe, I asked the owner of my gym and he suggested to take some weight off...I did and now the pain is gone. I also avoided straight barbell for a few weeks until the pain was all gone.
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    Nov 06, 2007 6:21 AM GMT
    Tendonitis can be a bitch.

    Ice it some, if it gets real inflamed. Take a NSAID (ibuprofen works for me) but NSAIDS, especially ancitametaphen, are hepa-toxic as all heck. You might consider asking your doctor for some nandrolone decante (deca) which will help your recovery, too. It's commonly used in these conditions. Stay away from cortisone, as you're asking for more grief later because of the very nature of it.

    Don't lift in poor form or to heavy. Do higher rep stuff to give the tendon / ligaments a blood supply which will help it adapt.

    Tendons and ligaments don't have much blood supply and take longer for an adaptive response to occur. That's why you need to flush that bodypart. If you lift in bad form; sudden movements; to much on a cold muscle; to heavy...you're asking for trouble.

    Now that it's inflamed you need to rest it or do high reps until it gets calmed down. Over the course of the next six weeks, in the strictest of form, try to ease it back. Remember: you need to flood that area with blood to speed that adaptation, and you can't continue to re-injury it. Let your body heal. Pain is a warning, and there's good pain, and bad pain, and really bad pain. This is likely what I call bad pain. It's a warning to back off.
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    Nov 06, 2007 10:20 AM GMT
    Agree with Chuckystud. That's good advice.
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    Nov 07, 2007 2:25 AM GMT
    Just for claficiation, tylenol (acetaminophen) techically is not an NSAID (it has minimal anti inflammatory properties). So the advice to watch out for it is good-- if you have inflammation, aspirin, naproxen, and ibuprofen might be better.
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    Nov 07, 2007 4:25 AM GMT
    You are correct.

    Many people use Tylenol.

    I always have to giggle when talk took about hepatoxicity. Tylenol is a leader. Way more danger than many other things.
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    Nov 07, 2007 4:25 AM GMT
    You are correct, kinda.

    Many people use Tylenol.

    I always have to giggle when they took about hepatoxicity. Tylenol is a leader. Way more danger than many other things.

    From Wikipedia:

    Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, usually abbreviated to NSAIDs, are drugs with analgesic, antipyretic and anti-inflammatory effects - they reduce pain, fever and inflammation. The term "non-steroidal" is used to distinguish these drugs from steroids, which (among a broad range of other effects) have a similar eicosanoid-depressing, anti-inflammatory action. As analgesics, NSAIDs are unusual in that they are non-narcotic. NSAIDs are sometimes also referred to as non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agents/analgesics (NSAIAs) or non-steroidal anti-inflammatory medicines (NSAIMs). The most prominent members of this group of drugs are aspirin, ibuprofen, and naproxen partly because they are available over-the-counter in many areas. Paracetamol (acetaminophen) has negligible anti-inflammatory activity, and is strictly speaking not an NSAID.
  • MikemikeMike

    Posts: 6932

    Nov 07, 2007 6:21 PM GMT
    Kala43,

    I use a french bar and I have never felt this pain again!

    mike3
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    Nov 14, 2007 1:29 AM GMT
    Thanks guys, I've been giving it a rest for about 6 days. I'm going to get back in the gym tomorrow and do the high reps/low weight as suggested!
  • daddysw

    Posts: 89

    Feb 02, 2013 11:13 AM GMT
    I've had this problem too and found my own solution.

    All the advice you have about keeping up with excercise (to maintain the blood flow and healing) is right. So I dropped my warm up weights to 50% of maximum and worked around 75% of my maximum.

    What I needed was some free excercise that would loosen up the forearm, and so what I devised was this (its might left forearm that has the problem). I'd rotate my forearm slowly but firmly clockwise and anti clockwise as far as it would go.

    In order to stop my whole arm from moving (from the shoulder) I'd grip just above the left elbow with my right hand, and this helped concentrate the action on the forearm.

    I'd do this 3 x25 several times a day (and occasionally combine it with a clenched fist bicep curl). Within a couple of weeks, it was noticeably better. Worked for me!
  • MuscleComeBac...

    Posts: 2376

    Feb 02, 2013 11:16 AM GMT
    Chuckystud has it covered here. Take good advice.
  • wild_sky360

    Posts: 1492

    Feb 02, 2013 11:25 AM GMT
    daddysw saidI've had this problem too and found my own solution.

    All the advice you have about keeping up with excercise (to maintain the blood flow and healing) is right. So I dropped my warm up weights to 50% of maximum and worked around 75% of my maximum.

    What I needed was some free excercise that would loosen up the forearm, and so what I devised was this (its might left forearm that has the problem). I'd rotate my forearm slowly but firmly clockwise and anti clockwise as far as it would go.

    In order to stop my whole arm from moving (from the shoulder) I'd grip just above the left elbow with my right hand, and this helped concentrate the action on the forearm.

    I'd do this 3 x25 several times a day (and occasionally combine it with a clenched fist bicep curl). Within a couple of weeks, it was noticeably better. Worked for me!


    That's exactly what a trainer told me recently and it's working. I also had to lay off at first, for 10 weeks. I tried to rush that part after 4 weeks on NSAID's and completely reversed the healing that had taken place. Until I started what you describe and trainer advised, I could barely lift a glass of water. Now at 10 weeks I'm back to my old lifting weight with just a tinge of manageable discomfort.