Generic VS Brand prescriptions.

  • metalxracr

    Posts: 761

    May 09, 2009 12:56 AM GMT
    I just got some generic prescription, don't know if I ever really got the other kind before, but I just want to know. Is there really a difference in the two? Should I have got brand name?
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    May 09, 2009 2:12 AM GMT
    hi. long time lurker. I work for a big PBM so i thought i would reply.


    the only difference between a brand and a generic is the filler they make it with, the shape and color. chemically they have to be the same as the brand.

    some people will have issues with generics because of the fillers. but most do not. and generics are usually a better approach simply for a cost savings. brands are insanely overpriced most of the time.

    try the generic. if you start having any issues call your pharmacist right away.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    May 09, 2009 2:14 AM GMT
    For me it depends on the product. Generally speaking, the generics have always worked for me except a few. And it depends on the brand of the generic too. Where I found a generic didn't work like the national brand was nicotine patches for quitting smoking. Nicoderm is the standard and is way too expensive. Walgreen brand sucks. Rite-Aid brand doesn't work either. However, after speaking with Target pharmacists and Walmart pharmacists, they told me that if I see a brand that looks exactly like the regular, it has to be the exact same thing in order to have a store name on it. So instead of Nicoderm, I get Target's brand at half the cost for the exact same thing. It pays to do some research.
  • metalxracr

    Posts: 761

    May 09, 2009 2:14 AM GMT
    Well, thanks! Makes sense, I'm happy with making the choice I made then!
  • Webster666

    Posts: 9217

    May 12, 2009 6:28 AM GMT
    An expert up above already answered about prescriptions.
    I was surprised in comparing the ingredients on over-the-counter medications, to discover that many of them are exactly the same, but with a big difference in price.