good book: The Age of the Unthinkable

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    May 09, 2009 3:30 AM GMT
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    "Today the very ideas that made America great imperil its future. Our plans go awry and policies fail. History's grandest war against terrorism creates more terrorists. Global capitalism, intended to improve lives, increases the gap between rich and poor. Decisions made to stem a financial crisis guarantee its worsening. Environmental strategies to protect species lead to their extinction.

    The traditional physics of power has been replaced by something radically different. In The Age of the Unthinkable, Joshua Cooper Ramo puts forth a revelatory new model for understanding our dangerously unpredictable world. Drawing upon history, economics, complexity theory, psychology, immunology, and the science of networks, he describes a new landscape of inherent unpredictability--and remarkable, wonderful possibility."

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    May 09, 2009 4:53 AM GMT
    Caslon10000 said"Drawing upon history, economics, complexity theory, psychology, immunology, and the science of networks, he describes a new landscape of inherent unpredictability--and remarkable, wonderful possibility."

    Why does he get to be so broad in his theories yet I, in my dissertation, am constantly getting hassled that I need to narrow down my point of view?

    p.s. How do you draw upon history to show "inherent unpredictability" if the premise is a homeostatic governing "ism"? Just curious.
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    May 09, 2009 4:59 AM GMT
    Pinny said
    Caslon10000 said"Drawing upon history, economics, complexity theory, psychology, immunology, and the science of networks, he describes a new landscape of inherent unpredictability--and remarkable, wonderful possibility."

    Why does he get to be so broad in his theories yet I, in my dissertation, am constantly getting hassled that I need to narrow down my point of view?

    p.s. How do you draw upon history to show "inherent unpredictability" if the premise is a homeostatic governing "ism"? Just curious.

    Where do you get the "homeostatic governing "ism"?
  • coolarmydude

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    May 09, 2009 6:36 AM GMT
    Layman's terms:

    cat-hat-book.jpg
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    May 09, 2009 5:03 PM GMT
    I like how he uses concrete, comprehensible examples to illustrate the principles that he wants to explain, like:

    Per Bak and his sandpile for organized instability

    Gertrude Stein, Picasso, and Cubism for multiple perspectives

    Miyamoto and Wii, and Danger Mouse for mashup creativity
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    May 09, 2009 5:35 PM GMT
    Pinny said
    Caslon10000 said"Drawing upon history, economics, complexity theory, psychology, immunology, and the science of networks, he describes a new landscape of inherent unpredictability--and remarkable, wonderful possibility."

    Why does he get to be so broad in his theories yet I, in my dissertation, am constantly getting hassled that I need to narrow down my point of view?

    p.s. How do you draw upon history to show "inherent unpredictability" if the premise is a homeostatic governing "ism"? Just curious.


    Cos it´s an academic thesis: you have to prove your point and that means detail.
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    May 09, 2009 6:13 PM GMT
    Charlie Rose interviewed the author a few days ago - interesting.
    http://www.charlierose.com/view/interview/10267
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    May 09, 2009 6:48 PM GMT
    good interview....thanks for sharing it! ... icon_biggrin.gif