should Santa Barbara, CA be rebuilt?

  • rnch

    Posts: 11525

    May 09, 2009 12:34 PM GMT
    out of control fires are raging thru santa barbara; the thrid time in one year!

    FEMA will sure offer assistance to the victims; those who are insured will receive compensation, the insurance companies will surely raise everyone's rates to compensate them for what they pay out to SB fire victims.


    should YOUR tax dollars be spent to help rebuild a fire prone area, an area the burns on a regular basis?













































    (this is a spoof of the IDIOT congress member's remarks; who asked if the city of new orleans should be rebuilt immediately after the United States Corps of Engineers faulty designed, built and maintained flood control system failed and flooded much of new orleans the day after the city survived the wrath of hurricane katrina.)
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    May 09, 2009 1:53 PM GMT
    Personally I think Yes, Im not American, Im Australian, and we every year go through the whole bush fire thing in Victoria, and New South Wales, an quite a few other states here as well, unfortunately this year was the worst by far, so many lives were lost so many people lost everything, Rich people, Poor People every one was affected in some way, So Im kinda biased to helping out these victims when they really need their countrymen to stand by them!
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    May 09, 2009 2:40 PM GMT
    Ideally, I would say "no". However, I know in Canada ( particularly Alberta), you will pay a higher insurance premium living close to these potential problem areas.

    I would chance living in one of these areas if the opportunity presented itself. I have never been to southern California but the photos are breathtaking. I'd be tempted.
  • metta

    Posts: 39169

    May 09, 2009 3:09 PM GMT
    I don't think that there is a Congressman in California that would say such a thing. The obvious answer to the Congressman is that it is Santa Barbara. It will be rebuilt. It is some of the most valuable property in California. I'm not sure, but I don't think that FEMA gives away money for the majority portion of the money given to individuals. I thought they were loans that need to be paid back. I live in a very risky area as well. I have fire and earthquake insurance. Anyone with a mortgage is normally required to have home owners insurance that includes fire coverage.

    I guess the Federal government may need to step in to help pay for repairing the roads, but I'm sure that Santa Barbara County will have some responsibility there as well. But it is nothing like New Orleans: no dams or levies needed in Santa Barbara.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    May 09, 2009 3:12 PM GMT
    Santa Barbara's setting is lovely but it's no cultural icon like New Orleans.
    New Orleans is like that other unsustainable, chronically endangered city -- Venice. Its unique cultural value makes it worth preserving.
  • roadbikeRob

    Posts: 14395

    May 09, 2009 3:19 PM GMT
    Yes Santa Barbara should be rebuilt but with tighter land use restrictions that will steer development away from disaster prone areas and back into the urban core and other older developed areas. Hey if we can rebuild New Orleans and its neighboring suburbs which mostly sit on below sea level land, than I see no legitimate reason why Santa Barbara cannot be rebuilt. At least Santa Barbara is well above sea level on solid land.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    May 09, 2009 4:02 PM GMT
    The same argument could be made regarding the rebuilding of beaches in the US.
  • GoodPup

    Posts: 752

    May 09, 2009 4:41 PM GMT
    The main part of the city hasn't even been touched by fire. And as bad as the national news might make our CA fires seem... its not like the entire place is burning. Some houses have burned down... but not nearly as much damage as they make it appear. I would guess that hurricanes cause more damage on the Gulf Coast.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    May 09, 2009 4:55 PM GMT
    That's where my dad went to college. Let it smoulder
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    May 09, 2009 5:16 PM GMT
    Actually, after Prop 8, the entire state can fall into the Pacific and I wouldn't miss any of it. icon_razz.gif
  • Rookz

    Posts: 947

    May 09, 2009 5:24 PM GMT
    Red_Vespa saidActually, after Prop 8, the entire state can fall into the Pacific and I wouldn't miss any of it. icon_razz.gif


    Me too! I'm just waiting for the day when I'm approved to move up to Canada!

    Actually, people who live there and CHOOSE to continue to live in urban-nature settings and knowing the winds around this time of year will bring in the forest fires, they should be held responsible to have their homes rebuilt. It should come from THEIR pockets if they want their homes built in the same fire-prone area. Those people understood OR should have looked up the history of the area that fires affect that area every year.

    Then again, this could be said to areas where floods, hurricanes and other natural disasters hit yearly.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    May 09, 2009 5:29 PM GMT
    I went to school in Santa Barbara. When I was at my admissions interview, I met a woman from there and asked her what she liked about Santa Barbara. Without a note of irony, she said: "There are no poor people in Santa Barbara."

    I feel pretty sure SB won't disappear.
  • GoodPup

    Posts: 752

    May 09, 2009 5:41 PM GMT
    withHonor said
    Actually, people who live there and CHOOSE to continue to live in urban-nature settings and knowing the winds around this time of year will bring in the forest fires, they should be held responsible to have their homes rebuilt. It should come from THEIR pockets if they want their homes built in the same fire-prone area. Those people understood OR should have looked up the history of the area that fires affect that area every year.


    This coming from someone who lives an an area notorious for earthquakes?
  • Rookz

    Posts: 947

    May 09, 2009 5:50 PM GMT
    Maybe you didnt see the fact I also noted areas which are hit by floods, hurricanes and other natural disasters? You can't just nick-pick certain words when I have already noted it.

    And there's fault lines ALL over CA, it's not picky whenever or wherever it hits.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    May 09, 2009 5:54 PM GMT
    Last fall, I received a fat envelope from the State of Oregon, with a half-inch thick manual. The cover letter said something along the lines of "your property has been identified as a wildland/urban interface." (Urban? Who are they kidding? I guess I'm connected to a city through the internet or something.) There's a long list of rules to follow about fire breaks and landscaping. If I don't get the property in the specified shape by January 1, the government is absolved of any responsibility for fighting future fires.

    Of course, all of this directly contradicts other orders I've received from the government. Anyway, I chose to ignore some of this, because shade and windbreaks outweigh the potential risk. But the risk is all my responsibility.

    Still... by the time I was finished with construction, I was kind of horrified by how all of the scraps of material make such great fire starters. Now I wish that I'd used a lot more concrete and less of the other stuff. I can't figure out how on earth "trex" decking ever got approved as a building material. When I was working in Spain, there were several big wildfires, but they mostly just burned around the all-masonry houses on the small farms, without much damage to the structures. Hmm... well, if I ever have to start over again...
  • Webster666

    Posts: 9217

    May 09, 2009 5:58 PM GMT
    Should we rebuild every town across America that has been damaged or destroyed by fire, flood, tornado, hurricane, earthquake ? Of course. If you live long enough, there's an excellent chance that you'll encounter some kind of disaster. With the exception of a tornado, I've experienced all of the above. And, each time, the damage to my property was covered by insurance and out of pocket expenses, not someone else's tax dollars.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    May 09, 2009 5:59 PM GMT
    What a bunch of doofuses.. icon_twisted.gif

    Yeah, there are actually a great many in Cali that DIDN'T vote for prop 8, so instead of saying something so mindlessly stupid, realize some of us are actually living here and fighting to have prop 8 overturned. Meanwhile, wtf are you doing to help, here or elsewhere?

    That said, I realize you were probably joking, but it's a bad joke. Welcome to the world of petty gay humor.

    Double meanwhile, of course SB should remain (and it's not like the whole city is burning...lol...maybe like 1% of the populated area). We could easily have the same arguments regarding towns in 'tornado alley', cities in the midwestern floodplains, etc. It'd be amazing if, before posting or answering a posting, some of you would do a bit of thinking or research to back your skewed views. icon_lol.gif
  • Webster666

    Posts: 9217

    May 09, 2009 6:03 PM GMT
    There are a hell of a lot of rich people living in Santa Barbara. While, they can't replace all their personal effects, their insurance should pay enough to rebuild an even more opulent red tile roofed palace.
  • roadbikeRob

    Posts: 14395

    May 09, 2009 7:04 PM GMT
    I agree with RandyMan 100% about some of the dumb postings on here. Wishing for California to slide into the Pacific becauseof the horrendous outcome of the proposition 8 vote, that is not only stupid but just plain sick minded. Proposition 8 only won by a small majority of the vote. Many Californians were strongly opposed to proposition 8. Furthermore, California is one of the nation's most beautiful and scenic states and probably the most diverse state in the nation. As for fault lines, they are everywhere, not just under the Coast Ranges of California. Look at Japan, Alaska, or the Middle East they are even more fault line ridden than California. Like I said earlier in this forum, Santa Barbara should be rebuilt but with more strict development guidelines to steer development into the urban core and other older developed areas. Suburban sprawl should be prohibited and development growth boundaries should be established and strictly enforced just like in Oregon. Some of these suburban sprawl loving middle class people who refuse to acclimate to a region's or city's way of doing things and following their laws need to go live someplace else if they don't like it.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    May 10, 2009 12:31 AM GMT
    Yes, we should, of course. Sure, some areas are more prone to disasters than others, but so what? Everyplace is vulnerable to something. . .

    Hurricanes along the East and Gulf coasts
    Earthquakes in the West and Midwest
    Tornadoes most everywhere, particularly the Midwest
    Floods most anyplace
    Fires most anyplace, particularly California
    Blizzards and snowstorms in the Northeast and Midwest
    Tidal waves both coasts

    Since we're still (nominally at least) A COUNTRY, a place where we presumably care about each other and supposedly united for a common purpose and not quite yet just a land mass of 300 million consumers who don't relate to anyone or any event outside their own tiny little universe. . . yes, we should rebuild Santa Barbara. . . New Orleans. . .et al. . . I can't imagine why anyone would feel otherwise.