good book: Destiny Disrupted: A History of the World through Islamic Eyes

  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    May 14, 2009 4:16 AM GMT
    Well-written and easy to read, this is a very interesting book giving the Islamic perspective on world history.

    I have always wondered why the Islamic civilizaton that was light years ahead of medieval Europe got stopped dead in its tracks....frozen in time...while Europe awoke and raced ahead. ...Abu Hamid Muhammed al-Ghazali is the culprit, I would say....if you can blame one man. But the times had to be right for him ... and they were.

    Destiny_Disrupted.jpg

    "We in the west share a common narrative of world history—that runs from the Nile Valley and Mesopotomia, through Greece and Rome and the French Revolution, to the rise of the secular state and the triumph of democracy. But our story largely omits a whole civilization that until quite recently saw itself at the center of world history, and whose citizens shared an entirely different narrative for a thousand years.

    In Destiny Disrupted, Tamim Ansary tells the rich story of world history as the Islamic world saw it, from the time of Mohammed to the fall of the Ottoman Empire and beyond. He clarifies why our civilizations grew up oblivious to each other, what happened when they intersected, and how the Islamic world was affected by its slow recognition that Europe—a place it long perceived as primitive and disorganized—had somehow hijacked destiny. Entertaining and enlightening, Destiny Disrupted also offers a vital perspective on current conflicts."


    If you want a good book that explains Islam to westerners...tells you who all those different muslim sects are and how they came about... I heartily recommend...

    no_god_but_god.jpg
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    May 14, 2009 5:08 AM GMT
    Wow. You read a lot of books. icon_biggrin.gif
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    May 14, 2009 5:09 AM GMT
    xrichx saidWow. You read a lot of books. icon_biggrin.gif

    "manure for the mind" ... mix it all up up there and it makes thoughts grow ... icon_lol.gif
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    May 14, 2009 5:27 AM GMT
    Haha. Nice! icon_lol.gif
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    May 14, 2009 1:26 PM GMT
    Thanks Caslon:

    I have two new books to by appreciate tip!icon_biggrin.gif I''ll let you know what I think when I finish reading them. They will have to stand in line though there are two books ahead of them...lol!
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    May 14, 2009 1:51 PM GMT
    icon_biggrin.gif
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    May 14, 2009 1:51 PM GMT
    Come on Cas, baby. You need to update your GoodReads profile more often icon_biggrin.gif
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    May 14, 2009 9:16 PM GMT
    MunchingZombie saidCome on Cas, baby. You need to update your GoodReads profile more often icon_biggrin.gif

    This book has been listed as my "current-read" ... it will get 5-stars when I finished, I am sure. ... icon_biggrin.gif
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    May 14, 2009 9:21 PM GMT
    Caslon10000 said
    MunchingZombie saidCome on Cas, baby. You need to update your GoodReads profile more often icon_biggrin.gif

    This book has been listed as my "current-read" ... it will get 5-stars when I finished, I am sure. ... icon_biggrin.gif


    Wait until you finish it before you recommend it. Who knows, the whole epilogue could be about how sweet REO Speedwagon was/is.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    May 14, 2009 9:35 PM GMT
    Oh you got me intrigued now.... and no access to books in english icon_confused.gif

    Is it about the rejection of the aristotelian revival in the Incoherence of the Philosophers on the part of the muslims while in the west Aquinus had baptised Aristotle and greek learning? (The irony is that the muslims learnt their philosophy from the Syrian (Nestorian) Christians who were the ones to translate it from Greek into Arabic.) Next time I´m in the USA I might try and get it (or wait to read it in the UK... )
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    May 14, 2009 9:41 PM GMT
    MunchingZombie said
    Caslon10000 said
    MunchingZombie saidCome on Cas, baby. You need to update your GoodReads profile more often icon_biggrin.gif

    This book has been listed as my "current-read" ... it will get 5-stars when I finished, I am sure. ... icon_biggrin.gif


    Wait until you finish it before you recommend it. Who knows, the whole epilogue could be about how sweet REO Speedwagon was/is.

    Well, I was a third of the way thru so I knew it was good. And I always hope that maybe somebody has read it or will start reading it immediately and I might get a discussion before I have moved on to the next book....which could be "The Introvert Advantage: How to thrive in an extrovert world" or "Shakespeare's Wife" or "Washington Burning" ...I dont know. ...I will have to see how I feel and which grabs my interest.

    If this book flops at the end, like "Wicked," I'll let you know.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    May 14, 2009 9:48 PM GMT
    Lostboy saidIs it about the rejection of the aristotelian revival in the Incoherence of the Philosophers on the part of the muslims while in the west Aquinus had baptised Aristotle and greek learning? (The irony is that the muslims learnt their philosophy from the Syrian (Nestorian) Christians who were the ones to translate it from Greek into Arabic.) Next time I´m in the USA I might try and get it (or wait to read it in the UK... )

    Yes, Abu Hamid Muhammed al-Ghazali drove the last nail in Science's coffin in the Islamic world with his books: The Aims of the Philosophers and The Incoherence of the Philosophers. But it also took a turbulent era to put people on edge so that they were receptive to a dogmatic faith-based approach to society and rejection of any rational, scientific approach....enter the Turks who smashed into the islamic world.

    Very cool to see the world from this perspective. ... icon_biggrin.gif