I Could Use Some Help On Packing On Muscle!

  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    May 15, 2009 3:09 PM GMT
    Hey guys,

    I'm trying to add some muscle on me. So far from what I've read it seems that the common recommendation is to have a high protein diet. For me, a high protein diet doesn't agree with my stomach; it starts to kind of ache (maybe I'm just being a wuss). I weigh 170lbs. I can eat about 100-120 grams of protein a day. If I have protein above that, my stomach starts to hurt. I almost feel it's my bodies way of saying I've reached my limit of protein that I can take for the day. I want to add muscle, but I don't want to hurt my body while doing it. I workout 3 days a week using the RJ workout (during my workouts I do 20min cardio). Daily, I eat about 2k calories. 2x a week I walk about 45 min-1 hour. Any help would be appreciated!

    Thx!
    Stephen
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    May 15, 2009 3:15 PM GMT
    Work out (obviously)...

    Sleep (the most frequently ignored factor, no?)

    Wait. It ain´t gonna happen in 2 weeks. Grrr
  • TexanMan82

    Posts: 893

    May 15, 2009 3:16 PM GMT
    It isn't just having a high protein diet. You also need fats and carbs.

    How many calories are you taking in? What does your workout look like? How much sleep are you getting?

    There's a lot that goes into building muscle than just having a "high protein diet"
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    May 15, 2009 4:02 PM GMT
    Lostboy saidWork out (obviously)...

    Sleep (the most frequently ignored factor, no?)

    Wait. It ain´t gonna happen in 2 weeks. Grrr



    Yea, I probably should have a little patience icon_smile.gif
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    May 15, 2009 4:03 PM GMT
    TexanMan82 saidIt isn't just having a high protein diet. You also need fats and carbs.

    How many calories are you taking in? What does your workout look like? How much sleep are you getting?

    There's a lot that goes into building muscle than just having a "high protein diet"


    I'm at about 2k calories a day, workout 3 days a week using the RJ workout & sleep about 7-8/hrs a day. Thx, Stephen
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    May 15, 2009 4:18 PM GMT
    2k ain´t enough.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    May 15, 2009 4:27 PM GMT
    it´s not all about the protein: it´s about a balanced diet, with carbs and other goodies. But more calories I think are needed for a 6 1 28 year old who is planning to work out, if they want to get more muscle.

    Too much protein makes me feel sick, sluggish and generally horrible.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    May 15, 2009 6:26 PM GMT
    To build muscle sports nutritionists recommend 1.6 to 1.7 gms of protein per kilogram of weight daily. The body can only utilize so much protein. Once you exceeded this number the excess protein will be converted to sugars and fats.

    Some sports nutrtionists recommend the following general guidelines
    12-15% of daily calories from protein.
    25-30% of daily calories from fat.
    55-65% of daily calories from carbohydrate.

    You need a good exercise program in addition to diet to gain muscle. As mentioned earlier, adequate sleep is necessary. Muscles grow while you are asleep not while you are exercising. In fact, muscles are being torn down during exercise and are rebuilt bigger and stronger during sleep.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    May 15, 2009 7:13 PM GMT
    I sometimes bring my calories to 4800, or more, when I'm trying to get lean, but eat less when I'm less active. I bring my calories UP to get lean and to sustain a higher level of activity.

    Try eating 6 to 8 times a day with about 5 to 20 grams of fat per meal, 30 to 60 grams of protein per meal, and about 30 to 100 grams of carbs per meal. Be sure to drink plenty of water as you go along which will aid in many ways.

    I weighed 175 pounds at 5'5", at 17, at 12% in HIGH SCHOOL. If I can do that you should be able to do much better than you are. If you consume enough calories you WILL gain, no matter if you're sick, busy, or what.

    Eat.
    Do resistance training.
    Do HIIT.
    Rest.
    Repeat.

    It's that simple.

    Study up on hypertrophy. It may well not be what you thought it was. Size is NOT a function of strength, contrary to what the ignorant will tell you. Size is more a function of local muscular endurance (so to speak). That means perfect form, through a full range of motion, in higher rep ranges with stretching during and after loading.

    Don't forget that carbs are so very important, as well. They provide energy, activate the metabolism, and are protein sparing.

    Mono, and poly, fats are crucial as well.

    Eat. Rest. Stimulate. Repeat.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    May 15, 2009 7:38 PM GMT
    Lostboy saidit´s not all about the protein: it´s about a balanced diet, with carbs and other goodies. But more calories I think are needed for a 6 1 28 year old who is planning to work out, if they want to get more muscle.

    Too much protein makes me feel sick, sluggish and generally horrible.


    Thx for the tips! I appreciate it.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    May 15, 2009 7:39 PM GMT
    kneedraggen saidTo build muscle sports nutritionists recommend 1.6 to 1.7 gms of protein per kilogram of weight daily. The body can only utilize so much protein. Once you exceeded this number the excess protein will be converted to sugars and fats.

    Some sports nutrtionists recommend the following general guidelines
    12-15% of daily calories from protein.
    25-30% of daily calories from fat.
    55-65% of daily calories from carbohydrate.

    You need a good exercise program in addition to diet to gain muscle. As mentioned earlier, adequate sleep is necessary. Muscles grow while you are asleep not while you are exercising. In fact, muscles are being torn down during exercise and are rebuilt bigger and stronger during sleep.


    Thanks for the advice!icon_smile.gif
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    May 15, 2009 7:42 PM GMT
    chuckystud saidI sometimes bring my calories to 4800, or more, when I'm trying to get lean, but eat less when I'm less active. I bring my calories UP to get lean and to sustain a higher level of activity.

    Try eating 6 to 8 times a day with about 5 to 20 grams of fat per meal, 30 to 60 grams of protein per meal, and about 30 to 100 grams of carbs per meal. Be sure to drink plenty of water as you go along which will aid in many ways.

    I weighed 175 pounds at 5'5", at 17, at 12% in HIGH SCHOOL. If I can do that you should be able to do much better than you are. If you consume enough calories you WILL gain, no matter if you're sick, busy, or what.

    Eat.
    Do resistance training.
    Do HIIT.
    Rest.
    Repeat.

    It's that simple.

    Study up on hypertrophy. It may well not be what you thought it was. Size is NOT a function of strength, contrary to what the ignorant will tell you. Size is more a function of local muscular endurance (so to speak). That means perfect form, through a full range of motion, in higher rep ranges with stretching during and after loading.

    Don't forget that carbs are so very important, as well. They provide energy, activate the metabolism, and are protein sparing.

    Mono, and poly, fats are crucial as well.

    Eat. Rest. Stimulate. Repeat.


    Thanks for all of the advice! This is great.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    May 25, 2009 12:43 PM GMT
    I totally agree with what Chucky said, but would elaborate and say that while size is not a function of strength, if you don't increase your weights over time you will find it very hard to gain size. I use a program called Hypertrophy-Specific and it is primarily based on this concept. Keep a log when you work out so that you know you are using more weight. If you can't increase your weight on a given exercise, drop that exercise for a while and move on to something else.

    Also, if a high protein diet is upsetting your stomach, it may be the type of protein you are taking. For example, I used to enjoy a nice big bowl of cereal and milk for breakfast until I started getting stomach cramps and heartburn from it. For some reason, replacing milk with plain non-fat yogurt solved that problem. If you buy a protein powder, look for one with multiple sources, i.e. casein, whey, and egg. No soy.

    Good luck!
  • SFNavigator

    Posts: 62

    May 25, 2009 1:03 PM GMT
    12-15% of daily calories from protein.
    25-30% of daily calories from fat.
    55-65% of daily calories from carbohydrate.

    So all you experts, explain EXACTLY the above formula. Exactly what would be 12-15 % daily calories from protein. What food, how much, how to do measure this etc. You all throw out figures, now tell us what they are and how to do it,
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    May 25, 2009 1:27 PM GMT
    57HandyMan saidI totally agree with what Chucky said, but would elaborate and say that while size is not a function of strength, if you don't increase your weights over time you will find it very hard to gain size. I use a program called Hypertrophy-Specific and it is primarily based on this concept. Keep a log when you work out so that you know you are using more weight. If you can't increase your weight on a given exercise, drop that exercise for a while and move on to something else.

    Also, if a high protein diet is upsetting your stomach, it may be the type of protein you are taking. For example, I used to enjoy a nice big bowl of cereal and milk for breakfast until I started getting stomach cramps and heartburn from it. For some reason, replacing milk with plain non-fat yogurt solved that problem. If you buy a protein powder, look for one with multiple sources, i.e. casein, whey, and egg. No soy.

    Good luck!

    Hey, thx for these great tips!
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    May 25, 2009 1:30 PM GMT
    SFNavigator said12-15% of daily calories from protein.
    25-30% of daily calories from fat.
    55-65% of daily calories from carbohydrate.

    So all you experts, explain EXACTLY the above formula. Exactly what would be 12-15 % daily calories from protein. What food, how much, how to do measure this etc. You all throw out figures, now tell us what they are and how to do it,


    Google, google and... google.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    May 26, 2009 1:33 AM GMT
    haha... I didn't know anyone actually only ate 2000 calories a day. thats really nowhere near enough for a grown man, let alone someone that wants to put on weight and is already 170. shit, if you count beer calories, i'm well over 3k a day...
  • GQjock

    Posts: 11649

    May 26, 2009 11:15 AM GMT
    You have lots of advise from the guys on here
    But if you wanna pack on muscle you have to do two basic things

    Lift and eat
    Lifting heavy weight .... take a look at some of the routines online
    will breakdown the musclefibers but to rebuild them bigger than they are you'll need the excess calories your body will need
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    May 26, 2009 12:45 PM GMT
    I'm in the same boat with trying to pack on some weight, but I'm a recent college graduate so I don't just have unlimited funds to be buying and eating food nonstop. Is there some sort of supplement or cheap food that works best? I know when my parents were getting divorced, my dad was losing a lot of weight and he started taking something to gain weight that he got from GNC. Bad idea? Suggestions?
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    May 26, 2009 1:35 PM GMT
    GQjock saidYou have lots of advise from the guys on here
    But if you wanna pack on muscle you have to do two basic things

    Lift and eat
    Lifting heavy weight .... take a look at some of the routines online
    will breakdown the musclefibers but to rebuild them bigger than they are you'll need the excess calories your body will need


    Agreed BUT lifting heavy means, lifting as heavy as you can WITHOUT SACRIFICING CORRECT FORM. Why? Because when you try and lift beyond what you can do correctly you do two things (1) you change the exercise, as you cannot control the weight. This can be changing the way you move or throwing the weights to rely on momentum to move the iron. Neither helps you. Really. They don´t. (2) You increase the risk of injury. Why? Because you are not in control of the weight.

    lift as heavy as you can do with 100% correct form. This is not something for pedants. This is how you should do it.
  • TexanMan82

    Posts: 893

    May 28, 2009 4:03 AM GMT
    Lostboy said
    GQjock saidYou have lots of advise from the guys on here
    But if you wanna pack on muscle you have to do two basic things

    Lift and eat
    Lifting heavy weight .... take a look at some of the routines online
    will breakdown the musclefibers but to rebuild them bigger than they are you'll need the excess calories your body will need


    Agreed BUT lifting heavy means, lifting as heavy as you can WITHOUT SACRIFICING CORRECT FORM. Why? Because when you try and lift beyond what you can do correctly you do two things (1) you change the exercise, as you cannot control the weight. This can be changing the way you move or throwing the weights to rely on momentum to move the iron. Neither helps you. Really. They don´t. (2) You increase the risk of injury. Why? Because you are not in control of the weight.

    lift as heavy as you can do with 100% correct form. This is not something for pedants. This is how you should do it.


    I completely agree with striving for correct form.

    However, I do believe that "cheating" has its place in bodybuilding. I'll do as many reps as perfectly as I can, but after that, I'll cheat the weight up as many more times as I can. This allows me to push my muscles further than if I just stopped when I couldn't do any more using strict form.

    I also consider myself an intermediate lifter. I can cheat without sacrificing essential muscles being used to stabilize my spine and back. I guess I wouldn't recommend it to a beginner, but others should give it a try.