Cycling Music

  • calibro

    Posts: 8888

    May 15, 2009 11:33 PM GMT
    So I recently was hired as a cycle instructor, a.k.a., the non-trademarked version of Spin. I am in the process of constructing a workout routine, but need some help choosing songs, as I don't want to use stuff only I like, since this is my first class and I don't really know the music preferences of my class yet.

    So what songs would you like to hear in a class? They don't have to be amazingly up-beat, as I need cool, recovery, and warm-up songs, so tempo can vary. Just looking for what you'd want to hear, anything really. Thanks.

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    May 16, 2009 1:57 AM GMT
    I always like Widespread Panic and Grateful Dead, but those are for my rides in the countryside when I want something playful to keep me happy with all them thar hills
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    May 16, 2009 2:02 AM GMT
    How about use your stuff for the 1st class and towards the end of the class or at the beginning, as the CLASS for some of their fav music. It will make them come back and you will be a great instructor for it. icon_cool.gif
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    May 16, 2009 3:12 AM GMT
    Hey,
    I'm a cycle instructor, too. Here's what works for me, I have to feel the music I play so I can give out that energy to my class. I play 80's, 90's, techno, rave, top 40, even some Beatles. Oh, I forgot, I also play rap...the clean versions, of course. At the end of the class I ask people for music suggestions. If the suggestions work, then I play them. If not, I don't.

    Good Luck.
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    May 16, 2009 3:14 AM GMT
    Here are the first few songs on my current spinning playlist:

    Warm-up
    Bicycle Race - Queen icon_biggrin.gif
    Lets Get Ready to Rumble - 2 Unlimited

    Out of the saddle – keepin it aerobic - just:
    Satisfaction - Benassi

    Seated – med hard hill
    SOS – Rihanna

    Anaerobic out of saddle when death approaches – sit & recover (repeat)
    Sweat (Drip Drop Song) – Filly

    Other songs:
    Higher Ground – Stevie Wonder
    Watch Out - Alex Gaudino
    Blink - Dahlback
    We Will Rock You – Queen
    The Boys of Summer - DJ Sammy
    Cha Cha – Chelo
    Don't Stop the Music – Rihanna
    Great Balls of Fire - Jerry Lee Lewis
    Spinning Around - Kylie Minogue
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    May 16, 2009 6:55 AM GMT
    I used this for the last three weeks in my cycling class but I am changing it up for Monday's session.

    Lover's in Japan- Coldplay (warm-up)
    Kiwi- Maroon 5 (increased tensity seated warm-up, out of saddle at 2:30)
    Right Round - Flo-Rida (Seated climb up to level three of 4 level exertion)
    I don't hook up - Kelly Clarkson (Sprint)
    Love Sex Magic - Ciara (out of saddle level 3 false flat, incremental gain)
    CAn't Stop - Maroon 5 (intervals)
    When I grow up - Pussycat Dolls (jumps)
    Sober- Pink (recov and seated false flat)
    It's alright, it's ok - Tisdale (out of saddle standing flat level 3)
    Amazing - Kanye (seated climb to level 4 then 30s out of saddle level 4)
    Closer- Neyo (out of saddle cool down)
    HAlo - Beyoncé (stretch)

    I teach for 45 minutes.

    Best option is to go in with something that matches the exercise you are asking. I can't tell you how many instructors I have evaluated and they play so shitty Reggae for a seated climb or a slow Dave Matthew's Band for a sprint. Go with what sounds good, play it loud and make sure it is full of energy. At the end of class, like any good spinning instructor, ask for recommendations. I usually get 1 request per week and I work it into the next playlist I make.
  • SFGeoNinja

    Posts: 510

    May 16, 2009 10:41 AM GMT
    Two albums produced by Nike specifically for workouts, their rhythms are perfect:


    The Crystal Method - Drive

    A-Trak - Running Man

    You will NOT be disappointed!
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    May 19, 2009 4:48 PM GMT
    Try Coldplay- Viva la Vida for 2 count jumps the entire lenght of the song.
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    May 19, 2009 4:59 PM GMT
    cestfort2000 saidTry Coldplay- Viva la Vida for 2 count jumps the entire lenght of the song.

    2 count jumps? Most spinning instructors don't go below 16. Let me rephrase that, good spinning instructors don't go below 16. 2 counts simulates nothing and just kills the participants knees, hips, and joints.
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    May 19, 2009 5:05 PM GMT
    I must have had all really bad spin instructors then as they've all done 2-count jumps. Can 16-count jumps even be considered jumps?

    My favorite spin song is "True Believer" by E-Type. It's on one of the older RPM CDs. I also really like "Poker Face" by Lady Gaga. It has a great beat to ride along with.

    My favorite spin classes are ones that the instructor picks the music by beats per minute to align with the intended speed of the exercise. It's really hard for me to go fast during a slow song or go slow during a fast song. Some classes I've taken have no apparent relation to the music being played and I just can't get into those.
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    May 19, 2009 5:09 PM GMT
    I found a couple of PODCAST that I've downloaded for when I run or hit the GYM.

    1) http://www.mrblacknyc.com/content/
    2) podrunner on itunes store
    3) Push the Night on itunes store
    4) Radio 538 on itunes store

    All have podcast which are atleast an hour in length.
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    May 19, 2009 5:12 PM GMT
    halltd saidI must have had all really bad spin instructors then as they've all done 2-count jumps. Can 16-count jumps even be considered jumps?

    Traditionally jumps go from 32, 16,8,4,2 but for the past two years every fitness expo I have gone to and every cycling workshop I have done they all emphasize how TERRIBLE it is to do jumps. Most people who teach spinning/cycling classes don't have cycling certs and just do whatever is "hard" to do in and out of the saddle. There has been a very large push at most premier gyms to have cycling instructors cycling cert. It isn't hard, just a little workshop and it earns credits for ACE.

    It is really disheartening to see there are a lot of instructors doing this. Is it a good workout? O hell ya, but they can seriously, seriously injure you.

    Spinning/Cycling class is supposed to simulate the road experience. Jumps NEVER come up in the real world.
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    May 19, 2009 10:31 PM GMT
    Pinny said
    halltd saidI must have had all really bad spin instructors then as they've all done 2-count jumps. Can 16-count jumps even be considered jumps?

    Traditionally jumps go from 32, 16,8,4,2 but for the past two years every fitness expo I have gone to and every cycling workshop I have done they all emphasize how TERRIBLE it is to do jumps. Most people who teach spinning/cycling classes don't have cycling certs and just do whatever is "hard" to do in and out of the saddle. There has been a very large push at most premier gyms to have cycling instructors cycling cert. It isn't hard, just a little workshop and it earns credits for ACE.

    It is really disheartening to see there are a lot of instructors doing this. Is it a good workout? O hell ya, but they can seriously, seriously injure you.

    Spinning/Cycling class is supposed to simulate the road experience. Jumps NEVER come up in the real world.


    Pinny... that's so good to hear. My background is with road cycling, and every spin class I take - they always do jumps (yep, including 2 counts) and then they do this 'hover' thing where they stick their bums out toward the back of the saddle and flatten their backs... Nobody rides on the road like that... I never join in and do that stuff in class.
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    May 20, 2009 2:22 AM GMT
    Anyone want to come to the Caribbean for a week to teach spin? I'd love to attend a good class as the instructors here are teaching all the things just listed as very bad. We always do really short jumps (NEVER done anything more than icon_cool.gif, lots of hovering, and even weird things like unclipping one leg and just using the other leg.

    I love spin classes because I feel like I'm getting a great cardio workout. But, it's disheartening to hear that I'm being taught things that are bad for me.
  • danisnotstr8

    Posts: 2579

    May 20, 2009 2:27 AM GMT
    Off the top of my head--

    "The Trees Were Mistaken" by Andrew Bird
    "49 Percent" by Royksopp
    "Weird Fishes/Arpeggi" by Radiohead
    "The Tunnel" by Pale 3 with Beth Hirsch

    Go stream these free on imeem.com (or any of the other suggestions) and then download only if you think they will work...

    cheers

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    May 20, 2009 2:33 AM GMT
    jtaustin saidMy background is with road cycling,
    Mine too, such an awesome time when you are out on the road biking. Props to you, I have only been an enthusiast for going on 5 years now.

    jtaustin saidathey do this 'hover' thing where they stick their bums out toward the back of the saddle and flatten their backs... Nobody rides on the road like that... I never join in and do that stuff in class.

    Exactly! They call that "Position 3" and instructors always emphasize the further back you push your booty the deeper a burn. Um no, out-of-the-saddle (position 2) and this "hovering" position three work the same muscles you just put a lot more strain on the hip flexors, which God knows we don't need to strain more than we do all day. It is also really awkward.

    The major point is that spinning/cycling classes should reflect a road experience. You wouldn't sign up for a jogging group to have them do odd running drills that simulate nothing come marathon time.

    @Halltd. You are getting a great cardio workout no matter what, but feel free to not listen to the instructor. Hell I give that option to my participants and they occasionally take advantage of it when they know they have knee problems, or stiff hips, etc...

    I actually had two triathletes come to my cycling class for the last two semesters. Both didn't do a damn thing I said. Stayed in the saddle for all 50 minutes. They don't come for the workout, they come for the music, atmosphere, and loud man screaming at the front of the room.

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    Jun 03, 2009 6:18 PM GMT
    Pinny saidThe major point is that spinning/cycling classes should reflect a road experience. You wouldn't sign up for a jogging group to have them do odd running drills that simulate nothing come marathon time.


    Ok... so, keeping in mind that I'm asking this as a relative novice (I've only been taking cycling classes for about 6 months):

    Why is it that these classes should reflect a road experience? That doesn't seem to be the expectation of anyone in the classes I participate in.

    No one seems to regard the classes as intending to prepare them for using a road bike... they're just a means of working out.

    icon_question.gif
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    Jul 14, 2009 2:51 PM GMT
    @Fit.

    Spinning class just like any other class (swimming, running, lifting) reflect what you naturally do in a physical activity. It isn't natural nor beneficial to make the bike some sort of odd apparatus on which we do a-practical moves.

    I could easily come up with various moves on a bike that are cumbersome, put a lot of pressure on leg muscles and burn like crazy but that isn't what we do on a bike, we ride a bike up and down hills and the variation is from resistance, in-out of saddle, and hand positions.

    Spinning class isn't made to make you an outdoor road biker (that is a side affect). It is, like all other good sports-oriented group fitness classes, designed to simulate the real version.

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    Jul 14, 2009 2:53 PM GMT
    ANYTHING BOLLYWOOD WORKS GREAT!!!
    icon_idea.gif
  • outsidein1

    Posts: 4

    Aug 12, 2009 2:42 AM GMT
    I love spin class, but only when one instructor is there. She is monster certified and we never do 2 count jumps. She is a road cylclist and has other roaders join the class. We do jumps, but they are usually 5 up 5 down. I've been in other classes where they do the decending counts, but never liked them and stuck with what works.
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    Aug 12, 2009 2:58 AM GMT
    I am also a spinning instructor, here are a few of my favorites (some them are a bit non-traditional)

    Meatloaf - Paradise by the dashboard light

    Martina McBride - Wild Angels

    Bruce Springsteen - No Surrender

    Diana Ross - The Boss

    Talking Heads - Nothing but flowers

    Ah ha - Take on me

    The Buggles - Video Killed the Radio Star

    Enjoy the ride!
  • calibro

    Posts: 8888

    Aug 12, 2009 3:13 AM GMT
    Pinny said
    jtaustin saidMy background is with road cycling,
    Mine too, such an awesome time when you are out on the road biking. Props to you, I have only been an enthusiast for going on 5 years now.

    jtaustin saidathey do this 'hover' thing where they stick their bums out toward the back of the saddle and flatten their backs... Nobody rides on the road like that... I never join in and do that stuff in class.

    Exactly! They call that "Position 3" and instructors always emphasize the further back you push your booty the deeper a burn. Um no, out-of-the-saddle (position 2) and this "hovering" position three work the same muscles you just put a lot more strain on the hip flexors, which God knows we don't need to strain more than we do all day. It is also really awkward.

    The major point is that spinning/cycling classes should reflect a road experience. You wouldn't sign up for a jogging group to have them do odd running drills that simulate nothing come marathon time.

    @Halltd. You are getting a great cardio workout no matter what, but feel free to not listen to the instructor. Hell I give that option to my participants and they occasionally take advantage of it when they know they have knee problems, or stiff hips, etc...

    I actually had two triathletes come to my cycling class for the last two semesters. Both didn't do a damn thing I said. Stayed in the saddle for all 50 minutes. They don't come for the workout, they come for the music, atmosphere, and loud man screaming at the front of the room.



    I am gonna have to disagree with you on that one. I studied under several master trainers certified in various forms (Spin, 24 cycle, etc...) and they all include jumps. And I have never been in a class that is trying to simulate real world practice; in fact, it's impossible.

    I work as a cycling courier, so I get 6-8 hours of road bike a day. The mechanics of a stationary bike don't allow for the same routine, i.e. there is no counterbalance sagital sway, lock up position of the knee is differently oriented, etc...

    Furthermore, many exercises you'd never do in real life cycling. Forget jumps, there are also isolations, switchbacks, sprints with weight, standing runs/jogs... none of those really happen in the real world unless you're a professional cyclist.

    In theory, jumps are no more unsafe than coming out of the saddle. The problem arises from bad form where people do not have their weight properly distributed and stacked, do not have enough tension on the flywheel, etc... But that happens with anything. In fact, the most common injury I see in classes arises from seated pushes where feet come out of the cages because participants don't understand this is not a real world bike, and that your fly wheel weighs 40 pounds and will pull you if you don't have enough gear. There isn't ever such a thing as a true flat in spin class because of that behemoth of a wheel, which again ties to how the bikes aren't even remotely the same in terms of physics.

    In my advanced classes, I do throw in 2 count jumps (optional as always), but mainly play with 4, 8, and 16. Jumps are a great form of muscle confusion and can be made fairly safe (relative to any other exercise), especially when done on a hill (which yes, you do in real world situations if you have to be on a rolling hill).

    I think the biggest problem with safety in classes is that too many instructors don't understand the physiology of what they're doing. Many have no concept of working at the endurance range of the heart and often push for the anaerobic level too frequently.
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    Aug 12, 2009 3:16 AM GMT
    Thunderstruck by AC/DC is my favourite hill climbing song icon_biggrin.gif

    And all this talk of certification makes me want to go out and get mine....
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    Aug 12, 2009 3:17 AM GMT
    I created an "official" spinning mix a while back for a friend of mine, and here's what was on it:

    1) Black Horse & the Cherry Tree -- KT Tunstall (the album version, not the radio)
    2) I Will Make You Cry -- Nelly Furtado
    3) Eyes Like Yours -- Shakira
    4) A Praise Chorus -- Jimmy Eat World
    5) Hollaback Girl -- Gwen Stefani
    6) Jaded -- Aerosmith
    7) Candyman -- Christina Aguilera
    8 ) Touch of Gray -- Grateful Dead
    9) I Like the Way You Move -- Outkast
    10) The Devil Went Down to Georgia -- Charlie Daniels Band
    11) Move Along -- The All American Rejects
    12) Martyr -- Rusted Root
    13) One Week -- Barenaked Ladies
    14) Drivetime Radio -- Eva Trout
    15) Cantaloop -- US3
    16) Sweet Carolina Rain -- Christian Kane
    17) Don't Stop Believing -- Journey
    18 ) Powerless -- Nelly Furtado

    Really, the only thing that matters is the beat. Fast tempoed, upbeat songs are great for sprints or downhills, the longer songs, more steady (Move Along, Touch of Grey) are good for uphill climbs, and songs such as One Week, with a pretty upbeat but rapid lyrics/melodies are good for going up and down in and out of your saddle.

    Of course, I've had instructors who simply make a mix of current and upbeat pop songs. It's worked alright, but the friend I made the mix for was an instructor who planned each workout, and made CDs accordingly to mirror what she was going to do over the course of the class.

    As an example, if you know these songs, this is how the CD I made was designed to go:

    1) Warm up
    2-3) Heart rate up
    4) Sprint
    5) Jumps
    6) Steady/Begin Uphill
    7-8 ) Uphill
    9) Uphill/Hillcrest
    10) Downhill
    11) Uphill
    12) Downhill
    13) Downhill/Sprint
    14-15) Uphill
    16) Downhill
    17) Even out heart rate/Cool Down
    18 ) Cool Down/Stretch

    Obviously, the mix I created was for a hill day, so I was looking more for long and steady songs.

    Also, keep in mind that the music is really secondary in nature. The energy YOU direct into it will drive and motivate the class. As long as the music sort of goes with what you are trying to do, it's likely that the class will get into it. They just need the music more for the pace setting as opposed to it being the "cool" music.
  • calibro

    Posts: 8888

    Aug 12, 2009 3:37 AM GMT
    syd_hockey_79 saidThunderstruck by AC/DC is my favourite hill climbing song icon_biggrin.gif

    And all this talk of certification makes me want to go out and get mine....


    You should! Can never have too many hottie instuctors... icon_wink.gif Perhaps we can get some sort of realjock cycling cert going where all instructors have to wear extra tight bike shorts icon_twisted.gif