Daydreaming of Warm Sunshine

  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Nov 08, 2007 7:05 PM GMT
    I'm fortunate to live where there's lots of scenic beauty, but summers don't last very long here, and as the weather turns wet and dreary, I find myself daydreaming of warm sunshine and beautiful beaches. Others might dream of snow covered mountains...

    If you could relocate or buy a second home anyplace you wanted -- where would that be?
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Nov 08, 2007 9:52 PM GMT
    opposite problem here, I live in the god-forsaken desert where it's usually sunny and usually hot - but I'm going to SoCal next week for as long as I want and hopefully that'll be a good long while.
  • Multi

    Posts: 21

    Nov 09, 2007 4:54 AM GMT
    Come to the central valley. Most seasons come in either ridiculously hot or annoyingly cold. I say annoyingly because it never gets cold enough to snow. :-(

    If I could move anywhere, I would love to move to a place a little cooler, and wetter.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Nov 09, 2007 5:22 AM GMT
    Ah, the central valley -- ode to multi_masked.

    Actually SoCal has been blanketed by the marine layer lateley and quite gray, cloudy and I suppose not all that inviting, and probably quite Oregon like, but then again the Pacific does influence the whole West Coast of the US.

    If I had to choose maybe something Mediterranean, Hawaii or Bali, or something in South Africa or along the Ease Coast of Africa -- that is as the potentially ideal spot, though I'm not sure that exists.
  • hotversguy

    Posts: 155

    Nov 09, 2007 6:40 AM GMT
    Timely.

    I was in Northern California (where unlike NYC the trees were changing color) for two weeks and came back home to the city, after the time change....

    Argh.... Not that I love CA, but now I understand why all the CA transplants freak out at their first NYC winter.

    Anyway, second home would be in LA, but really it's just a NYC borough with sunshine.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Nov 09, 2007 7:11 AM GMT
    I live in Nevada, so the winter's here are pretty long, cold, and full of snow- I HATE IT! lol. I can't wait to move to Florida next year, where sunshine is of abundance, the breeze is exquisite and the feeling of ultimate freedom is derived from my most favorite place in the world.......the beach.

    - Javi
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Nov 09, 2007 9:42 AM GMT
    Well... it wouldn't be our second home, but we have thought about the island of Naxos in Greece, or maybe Hawaii (a friend owns a place on Oahu's N Shore that is incredible), or Sydney, Aus.

    The truth is though that we like the freedom of having a boat and not being locked into one warm destination when we want to get away. We can take the boat anywhere it is warm and the scenery is new or exciting.

    The next boat will be a motor sailer though for a variety of reasons.

    Maybe when we get closer to actual retirement.
  • Laurence

    Posts: 942

    Nov 09, 2007 10:24 AM GMT
    I live in London. Which is fab for things to do, but has fairly bad seasonal weather. It's either raining and miserable - or miserable and raining.

    Hopefully in the next couple of years I'll be buying a second home in Nice in the South of France, which has lovely warm and sunny weather and lots of lovely french things to do.

    Lozx
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Nov 09, 2007 12:11 PM GMT
    I live in Brighton and it's either windy and wet, or wet and windy so I'm daydreaming about spending Christmas in Florida and wishing the days away...... My first holiday outside Europe and only 44 days to go icon_biggrin.gif
  • thisguy023

    Posts: 204

    Nov 09, 2007 12:25 PM GMT
    I live in Holland (more rain than England!).
    My second house would be in Sitges, just outside Barcelona, Spain.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Nov 09, 2007 12:27 PM GMT
    Buy a house in Bermuda!
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Nov 09, 2007 12:28 PM GMT
    Shameless promotion follows:

    You could always call me for a seasonal stay in southeastern Florida...or buy a vacation condo.

    It is always warm here.

    =)

    Daniel
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Nov 09, 2007 1:14 PM GMT
    Somewhere hot and mediteranian. I hate winter and call snow "The White Death".

  • zakariahzol

    Posts: 2241

    Nov 09, 2007 1:32 PM GMT
    I live in Malaysia the land of eternal summer (according to the tourist brochure). I have 2 house here, if I have my way, my third house will be a little cabin in the wood in North East or Mid West USA. In my fantasy I dream of living there say, one month a year, enjoying the changing seasons, the American festive such as Thankgiving and Halloween. Walking thru the falling fall leaves and those winter wonderland. America that I know and fall in love with 16 years ago.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Nov 09, 2007 4:04 PM GMT
    October is great in Saint Louis Missouri.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Nov 09, 2007 9:06 PM GMT
    Thanks for the replies, everyone! I guess there's good and bad no matter where you go, so it would be hard to find the ideal spot. I'm sure a warm tropical location would be wonderful, but I know I'd miss my favorite hiking trails, first days of spring, and beautiful fall colors. I wouldn't miss winter, though (although I must admit it's fun to watch people trying unsuccessfully to navigate their way down the extremely steep hill I live on after there's been an ice storm).

    I think the ideal situation would be two homes.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Nov 09, 2007 9:08 PM GMT
    My partner and I are planning to move to Woodstock Vermont, but if we could have a second home, it would be in one of the small towns around Provence.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Nov 09, 2007 9:11 PM GMT
    Nantucket.

    Because I miss having four dinstinct seasons, and being near the ocean. Here in relatively landlocked Austin, we get 50 weeks of summer and two weeks of winter. Well...more or less.

    That being said, it has been sunny and above or near 80 nearly every day since the beginning of September. Perfect. People were hitting the swimming holes as recently as a month ago.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Nov 09, 2007 9:22 PM GMT
    I'm tellin' ya - if you wan sunshine, come to PHX - they don't call it, "The Valley of the Sun," for nothin'...

    Phoenix has an arid climate, and its average annual maximum temperature is the highest of any major US city. In fact, out of the world's large urban areas, only some cities around the Persian Gulf, such as Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, and Baghdad, Iraq, and India such as Jaipur have higher average summer temperatures. The temperature reaches or exceeds 100 °F (38 °C) on an average of 89 days during the year, including most days from early June through early September. On June 26, 1990, the temperature reached an all-time high of 122 °F (50 °C).[15] Overnight lows greater than 80 °F occur frequently each summer, with the average July low being 81 °F and the average August low being 80 °F. The all-time highest low temperature was 96 °F (36 °C), which occurred on July 15, 2003.
    The dry desert air makes the hot temperatures more tolerable early in the season, but the influx of monsoonal moisture, which generally begins in early July and lasts until mid-September, raises humidity levels and discomfort due to mugginess. For the most part, the winter months are mild.
    Phoenix averages 85% of possible sunshine[16] and receives scant rainfall, the average annual total at Phoenix Sky Harbor International Airport being 8.3 inches (210 mm). March is the wettest month of the year (1.07 inches or 27 mm) with June being the driest (0.09 inches or 2 mm). Although thunderstorms are possible at any time of the year, they are most common during the monsoon from July to mid-September as humid air surges in from the Gulf of California. These can bring strong winds, large hail, or rarely, tornadoes. Winter storms moving inland from the Pacific Ocean occasionally produce significant rains but occur infrequently. Fog is observed from time to time during the winter months.
    On average, Phoenix has only 5 days per year where the temperature drops to or below freezing.[17] The long-term mean date of the first frost is December 15 and the last is February 1; however, these dates do not represent the city as a whole because the frequency of freezes varies considerably among terrain types and elevations. Frequently, outlying areas of Phoenix will see frost, however, the airport does not. The earliest frost on record occurred on November 3, 1946, and the latest occurred on April 4, 1945. The all-time lowest temperature in Phoenix was recorded at 16 °F (-8.8 °C) on January 7, 1913.