Energy eating and drinking

  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    May 18, 2009 4:13 AM GMT
    I have recently had to change my diet to get rid of certain stimulants in order to lower my blood pressure, and now I have had less then the energy I'd like to, to work out.

    I have had to cut coffee, most sugary snacks/drinks, and most salty snacks as well. Doctor's orders were to cut back on caffeine, high fructose corn syrups, and sodium, which pretty much make up the triad for most energy drinks of performance bars/foods.

    Can anyone help me get the bounce back into my diet?

    Aside from energy, my main dietary goals are to gain lean muscle mass, without worrying heavily on loosing wight. I am 5'10" tall and currently about 145lbs, with a body fat percentage of less then 5%.

    If any of you can think of things I should avoid, then please post that in your reply as well.

    I pretty much stick with low sugar juices and green tea for drinks (aside from water) but snacking is where I am lost.

    I am also the most fatigued when I first wake up. No matter how sound or restful my sleep.

    Thanks
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    May 18, 2009 5:27 AM GMT
    I am just finishing up a six-week transition in diet that has greatly improved my energy...amongst other benefits.

    Basically, I had to cut all dairy products, all grain products, and all refined sugars. One basic rule was if it came with a label on it, I couldnt eat it.

    It was rough for the first few weeks. No coffee in the morning! Damn!

    But also, I was directed to increase vitamin and mineral supplements....one vitamin pill will prevent scurvy but that's about it.

    So what was left to eat....veggies, fruits, nuts, meats, eggs.

    I start my day with freshly made carrot and orange juice with a potent liquid vitamin and FRS (see FRS.com) added.

    I eat a lot of broccoli and cauliflower....very nutrious...and bananas. .... I eat lots of nuts now....cashews and almonds.

    ................

    Also check out this website...

    What Foods are Good for Energy?
    Topics

    Introduction
    How does my body keep energy flowing through my system all of the time?
    How does my body make energy from food?
    Carbohydrates and the glycemic index
    Fats and energy
    Fiber and energy
    Nutrients that support energy transfer and storage
    Phytonutrients that protect cells from imbalanced energy production
    Supporting healthy cells for generating energy
    What is fatigue?
    What can I do to improve my energy and promote my health and vitality?
    Stimulants and alcohol
    Food sensitivities
    Toxins and pesticides
    Hydrogenated fats and saturated fats
    Keys to support healthy energy

    http://whfoods.org/genpage.php?tname=faq&dbid=26#disctopics
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    May 21, 2009 8:10 AM GMT
    Most of the current studies say that daily vitamens and anti-oxidents actually do more harm than good. It all has to do with the way the body functions but a very large study came out last year that said taking vitamens do about nothing and in some cases cause more harm than good. Antioxidents were worse. In pill form they seem to throw the bodies natural defenses off and increase cancer. I read the reports and they are from legitimate sources but I am not a scientist so I do not recall all of the subtle nuances of why they are bad. If anyone cares, I will footnote the sources.

    I personally just try to eat well and my diet is probably 80% vegetables, 10% chips and salsa, and 10% Snickers bars. But that would just be a guess.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    May 21, 2009 7:45 PM GMT
    WebMD has an article about energy foods. You might find it helpful. The article links to several other articles on how to improve energy.
    [http://www.webmd.com/diet/fight-fatigue-energy-foods-6/power-up

    You mentioned blood pressure. If your physician prescribed medications, some of these can cause fatigue. Beta-blockers are notorious for decreasing athletic performance and have recently fallen out of grace. Some physicians still prescribe beta blockers. Salt is not usually thought of as having any relationship to energy. Salt can raise blood pressure so that is why he suggested limiting it's use. Caffeine most certainly does give one energy and can raise blood pressure. Workouts proceeded by caffeine (coffee) are more productive than workouts not proceeded by caffeine. There would be no replacement for caffeine. Fructose is a carbohydrate and a source of energy. Fructose will only raise blood pressure if it would case obesity. Some individuals feel that fructose is the cause of all our ills. This may be exaggerated somewhat to sell newspapers and magazines. Fructose may be the of cause of metabolic syndrome (resistance to insulin). Metabolic syndrome is associated with obesity and you can develop metabolic syndrome without ever consuming fructose. All you need to do is get fat. To confuse the situation further with diabetes and insulin resistance; fructose is recommended over sucrose (table sugar) for diabetics because of its low glycemic index. Fructose has a very low glycemic index of 19 ± 2, compared with 100 for glucose and 68 ± 5 for sucrose. If your physician does not want you to take fructose, then substitute another carbohydrate for energy.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    May 21, 2009 8:01 PM GMT
    Great stuff, knee.

    Now..., if folks would just listen.

    A question for the poster: what's your blood pressure? You're 145# and hypertensive, at 25? You aren't on ADD meds / crap are you?

    I'd check your bp several times.

    Most BP meds, as knee mentions, have some adverse affects, especially beta blockers. My doctor throws beta blockers like atenenol in the trash (literally) because they turn patients into MUSH.

    Did you have blood work? Did the doctor look at your sodium levels?

    Diuretics are often the easiest course of action on bp.

    Then, angiotesin converting enzyme inhibs. (But, you can have few side affects related to working out, muscle, and dry cough.)

    Then, calcium channel blockers. (You could well get real achy if you work out and take CCBs.)

    Although, I've in my 35'th year of working out and have a cholesterol of 135, I had a doctor a few years back that wanted my BP at 115/75. That, I found out, along the way, is really very unrealistic for someone with as much muscle as I carry (nearly 200 pounds). I switched doctors and the first thing the doctor did was to throw (literally) the beta blocker (it'll make you feel like shit), the CCB, and the ACE inhibs. With 12.5mg of HCTZ (a small dose by any standard), and regular cardio, and can maintain 135/84 without any problems. The more cardio I do the lower it gets. (The nutcase doctor wanted three meds, and 25mg HCTZ a day.) My current doctor, as I said, literally threw the ACE inhib, the beta blocker, and the CCB in the trash, and told me the other doctor was a quack.

    I've run into problems with my sodium going LOW, because I eat very little junk. Your body has some interesting reactions when your sodium goes low that can drive your bp right up.

    You need to drink lots of water, do cardio, and stay the heck away from processed food.

    If you start cramping, it's almost always SODIUM, as opposed to potassium that's the culprit. If you sweat a lot, you lose a lot of sodium, and it's essential to your bodily functions.

    Some folks react more to stimulants than others. E.g., I've had friends who can gobble down Adderall 30XR all day, and the thought of touching it makes my brain hurt. A cup of coffee, or two, and I'm wired. I'm one of those folks who seems to retain epinephrine well.

    You need to KNOW what your blood pressure is.

    If your blood pressure is less than 130, I'd go looking for another doctor. Many doctors are clueless about a lot of things. Sometimes you have to find someone who is better.

    If you were on a beta blocker, it will make you feel like crap.

    If you aren't eating enough, you'll feel like crap. If you have low blood sugar in the morning from not eating, you'll feel real bad; like crap. It's important to eat at night so that you can get good sleep and repair, and not wake up feeling bad. Anyone that tells you can't eat late in the evening doesn't know what they're talking about.

    Don't fall into pseudo-science of the "nutrition" store. It's mostly bunk, that's designed to fleece you of your money.

    Have you had a fasting glucose test done? If not, you should have it done. Sometimes, folks have diabetes, and it gets missed.

    There have been a number of studies done on caffeine and bp, and, in regular users those studies show the effects are much better tolerated, with just a brief spike in BP.

    Given your age, and weight, I think I'd get a second opinion.

    So, what's your BP?

    If your eyes start hurting real bad, or you have a nasty, nasty, headache, your BP could be over the top. Keep an aspirin or two around, unless you're allergic to it. If you get in that situation, take the aspirin, or part of it (it could save your life) and head for immediate medical attention.

    BP is nothing to fool around with. You could have a stroke. You could damage your eyes.

    You need to get to the bottom of it.
  • Sparkycat

    Posts: 1064

    May 21, 2009 8:06 PM GMT
    It's odd that a guy your age and weight would have high blood pressure. I'm thinking you should have your adrenal gland function checked. I'm not a doctor. But do some research online about adrenal insufficiency, adrenal fatigue, Addison's disease, etc.


    slimsummers saidI have recently had to change my diet to get rid of certain stimulants in order to lower my blood pressure, and now I have had less then the energy I'd like to, to work out.

    I have had to cut coffee, most sugary snacks/drinks, and most salty snacks as well. Doctor's orders were to cut back on caffeine, high fructose corn syrups, and sodium, which pretty much make up the triad for most energy drinks of performance bars/foods.

    Can anyone help me get the bounce back into my diet?

    Aside from energy, my main dietary goals are to gain lean muscle mass, without worrying heavily on loosing wight. I am 5'10" tall and currently about 145lbs, with a body fat percentage of less then 5%.

    If any of you can think of things I should avoid, then please post that in your reply as well.

    I pretty much stick with low sugar juices and green tea for drinks (aside from water) but snacking is where I am lost.

    I am also the most fatigued when I first wake up. No matter how sound or restful my sleep.

    Thanks
  • Sparkycat

    Posts: 1064

    May 21, 2009 8:12 PM GMT
    Being fatigued when you wake up could be an indication that your cortisol level is low. Cortisol is produced by the adrenals. I don't think you have high blood pressure because of the stimulants you were ingesting. If that was the case then there would be a huge number of people you age with high blood pressure. I think you doctor is treating a symptom of some other medical issue.

    Sparkycat saidIt's odd that a guy your age and weight would have high blood pressure. I'm thinking you should have your adrenal gland function checked. I'm not a doctor. But do some research online about adrenal insufficiency, adrenal fatigue, Addison's disease, etc.


    slimsummers saidI have recently had to change my diet to get rid of certain stimulants in order to lower my blood pressure, and now I have had less then the energy I'd like to, to work out.

    I have had to cut coffee, most sugary snacks/drinks, and most salty snacks as well. Doctor's orders were to cut back on caffeine, high fructose corn syrups, and sodium, which pretty much make up the triad for most energy drinks of performance bars/foods.

    Can anyone help me get the bounce back into my diet?

    Aside from energy, my main dietary goals are to gain lean muscle mass, without worrying heavily on loosing wight. I am 5'10" tall and currently about 145lbs, with a body fat percentage of less then 5%.

    If any of you can think of things I should avoid, then please post that in your reply as well.

    I pretty much stick with low sugar juices and green tea for drinks (aside from water) but snacking is where I am lost.

    I am also the most fatigued when I first wake up. No matter how sound or restful my sleep.

    Thanks
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    May 21, 2009 8:24 PM GMT
    Triggerman is funny, but, right. I've read the same stuff, trigger.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    May 21, 2009 10:56 PM GMT
    Sparkycat saidIt's odd that a guy your age and weight would have high blood pressure. I'm thinking you should have your adrenal gland function checked. I'm not a doctor. But do some research online about adrenal insufficiency, adrenal fatigue, Addison's disease, etc.



    You are correct that cortisol levels can affect blood pressure. Low cortisol levels found in Addison's disease result in low blood pressure. If the person does not receive replacement cortisol the blood pressure will continue to drop until shock occurs. Untreated this will be fatal. President Kennedy had Addison's disease. This was kept from the public until after his death. Elevated cortisol or Cushing's syndrome is associated with elevated blood pressure. Addisonian patients are thin and look wasted. Cushing patients are frequently obese.
    I doubt that cortisol is the problem. In young individuals the physican needs to look for rare causes of hypertension. There are several problems he needs to rule out such as some very rare hormonal disorders (some are related to the adrenals but not related to cortisone), kidney diseases, and blockages of arteries.