Preparing for Climb Up Kilimanjaro

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    May 19, 2009 3:12 AM GMT
    Any one have any advice/links to training for a Mt Kilimanjaro climb. It will be over 19K feet, but no glacier climbing. Mostly trails, so this is all about altitude hiking.

    Any help is appreciated.

    Chris
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    May 19, 2009 6:49 AM GMT
    I climbed Kilimanjaro 4 years ago. It is tough! here are some key points.

    1. The amount of oxygen at the summit is half that at sea level. You feel as if there is no petrol (gas) in the tank.

    2. It is an endurance exercise so you need to train for endurance fitness - you have to keep going.

    3. However, being fit is not a guarantee that you will get to the top. We had a marathon runner who was poleaxed by altitude sickness.

    4. Your energy consumption is huge - you need 5 to 6000 calories a day.

    5. You rapidly get dehydrated so you need to drink 4-5litres a day - your urine needs to be pale and lots off it.

    6. it is cold at night and when you climb the summit - so get the right kit.

    7. If you are fit and the altitude sickness is not too bad ( if you get it) getting to the summit is a psychological battle. Sheer determination and positive thinking is really important.

    8. You are likely to get some altitude sickness but mild pain killers and anti sickness drugs usually keep it under control. The use of diamox is controversial - I took it for the summit bid.

    If this all sounds a bit scary - it was the most fantastic trip I have ever done. Standing almost 20,000ft above Africa and watching the sun come up was unforgettable (despite the fact that I was throwing up!). The folk I did it with were amazing too - there was a tremendous spirit of friendship and support even though we had never met.

    Go for it - and have a fabulous time.
  • zakariahzol

    Posts: 2241

    May 19, 2009 11:57 AM GMT
    The highest I ever climb is 2k some 10 year ago. Anyway good luck to you
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    May 19, 2009 7:07 PM GMT
    devontrainer said
    You are likely to get some altitude sickness but mild pain killers and anti sickness drugs usually keep it under control. The use of diamox is controversial - I took it for the summit bid.
    .

    I have heard of altitude sickness but was not familiar with the symptoms. From an article I read it seems very common. 1/4 of vacationing Colarado skiers develop it as well as 2/3 of Mount Ranier climbers. I had a friend develop a mild form of it while in the Andes. He had to descent to a lower altitude.
    I always wish that I could have had an adventure like this. Now I'm over the hill and just to oldicon_cry.gif Have a great time!
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    May 20, 2009 11:33 AM GMT
    I had a friend that climbed it and he ended up carrying his guide. Fact is that no one ever knows how these adventures are going to go. So sign on, make it happen and tell us your tales afterword. Nobody is ever guaranteed, fame, glory or even success on any endeavor, it's the ability to accept the challenge that sets people apart. Not the guarantee of success. If that was the case, we'd all be heroes. Go for it and those lessons will be with you forever!
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    May 26, 2009 2:57 AM GMT
    kneedraggen said
    devontrainer said
    You are likely to get some altitude sickness but mild pain killers and anti sickness drugs usually keep it under control. The use of diamox is controversial - I took it for the summit bid.
    .

    I have heard of altitude sickness but was not familiar with the symptoms. From an article I read it seems very common. 1/4 of vacationing Colarado skiers develop it as well as 2/3 of Mount Ranier climbers. I had a friend develop a mild form of it while in the Andes. He had to descent to a lower altitude.
    I always wish that I could have had an adventure like this. Now I'm over the hill and just to oldicon_cry.gif Have a great time!


    Who is telling you that you are too old? The last time I climbed Pike's Peak (14,110), my hiking buddy was a 67-year-old man who had been a smoker for over forty years. The final two thousand feet of elevation gain were a significant challenge for him. We had to make frequent stops to catch our breath, and for the last thousand feet I never let him out of my sight for a second in case he collapsed. But you know what? He made it all the way up.

    I know I'm just some stranger on the Internet, but I would suggest you change your thinking from "I'm getting too old to have an adventure" to "I'm getting too old NOT to have an adventure". You'll never again have as much life left as you have right this second, and that will be true the next second, and the next, and the next. It might take you longer to get into endurance shape, and you might not be able to ascend Kilimanjaro, but there are hundreds of smaller peaks right here in the United States. Don't give up on your own personal adventure whatever form it may take. It's never too late until you're in the ground.
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    May 26, 2009 3:23 AM GMT
    devontrainer saidI climbed Kilimanjaro 4 years ago. It is tough! here are some key points...



    I am impressed by your achievement. If I may ask, how long did you take for the ascent? How much gear (weight) were you carrying? Was this trip done through an outiftter or did you arrange the details yourself?
  • Sparkycat

    Posts: 1064

    May 26, 2009 3:37 AM GMT
    This is in no way a criticism. I admire your ambition. But, I have to ask why do such a thing? What's the point? It doesn't register in my brain. Of course, my idea of adventure is having two slices of lemon in my iced tea instead of one.icon_smile.gif
  • coolarmydude

    Posts: 9190

    May 26, 2009 3:38 AM GMT
    No need to pack the snowshoes any more. icon_sad.gif
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    May 27, 2009 7:51 PM GMT
    Get prescription Diamox. I needed it 4 years ago when I climbed Kilimanjaro. At 13000 feet I started to have a pounding headache in the camp. After taking diamox daily I was able to do it although still didn't have good appetite.

    We hired porters and you are required to hire a guide (you can arrange this locally when you arrive). I was just carrying a small daypack with some clothes, snacks, and water. The porters carry everything else. We took 5 days total, 4 days up 1 day down.

    [quote][cite]explorer said[/cite]I had a friend that climbed it and he ended up carrying his guide.

    That must not be a local Tanzanian guide? I just can't imagine that being needed for a local guide.