So body weight and light weight routines

  • Artesin

    Posts: 482

    May 23, 2009 4:40 AM GMT
    When i first started working out I thought that it was all lift with nothing but heavy weight but since then I've done some experimenting. So far I've found that I love body weight workouts and light weight (Say a 20 lb barbell for every upper body workout when Im just hanging around at home without much acess to better equipment) and my joints love it too. Problem is that I don't know if I could ever get to my goal doing this. However, is it not safe to say that any weight could make a considerable difference if the weight is held at the flex point for longer periods of time?

    If I wanted to build bigger arms and upper back muscles with this what could I do? My primary crutch is the iron gym for pull ups and push ups, which has seemed to make a pretty big difference but how could I alter some of my routines to get more out of them?

    Should I aim for circuits and exhaust my muscles or hold the weight at the flex point for longer... or both? I just want to get stronger and build my endurance overall but if I could build some mass in conjunction with meeting those goals thatd be stellar
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    May 23, 2009 11:50 AM GMT
    Well quite frankly I agree with your technique. I will say this, to get more out of your routine, I believe you could step up your technique with supersets.
    So...for example, do a set of pushups, followed by some type of tricep exercise...go to failure with both.
    Same with Pullup...do a set of some sort of bicep exercise immediately after.
    if you work out at gym that has strength training classes...take one. The reason being is guys think they are just for women, big mistake. Those classes are high endurance classes and they challenge you in ways you never thought possible.
    Another recommendation is boot camp type workouts...which put you through high endurance training.

    guys need to break out of the mentality of just heavy lifting. it should be a blending of heavy lifting and high endurance exercise.

    It absolutely drives me crazy when I hear guys say..."i am in my bulking phase"...what is that? or "I am in my shredding phase"...huh?

    no...you can do both, bulk and shred at the same time. Heavy lifting to put on size...high endurance to burn and shape.

    that is my advice from a trainer perspective!!!

    good luck!!
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    May 23, 2009 12:09 PM GMT
    most people lift heavier than they can and make up for it by throwing the weights around, using momentum to make up for the fact that they are overdoing it. If you move the weight slowly (not super slow, but controlled at all times) then you will get a much deeper workout. Pull ups will do a lot to give you a bigger back and there are lots of pushup variants, culminating in handstand pushups...

    Bodyweight is great ;)
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    May 23, 2009 12:12 PM GMT
    tommyboy10 saidWell quite frankly I agree with your technique. I will say this, to get more out of your routine, I believe you could step up your technique with supersets.
    So...for example, do a set of pushups, followed by some type of tricep exercise...go to failure with both.
    Same with Pullup...do a set of some sort of bicep exercise immediately after.
    if you work out at gym that has strength training classes...take one. The reason being is guys think they are just for women, big mistake. Those classes are high endurance classes and they challenge you in ways you never thought possible.
    Another recommendation is boot camp type workouts...which put you through high endurance training.

    guys need to break out of the mentality of just heavy lifting. it should be a blending of heavy lifting and high endurance exercise.

    It absolutely drives me crazy when I hear guys say..."i am in my bulking phase"...what is that? or "I am in my shredding phase"...huh?

    no...you can do both, bulk and shred at the same time. Heavy lifting to put on size...high endurance to burn and shape.

    that is my advice from a trainer perspective!!!

    good luck!!


    As a PT in the UK I totally agree. Muscular fitness is abut strength and endurance. That way you look good too.
  • SFNavigator

    Posts: 62

    May 23, 2009 1:50 PM GMT
    The rule of thumb I have learned and read about is that when you lift light weights with a lot of reps it builds defination and muscle. When you lift heavy weights you are doing it for strength. I rotate these two every three months. If you want big muscle try doing 5 sets, 30 reps each, you will notice a huge difference in 4 weeks--I did. My pecs exploded doing this with bench flyes with just 25# weights.
  • ftwcycle

    Posts: 111

    May 25, 2009 3:30 AM GMT
    I cant say how many times I come to RJ to ask a question and see it has just been discussed.

    This is a great example...before I joined a gym, this is how I worked out at home and I really enjoyed it. Once I got into the gym, this style of working out went out the window. I have varied the routine a few times and find myself wanting to get back to a light weight heavy rep workout but wondered about its effectiveness for obtaining true fitness. I've been wanting to change things up, and it looks like I have. Thanks for the thoughtful advice, guys.
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    May 25, 2009 5:33 AM GMT
    You said you were a swimmer in another thread if I'm not mistaken? Well in that case you know that you won't see results by doing the same things over and over again. In order to see results at the gym, you have to keep your muscles guessing as to what's coming next. I get into a rut when I'm in a competitive running season where I do 4x15s for every single exercise, and I don't work towards increasing the weight or shocking my body into change. The result...I'll actually lose strength. Tommyboy has a good post. Also my thought is that rather than holding anything at a flex, is that you concentrate on lifting slowly, briefly flexing, and then bringing it back down slowly so your muscles are working. I notice that a lot of the guys in my gym who lift heavy are just kind of jerking the weights around. It seems to work for some of them, but I know it's not the right way to lift. Maybe they're just genetically blessed...haha.
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    May 27, 2009 12:29 AM GMT
    It depends on goals...

    If bulking is the goal then heavy weight is needed.

    If specific-sport performance is the goal, then you're close to doing all the right things. However, for specific-sport performance, some over-weight/high resistance work can sometimes lift you to another level.

    Still, keep in mind that if your goal is to perform well in a given sport:

    - Exercises should resemble your sport in rage of movement, speed of movement and in muscle combination - this is called specificity.
    - Better sport results are often related to increased speed and/or explosiveness of the exercise: try doing your body-weight exercises faster, or with more "pop".

    When I was in sports as a professional, the greatest athletes did a lot of body-weight work; the also-ran's often got distracted into bulking and didn't improve. Among other things, swimmers, runners, skiers, etc. don't want to have to move more weight - they want to move less weight faster.

    Nat
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    May 27, 2009 11:50 PM GMT
    I''m assuming since this is the Strength Training forum that you want to get stronger. I think it should be obvious from your thread title that this is not the approach to use. Your muscles get stronger in response to progressive resistance. Bodyweight and "light weight" workouts are not appropriate. You will get stronger, but only up to a point.