back surgery

  • ZakNPB

    Posts: 1

    Jan 17, 2007 1:21 PM GMT
    Got some crappy news after having an MRI done recently. There is a tumor in my back around the L3 vertibrae. I was told yesterday it is thought to be a "Schwanomma" and that it is most likely a benign tumor. Further was told that this is very rare and not a lot is known about it. Was wondering if anyone would have any input on it. Rory
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    Jan 22, 2007 9:26 PM GMT
    I'm not familiar at all with this but I know people who have had back surgery. They can surely do amazing things these days. Keep us posted please!
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    Jan 23, 2007 4:57 PM GMT
    http://www.cancerhelp.org.uk/help/default.asp?page=6215

    A schwannoma (sh-won-oma) is a tumour of the tissue covering nerves, called the nerve sheath. These tumours develop from a type of cell called a Schwann cell, which gives them their name. Schwannomas are often not cancerous (benign). The commonest type of benign schwannoma is the acoustic neuroma. This can cause deafness because it grows on a nerve called the 8th cranial nerve, which controls hearing.
    ...
    Treatments include surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy. Because these tumours are so rare, it is difficult to find information about them. One review of 54 patients with this type of nerve tumour treated over the last ten years found that the people likely to do best

    Had tumours smaller than 5cm across
    Were able to have their tumours completely removed
    Tended to be younger rather than older
    ...
    These tumours don't respond all that well to chemotherapy. This treatment may be used to try to shrink the tumour or keep it at bay, but it is unlikely to cure it. They may respond well to radiotherapy, but unfortunately, there is a limit to the amount of treatment you can have to any one part of the body. If you have too much it will damage the normal tissue in the area.


    Hmmmmmm I wonder how they get the tumor out without injuring the nerve. Do you know?
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    Jul 11, 2007 1:55 PM GMT
    Zak
    I am not a doctor. There ought to be a neurosurgeon that can take the time to explain the type of tumour you have and the possible treatment modalities:
    (is it operable? kinda thing then move down to the next level of treatment(chemo/radiation).

    as was said earlier if the tumour is entangled in the nerve at the L3 level((check the dermatome diagrams to illustrate where L3 innervates the leg)). if you have been experiencing shooting pain/burning sensations or alteration in sensation like numbness in one leg or both-the surgery helps resolve the issue-however there is risk, ie scar tissue at the surgical site post procedure, etc.

    Talk to a neurosurgeon.

    Chicago Institute of Neurosurgery and Neuroresearch CINN has a website. google CINN

    I am glad you have had a MRI-expect to have a subsequent MRI's (then can do these intraoperative as well to make sure all the tumour has been removed).
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    Jul 11, 2007 1:55 PM GMT
    Zak
    I am not a doctor. There ought to be a neurosurgeon that can take the time to explain the type of tumour you have and the possible treatment modalities:
    (is it operable? kinda thing then move down to the next level of treatment(chemo/radiation).

    as was said earlier if the tumour is entangled in the nerve at the L3 level((check the dermatome diagrams to illustrate where L3 innervates the leg)). if you have been experiencing shooting pain/burning sensations or alteration in sensation like numbness in one leg or both-the surgery helps resolve the issue-however there is risk, ie scar tissue at the surgical site post procedure, etc.

    Talk to a neurosurgeon.

    Chicago Institute of Neurosurgery and Neuroresearch CINN has a website. google CINN

    I am glad you have had a MRI-expect to have a subsequent MRI's (then can do these intraoperative as well to make sure all the tumour has been removed).