ultimate age for fitness

  • gallus81

    Posts: 350

    May 30, 2009 1:41 AM GMT
    what are your thoughts on the ultimate age (or age range) for fitness?

    I'm 28, and like to think I'm pretty fit, but hate the feeling that perhaps this is the fittest I'll ever be and everything from here on will be down-hill.

    I know when I was 18 I had far fewer injuries and recovered faster, but don't think I was nearly as fit then as I am now. I know a number of guys older than me (in their 40's, 50's and 60's) who are still fit --- some of them kick my ass in regards to fitness --- so I have faith that I won't suddenly loose it all when I hit 30 ... plus, after seeing guys like Dino Hillas http://queer-on-sea.blogspot.com/2008/11/dino-hillas-1.html I figure I'll possibly be ever fitter in 20 years than I am now.

    of course genetics, motivation, etc all play a role in how fit you are, and age shouldn't be _too_ much of a barrier, but it'd be interesting to see what others think.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    May 30, 2009 2:49 AM GMT
    36 plus or minus. My best age. Stronger than hell, in the best shape of my life, outside of today...lol. Better cardio now, stronger then.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    May 30, 2009 2:52 AM GMT
    I could be as strong now, maybe, but I do not want to powerlift anymore. Gay guys into their forties if they never stop working out.
  • olden

    Posts: 194

    May 30, 2009 4:18 AM GMT
    I was at my strongest in my early 40s when I was playing at being a power lifter. But now as I approach 70, I am in better all around physical condition than I probably have been since college. The ultimate age for fitness is from when you start working at being fit until you stop. If you are lucky that could be all the way from 16 to 100.
  • gallus81

    Posts: 350

    May 30, 2009 6:48 AM GMT
    aurevoir said
    You are only concerned about fitness because you have nothing else going for you. You are vain. This is a vain thread.

    We all get older eventually. The best thing you can do is try to be as healthy as you possibly can and grow comfortable with your body's inevitable deterioration and death.

    -aurevoir



    impressive interpretation of my question/thread.

    I'm bored now ... off to the gym.
  • CuriousJockAZ

    Posts: 19138

    May 30, 2009 6:49 AM GMT
    I'm stronger now than I have ever been -- go figure.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    May 30, 2009 6:53 AM GMT
    Personally, as I get older I find that my level of fitness keeps increasing as does my enthusiasm for keeping fit. I think the key to maintaining fitness is to start training for longevity as early as possible.
    This type of training involves a keen sense of what my abilities and limitations are. In my 20's and 30's I was all about the "go big or go home" mentality and "how much can you bench?" for which I was awarded various injuries and ailments. I didn't want to end up crippled for the sake of this mentality so I had to change my direction.
    These days I focus on researching sensible training excercises/routines(many of which I've found here on RJ), experimenting with them and using the ones that work best for me. Focusing on strengthening things like core and weak links like rotator cuffs and post lift stretching is what keeps me able to enjoy excercise well into my 40's and I'm sure for many years to come.
  • gallus81

    Posts: 350

    May 30, 2009 8:53 AM GMT
    aurevoir said
    I think you're just off, personally. But then again I have only a vain, insecure thread upon which to base my assumptions (which is enough for me, although it may not be for you).

    -aurevoir



    and all I need is the air that I breath, and to love you ... which I do Mr Aurevoir.

    I truly do.
  • Little_Spoon

    Posts: 1562

    May 30, 2009 9:11 AM GMT
    aurevoir said
    gallus81 said
    aurevoir said
    I think you're just off, personally. But then again I have only a vain, insecure thread upon which to base my assumptions (which is enough for me, although it may not be for you).

    -aurevoir



    and all I need is the air that I breath, and to love you ... which I do Mr Aurevoir.

    I truly do.


    Don't try that ish with me. It doesn't work.


    You're so angry...

    Can't we all just get along Aurevoir.

    It might not be the right time. I might not be the right one. But there's something between us, I want to say
    Cause there's something between us anyway.
  • gallus81

    Posts: 350

    May 30, 2009 9:13 AM GMT
    DanielH said
    You're so angry...

    Can't we all just get along Aurevoir.

    It might not be the right time. I might not be the right one. But there's something between us, I want to say
    Cause there's something between us anyway.


    icon_razz.gif

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    May 30, 2009 9:52 AM GMT
    http://www2.macleans.ca/2009/05/07/how-healthy-are-you-2/

    Timmerman is 100 years old, he began swimming competitively when he was 80. He still competes in Masters events as a centenarian. Couldn't find a pic of him, but if you can find one take a look, he sure does not look 100 years old.

    Right age? I sure as hell don't know, but i sure hope i'm as active as this guy is when i'm 100 icon_smile.gif
  • gallus81

    Posts: 350

    May 30, 2009 11:36 AM GMT
    olden saidThe ultimate age for fitness is from when you start working at being fit until you stop. If you are lucky that could be all the way from 16 to 100.


    it's a good point ... i guess if you just don't stop, if you decide to keep on training regardless of age, then, other than the obvious slow-downs, age isn't such a barrier ... I've read a few times that people can continue to increase their flexibility until around the age of 60-65 ... but that doesn't mean it decreases after that age; if you have it, you can maintain it for as long as you keep on working it (I'm guessing).

    To be honest, I'm looking forward to training as I grow older as part of maintaining a healthy life, and working on that all important 'quality of life' that so many elderly people talk about (glad they have / wish they had). Plus those guys in their 50's/60's with their well-cared-for physiques and salt 'n' pepper hair are really starting to appeal ...
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    May 30, 2009 1:31 PM GMT
    No, it's over. Kiss your sweet, fit ass good-bye! ... icon_rolleyes.gif
  • Timbales

    Posts: 13993

    May 30, 2009 1:34 PM GMT
    One the things the owner of my gym, a former competitive bodybuilder, has said to me is that he envies me a little bit because I am continuing to improve and haven't reached my 'peak' at 39, and he'll never be as strong and able as he once was.
  • gallus81

    Posts: 350

    May 30, 2009 1:50 PM GMT
    Caslon10901 saidNo, it's over. Kiss your sweet, fit ass good-bye! ... icon_rolleyes.gif


    ahhh ... a good old reality check. many thanks. icon_smile.gif
  • Matia79

    Posts: 215

    May 30, 2009 2:01 PM GMT
    I'm 30 and never been fitter. I can also tell you that I know I'll be fitter in the upcoming years. My best friend is 44 and, like me, has never been fitter either and is still on the rise.

    I think seeing age as a barrier for fitness level is somewhat self-defeatest. It's true, as we age our bodies respond differently - but by adjusting to those changes accordingly you can still achieve amazing results in your fitness levels.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    May 30, 2009 2:05 PM GMT
    Having spent most of my life making excuses for why I wasn't "fit" -- things like genetics, stress, work schedules etc., I am now, at age 62, more "fit" than I have ever been in my life. Although acheiving fitness as we age has it's obvious physical aspects, I think it begins with a positive and realistic mental attitude and outlook regarding things we can control. Most older men I see are much less active than they were when younger, and many haven't decreased their caloric intake to match that reduced activity level. So their overall fitness level decreases. Through discipline and habit, though, that can change, at least it has for me. As I have became more disciplined and habitual about my calories in through healthy eating and calories out through exercise, my fitness level has increased. No reason that can't continue as I continue to age.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jun 02, 2009 9:44 AM GMT
    Yeow-

    I guess any thread on here can get bitchy. Even a simple question like when you were most fit.

    More power to the positive answers. To the negative, rough life, huh? Being negative constantly? That will age you, definitely.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jun 02, 2009 12:46 PM GMT
    i have had more beef...I leaned up and I like it better personally. Now I feel just fine....ripped and I have small waist line. You know this when girls say hey...you have a smaller waist than I do...LOL....dam right.


    Most men do not peek and or mature until at least 35. Many men on mens mags...are over 35 and most photographers want guys buffed up and then really cut up lean. Not an easy job~
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jun 02, 2009 12:54 PM GMT
    well, do you mean 'fitter' or more easily able to recover/change your body?

    in your 20s there's no doubt you have more potential...as far as ability to recover from strenuous activity, and along with that your ability to improve your body.

    all of that slows down in your 30s...but if you're putting more work into your body in your 30s then of course, you'll be 'fitter.'

    I guess its all a matter of exactly what you're asking along with how much work you're willing to do.

    I'm fitter now than when I was in my 20s, but when I was in my 20s I didn't work out this hard either. During those times when I was working out hard then, I did recover much quicker.


    oh and what's up with that aurevoir dude? is he the dude you turned down at the club last weekend? dude has issues...
  • gallus81

    Posts: 350

    Jun 08, 2009 11:45 AM GMT
    tommysguns2000 saidwell, do you mean 'fitter' or more easily able to recover/change your body?

    in your 20s there's no doubt you have more potential...as far as ability to recover from strenuous activity, and along with that your ability to improve your body.

    all of that slows down in your 30s...but if you're putting more work into your body in your 30s then of course, you'll be 'fitter.'

    I guess its all a matter of exactly what you're asking along with how much work you're willing to do.

    I'm fitter now than when I was in my 20s, but when I was in my 20s I didn't work out this hard either. During those times when I was working out hard then, I did recover much quicker.


    oh and what's up with that aurevoir dude? is he the dude you turned down at the club last weekend? dude has issues...



    I realise that as we age it becomes harder to recover from injuries, etc, and the body generally slows down, and I guess that's part of the reason it 'seems' guys get stronger into their 30s and 40s; because they took certain things for granted in their 20s and now they're older, they know they have to work harder for similar results, and (possibly) end up with even better results ...

    as for Aurevoir; no idea ... came out of the blue to be honest, and I had to laugh as I simply had (and still have) no idea what he's on about ... glad I'm not the only one who found it perplexing.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jun 08, 2009 1:45 PM GMT
    Don%27t%20feed%20the%20troll.jpg

    He´s made similarly helpful comments on several other threads.

    I am a lot fitter in my early 30s than I was in my early 20s. I reckon, being realistic, that if i work hard and rest and eat well I can continue improving for another 10 years, and then hopefully sustain that for a while hehe.. well having ambitious goals doesn´t hurt

    ;)
  • MikemikeMike

    Posts: 6932

    Jun 08, 2009 4:22 PM GMT
    ok 40's and strongest I have ever been!!icon_smile.gif
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jun 08, 2009 5:56 PM GMT
    Talking about fitness on the sub-forum labelled "Fitness" is vain?

    Even by the obvious standards of a gay men's site called "RealJock"?

    Really?
  • MSUBioNerd

    Posts: 1813

    Jun 08, 2009 6:17 PM GMT
    It depends both on you as a person (both your training and your genetics), and how you're measuring fitness. What's the important measurement here? How much weight you can lift? How fast you can run 100 meters? 3 miles? A marathon? How far you can swim before running out of steam? What your body fat percentage is? How fast you recover from disease? How sore you are the day after a 20 mile bike ride? Different measurements will peak at different ages.

    As a general rule of thumb, recovery time is faster when you're younger--it starts going downhill around age 19 or so. Strength continues to increase through the early to mid 20s for most naturally, and can be extended by proper conditioning. Peak performance for swimming often comes in the mid 20s, but sprinters have a very long window (see: Dara Torres). Peak performance for distance running or biking often comes in the mid to late 30s. Most sports have a strong skill component to them--even ones we think of as being mostly about fitness, like running--and elite athletes will therefore continue to improve in their chosen specialty even if they don't have the sheer muscular force that they used to have.