Trap pain

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    May 31, 2009 10:34 PM GMT
    My right trap is giving me a lot of trouble.

    I saw a doctor and he prescribed Carisoprodol that I am supposed to take three times a day. It does help until it wears off and feels like the pain is not going away. He also prescribed Naproxen which I am refusing to take since it may cause an increase risk of a heart attack. My blood pressure is high enough that I feel it is warranted not to take it. I was told not to take any aspirin or Ibprophen while on it but can't remember if it was due to the Carisoprodol or the Naproxen.

    Does anyone know of any light stretches that might help or should I just try not to do anything for it? The pain seems greatest after I have laid down or slept.
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    May 31, 2009 11:11 PM GMT
    work more upper back to compensate for building traps up.

    many physios get bodybuilder in with huge traps complaining of pain, all they can do is massage it and tell them to work the back more to counterbalance the traps.
  • Timbales

    Posts: 13993

    May 31, 2009 11:23 PM GMT
    Have you considered PT? there may be more going on than you think.
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    May 31, 2009 11:44 PM GMT
    I would vote with Tim and chino M: doctors know very little about muscles. I´m seeing a physio-trainer now and am SO glad I did. He´s working through a pile of issues and it´s better to do it before you get injured badly. (in my case it was my shoulders)

    Edit to clarify: my "physio trainer" is a physical therapist who works primarily though supervised exercise. To start with he does the normal massage/poking stuff, but moves onto rebalancing the body. Ice is a short term (first 24 hours) way of decreasing inflamation.
  • barriehomeboy

    Posts: 2475

    Jun 01, 2009 1:53 AM GMT
    You need a pharmacist, not a personal trainer.
  • Timbales

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    Jun 01, 2009 1:54 AM GMT
    When I said PT I meant physical therapy.
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    Jun 01, 2009 1:55 AM GMT
    ICE it broicon_lol.gif
  • barriehomeboy

    Posts: 2475

    Jun 01, 2009 2:21 AM GMT
    physical therapy won't help this guy anymore than an personal trainer
  • DCEric

    Posts: 3713

    Jun 01, 2009 2:31 AM GMT
    can't contain self.... geek emergency override...
    itsatrap.jpg
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jun 01, 2009 2:54 AM GMT
    Too bad you don't live in Atlanta. I'd take care of it. All doctors can do is prescribe you pain medication to mask the symptom. They're not going to tell you to go to a massage therapist to solve the problem. They don't make any money that way.
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    Jun 01, 2009 3:37 AM GMT
    Try laying off. Try some massage. Likely you have a sprain, or maybe a tear, which only a doctor can really test for.

    Take some time off.

    Consider your muscle balance.

    All muscles need to be worked and you need to stay in balance.
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    Jun 01, 2009 4:36 AM GMT
    There's a lot of information missing here. When did you first notice this issue? Did it begin with a traumatic event or sneak up on you over time? Do your workouts include overhead lifts or shrugs? Is there any new activity in your daily routine (for example: painting ceilings, pitching baseballs)? The problem was bad enough that you saw a doctor, but you didn't report what his diagnosis was. Why the NSAID and the muscle relaxant? The pain is worst after sleeping. Are you lying on the injured shoulder or sleeping with one arm overhead? Physical therapy, massage, medical intervention, workout modifications -- any (or all) of these may be helpful, but no one here online can make a legitimate diagnosis. Perhaps returning to the doctor may be the quickest way to recovery. Get him to clarify his diagnosis. Ask for a referral to a physical therapist (which you may need if you decide to go that route). Talk to friends to find a qualified massage therapist or check websites like www.amtamassage.org or www.ncbtmb.org to find therapists in your area. Ask questions. Get answers.
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    Jun 01, 2009 5:17 AM GMT
    I agree.... you want to find out what is causing it because taking relaxants and pain killers is just masking the problem, not making it go away. If it is local to just one side then that's usually a compensation injury. It would be a good idea to find out when it started. It could be a workout that is causing it, especially if your form is wrong or you are compensating because of weaker areas.

    Get a massage therapist and/or physio to check out your range of motion or your shoulder workout technique. They will be able to tell you what's going on and how to fix it up. I treat injuries like this all the time and it's such a shame the amount of doctors who are just do quick to give medication as a "cure".. it just bandaids the problem and it in fact makes it worse because you are now not just injuring yourself even more, you are numbing those receptors that your body relies on to tell you you're damaging your muscles.

    Get it treated by those who specialize in this area. ;)
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    Jun 01, 2009 5:24 AM GMT
    I would definitely recommend at least trying a deep tissue massage somewhere. Just tell them what you've been dealing with, and a good one will know how to handle it. I won't dare say they'll "be gentle"; that's not really what they do in a deep tissue, after all. ;D But they'll know to take special care around that area so as not to wound the muscle further.

    Afterwards (and they'll probably tell you this), soak in a hot bath in a combination of epsom and sea salts for a good half hour, and try to continue doing so after each work out.

    I was having some lower back and arm troubles, so I did all this. It hurts while you're on the table, but you walk out feeling like $1m!!

    Hope that helps.
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    Jun 01, 2009 11:42 AM GMT
    Frequently pain and spasm in the trapezius is not from an injury but is related to stress or posture. Tension headaches are associated with pain in this area. Fibromyositis which is related to stress, poor sleep and so forth can cause unrelenting discomfort in the trapezius area. Individuals who lean over a desk all day can have pains in this area. Stress related and posture related problems respond well to chiropractic treatments, physical therapy and message therapy. Muscle relaxants don't work well. To be effective, muscle relaxants doses have to be pushed so high that all you will do is sleep. Muscle relaxants are tranquilizers. Valium is probable one of the best relaxants around.
    Carisoprodol (Soma is the brand name ) is commonly used. It can be a drug of abuse and is highly sought after by teenagers as a street drug. Soma's major metabolite is mebrobamate which was a major abuse problem in the the 1960s. It was eventually replaced by the benzos..Valium, Xanax and so forth as abused medications.
    Another cause of pain in the trapezius can be referred pain from a cervical disk. I had this problem several years ago. I never had neck pain only unbearable pain in the upper back. I thought I was the only one with the problem but not so. Couple weeks ago I ran into a guy at the gym who was exercising in obvious discomfort. He had pains in the shoulder and trapezius from a ruptured disk. He was exercising against the advice of his orthopedic surgeonicon_eek.gif
    Does naproxen (Alleve) cause heart disease? This is a highly debated topic. Vioxx a similar type drug was removed from the market for this problem. The risk for naproxen and ibuprofen (Motrin, Advil) is small
    http://www.webmd.com/heart-disease/news/20051128/ibuprofen-naproxen-no-heart-risk.
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    Jun 01, 2009 12:14 PM GMT
    barriehomeboy saidphysical therapy won't help this guy anymore than an personal trainer


    sorry but how do you know this? Medication can deal with the symptoms, but unless the underlying issue is sorted out, the problem will come back.
  • Timbales

    Posts: 13993

    Jun 01, 2009 12:22 PM GMT
    DCEric saidcan't contain self.... geek emergency override...
    itsatrap.jpg


    tarp.jpgE
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    Jun 01, 2009 8:04 PM GMT
    I guess I should have been more specific. I fell down at home and about a week later I started feeling the soreness. It has felt better over the last day. The doctor I saw put me on light duty for a week but I convinced my work to just give me the week off. He and I agreed that I probably would not have had any pain but since I am physically active at my job that was what triggered it.

    He did offer physical therapy but I told him I would take the light duty and rest with what he prescribed and if it didn't work then I would go that route. I will be returning to work on Wednesday simply because I can't afford to take any more time off. I told human resources that I wasn't 100% yet and was told that it will be okay to not allow anyone to put me under too much physical stress.

    Thanks for the advice.
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    Jun 02, 2009 2:46 AM GMT
    Yeah sounds like you should be doing Chiro then Massage dude. Something shifted and might be pulling on the muscle group... are you experiencing neck pain as well? If you fell on your arm your elbow could be out causing a domino effect into your shoulder and traps. Just remember, where you feel the pain isn't always the area that is effected.