Dick Cheney Supports Gay Marriage

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    Jun 01, 2009 10:45 PM GMT
    Cheney on gay marriage: 'Freedom for everyone'
    By PAMELA HESS – 2 hours ago

    WASHINGTON (AP) — Former Vice President Dick Cheney said Monday he supports gays being able to marry but believes states, not the federal government, should make the decision.

    "I think, you know, freedom means freedom for everyone," Cheney said in a speech at the National Press Club. "I think people ought to be free to enter into any kind of union they wish, any kind of arrangement they wish."

    Cheney, who has a gay daughter, said marriage has always been a state issue.

    "And I think that's the way it ought to be handled today, that is, on a state-by-state basis. Different states will make different decisions. But I don't have any problem with that. I think people ought to get a shot at that," he said.

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    Jun 01, 2009 11:18 PM GMT
    jimib said"I think people ought to get a shot at that," he said.


    That's funny coming from him. I don't really agree with it being a state decision though but I guess it is better then absolutely not.
  • calibro

    Posts: 8888

    Jun 01, 2009 11:26 PM GMT
    jimib said"I think people ought to get a shot at that," he said.



    hmm... perhaps he meant to say "I think people ought to get a shot at that," he said.
  • styrgan

    Posts: 2017

    Jun 01, 2009 11:26 PM GMT
    calibro said
    jimib said"I think people ought to get a shot at that," he said.



    hmm... perhaps he meant to say "I think people ought to get a shot at that," he said.


    hahaha.. clever...
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    Jun 01, 2009 11:58 PM GMT
    jimib said
    "I think, you know, freedom means freedom for everyone," Cheney said in a speech at the National Press Club. "I think people ought to be free to enter into any kind of union they wish, any kind of arrangement they wish."

    "And I think that's the way it ought to be handled today, that is, on a state-by-state basis. Different states will make different decisions. But I don't have any problem with that. I think people ought to get a shot at that," he said.



    ...freedom for everyone...unless the states say otherwise? failicon_exclaim.gif
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    Jun 02, 2009 1:11 AM GMT
    Please. It's just a PR stunt to lure young voters to the GOP.

    Megan McCain was on Colbert proclaiming her push for pro-sex education to teach students about safer sex.

    Plus, someone can say they're all about equality. Really, what has Cheney done for us, ever? Put you words to action, or STFU.
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    Jun 02, 2009 1:22 AM GMT
    GwgTrunks said Really, what has Cheney done for us, ever?


    Good point - well worth consideration. While I'm at it though, I'm considering the same question for Obama. So many of my friends are more than pissed about this clown and his empty promises. I'd rather deal with a politician who never promised us jack - and at least was honest about his disdain for us - - - - - than to have cast a vote for Obama - who made promises to buy our votes - and then fucked us over.
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    Jun 02, 2009 1:27 AM GMT
    its still early...keep the faith for a bit longer. I find it perplexing why folks expect instant gratification when the problems the US/World faces are so immense and complex?!
  • DCEric

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    Jun 02, 2009 2:09 AM GMT
    Excuse me while I put on my shock face.
  • styrgan

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    Jun 02, 2009 2:16 AM GMT
    I really hate to defend Dick Cheney, but I think some of you guys are being a little unfair...

    He has had a similar position for a pretty long time - ever since the Defense of Marriage amendment debate when he vocally disagreed with Bush on our behalf.. Isn't it much more likely that this is attributed to his daughter than it is to some dark, political objective?

    His position actually makes sense from a conservative point of view. It's all about the federal government not really getting involved - which a good compromise between the conservative disdain for "judicial activism" and the idea of states' rights. Considering that marriage law is primarily defined by the courts and the states, his position seems logical given his circumstances.

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    Jun 02, 2009 2:19 AM GMT
    Maybe we can get him to preside over a gay marriage. It would be great PR!
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    Jun 02, 2009 2:25 AM GMT

    jimib saidDick Cheney Supports Gay Marriage


    And I support Dick! * icon_biggrin.gif

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    Jun 02, 2009 2:26 AM GMT
    I don't trust him - either way he's a "dick!"
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    Jun 02, 2009 2:27 AM GMT
    Jockbod48 said
    GwgTrunks said Really, what has Cheney done for us, ever?


    Good point - well worth consideration. While I'm at it though, I'm considering the same question for Obama. So many of my friends are more than pissed about this clown and his empty promises. I'd rather deal with a politician who never promised us jack - and at least was honest about his disdain for us - - - - - than to have cast a vote for Obama - who made promises to buy our votes - and then fucked us over.


    Exactly what I was about to post... Where is the contempt for Obama who supports the same thing Cheney just said and has "done" just as much as Cheney has?
  • B71115

    Posts: 482

    Jun 02, 2009 2:34 AM GMT
    There is no contempt for the same reason there is no contempt from the black community. The gay vote has been "bought" by the Democrats. Not bought with deeds, but words. It will be generations before gays wake up.
  • styrgan

    Posts: 2017

    Jun 02, 2009 2:46 AM GMT
    B71115 saidThere is no contempt for the same reason there is no contempt from the black community. The gay vote has been "bought" by the Democrats. Not bought with deeds, but words. It will be generations before gays wake up.



    No. I suppose our support has nothing to do with the fact that the platforms of both parties are completely opposed to one another? Or that just three years ago, the Republicans tried to amend the U.S. Constitution to define marriage as being heterosexual? Or that the Republicans (now on both federal and state levels) vote consistently against hate crimes and other forms of discrimination protection?

    I don't argue that the Democrats are always on our side or that they are pro-active enough. But at least they're not ready to hang us from the gallows for votes from the bible-thumpers. Let us not descend into false claims of moral equivalence between the two parties.
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    Jun 02, 2009 2:49 AM GMT
    StoneColdChad84 said
    Jockbod48 said
    GwgTrunks said Really, what has Cheney done for us, ever?


    Good point - well worth consideration. While I'm at it though, I'm considering the same question for Obama. So many of my friends are more than pissed about this clown and his empty promises. I'd rather deal with a politician who never promised us jack - and at least was honest about his disdain for us - - - - - than to have cast a vote for Obama - who made promises to buy our votes - and then fucked us over.


    Exactly what I was about to post... Where is the contempt for Obama who supports the same thing Cheney just said and has "done" just as much as Cheney has?


    President Obama declared June GLBT Pride Month for the first time since Bill Clinton was in office. Where as Cheney did nothing to get Bush to do that and used the GLBT rights as a wedge issue constantly.

    THE WHITE HOUSE Office of the Press Secretary
    For Immediate Release
    June 1, 2009
    LESBIAN, GAY, BISEXUAL, AND TRANSGENDER PRIDE MONTH, 2009
    - - - - - - -
    BY THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA
    A PROCLAMATION
    Forty years ago, patrons and supporters of the Stonewall Inn in New York City resisted police harassment that had become all too common for members of the lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) community. Out of this resistance, the LGBT rights movement in America was born. During LGBT Pride Month, we commemorate the events of June 1969 and commit to achieving equal justice under law for LGBT Americans.
    LGBT Americans have made, and continue to make, great and lasting contributions that continue to strengthen the fabric of American society. There are many well-respected LGBT leaders in all professional fields, including the arts and business communities. LGBT Americans also mobilized the Nation to respond to the domestic HIV/AIDS epidemic and have played a vital role in broadening this country's response to the HIV pandemic.

    Due in no small part to the determination and dedication of the LGBT rights movement, more LGBT Americans are living their lives openly today than ever before. I am proud to be the first President to appoint openly LGBT candidates to Senate-confirmed positions in the first 100 days of an Administration. These individuals embody the best qualities we seek in public servants, and across my Administration — in both the White House and the Federal agencies — openly LGBT employees are doing their jobs with distinction and professionalism.

    The LGBT rights movement has achieved great progress, but there is more work to be done. LGBT youth should feel safe to learn without the fear of harassment, and LGBT families and seniors should be allowed to live their lives with dignity and respect.

    My Administration has partnered with the LGBT community to advance a wide range of initiatives. At the international level, I have joined efforts at the United Nations to decriminalize homosexuality around the world. Here at home, I continue to support measures to bring the full spectrum of equal rights to LGBT Americans. These measures include enhancing hate crimes laws, supporting civil unions and Federal rights for LGBT couples, outlawing discrimination in the workplace, ensuring adoption rights, and ending the existing "Don't Ask, Don't Tell" policy in a way that strengthens our Armed Forces and our national security. We must also commit ourselves to fighting the HIV/AIDS epidemic by both reducing the number of HIV infections and providing care and support services to people living with HIV/AIDS across the United States.

    These issues affect not only the LGBT community, but also our entire Nation. As long as the promise of equality for all remains unfulfilled, all Americans are affected. If we can work together to advance the principles upon which our Nation was founded, every American will benefit. During LGBT Pride Month, I call upon the LGBT community, the Congress, and the American people to work together to promote equal rights for all, regardless of sexual orientation or gender identity.

    NOW, THEREFORE, I, BARACK OBAMA, President of the United States of America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by the Constitution and laws of the United States, do hereby proclaim June 2009 as Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Pride Month. I call upon the people of the United States to turn back discrimination and prejudice everywhere it exists.

    IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this first day of June, in the year of our Lord two thousand nine, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and thirty-third.

    BARACK OBAMA
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    Jun 02, 2009 2:54 AM GMT
    After more research, I think I'd like to see dick campaign for gay marriage. He can start right here in Colorado. Maybe even Colorado Springs, home of Focus on the Family.
  • metta

    Posts: 39129

    Jun 02, 2009 2:57 AM GMT
    [quote]
    Former Vice President Dick Cheney said Monday he supports gays being able to marry but believes states, not the federal government, should make the decision.
    [/quote]

    That is a cop out! Most of the rights of marriage come from the Federal Government. It is not freedom without the Federal recognition.


    bush_cheney_naked.jpg






    [quote]

    In 1997, the General Accounting Office of the Federal Government compiled a list of 1,049 rights and benefits which were related to civil marriage. In 2004 they did an update and found there were 1138 rights. The list includes thirteen categories of rights and benefits, including:
    •Social Security and Related Programs, Housing, and Food Stamps
    •Veterans' Benefits
    •Taxation
    •Federal Civilian and Military Service Benefits
    •Employment Benefits and Related Laws
    •Immigration, Naturalization, and Aliens
    •Trade, Commerce, and Intellectual Property
    •Financial Disclosure and Conflict of Interest
    You can view the 1997 GAO report here, which lists the 1049 rights. (480k, PDF format)
    Click here to view the list of 1138 rights updated in 2004.

    [/quote]

    http://www.marriageequality.org/index.php?page=1-138-federal-rights
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    Jun 02, 2009 3:04 AM GMT
    it's so obvious when people lie about this topic. icon_rolleyes.gif

    what he should be saying is "man. what the fuck was i thinking? basic human rights anyone?"

    Bingo Trunks - That Colbert episode with Megan McCain was another perfect example of idiots lying. she stumbled when asked why she supported gay marriage. and then she gave a lame answer.
  • styrgan

    Posts: 2017

    Jun 02, 2009 3:49 AM GMT
    jprichva said
    styrgan said His position actually makes sense from a conservative point of view. It's all about the federal government not really getting involved - which a good compromise between the conservative disdain for "judicial activism" and the idea of states' rights.

    Of course, "states' rights" are simply code for "we demand you stop intereferin' while we lynch our black---oops, too late---er---gay folks."

    States' rights as a doctrine has never meant anything other than a sop to the same people who declared blacks 3/5 human. It was evolved for that purpose, it has been historically applied for that purpose, and it's time to put that whole fucking idea to rest already.

    When you think about it, why should any protections depend on your zip code?


    State's rights means far more than a 19th century compromise. Throughout much of the culture war, states have been able to work out their own solutions to benefit their residents - on a variety of controversial issues - from gun control to abortion to the death penalty.

    It is sensible that in the secular conservative viewpoint such a framework would be used for solving gay marriage.

    I am not arguing in favor of state's rights, but it is the solution our country has accepted, and it seems that given our broadness and our diversity as a nation, letting the states solve such socially noisy problems is not the worst
    solution.
  • styrgan

    Posts: 2017

    Jun 02, 2009 11:16 PM GMT
    jprichva said
    styrgan said State's rights means far more than a 19th century compromise.

    From Bob Herbert's column in today's New York Times:

    Where were the howls of outrage at this strategy that was articulated by Lee Atwater as follows: “By 1968, you can’t say ‘nigger’ — that hurts you. Backfires. So you say stuff like forced busing, states’ rights, and all that stuff.”

    This man was the architect of Republican strategy until his premature death from a brain tumor. On his deathbed, he famously recanted his behavior and asked for forgiveness. If I'd have been there, I would have kicked his teeth down his throat in response.


    And I assume that Thomas Jefferson and James Madison were also being inherently racist somehow when early in our country's history they opposed the Alien and Sedition Act on the base of state's rights?

    Quoting one racist does not exterminate an entire principle from American history. Our country has long been a hotbed of the principle of self-governance by the states since the Stamp Act. As opposed as you are to the principle, you cannot simply excuse its legitimacy on the claim of prejudice.