ANTIBACTERIAL SPRAYS IN THE GYM

  • HndsmKansan

    Posts: 16311

    Nov 14, 2007 2:08 AM GMT
    Most gyms today have antibacterial sprays in bottles
    (with cloths) and encourage you to spray down the equipment to help with cleanliness. I use them frequently, but many people don't. The YMCA'S here in Wichita also have antibacterial lotion in canisters
    throughout the gym. I use it always before I leave.

    With the Staph infections around and the usual germie
    time of year approaching, how concerned are you with
    cleanliness of your gym. Are those sprays & lotions really helpful? Whats the condition of your locker room?
  • GQjock

    Posts: 11649

    Nov 14, 2007 4:11 AM GMT
    Use them guys...
    a friend of mine a few months ago got a staph infection that was resistant to antibiotics
    an MRSA infection (Methicillin resistant infection)
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    Nov 14, 2007 5:16 AM GMT
    Check this out for guidelines you can present to the gym management: Guidelines for Reducing the Spread of Staph/CAMRSA in Non-Healthcare Settings http://www.lapublichealth.org/acd/docs/MRSA/MRSA%20Guidelines.2007.pdf

    It comes down to personal hygiene [handwashing] and disinfection of shared surfaces like benches and equipment [not with antibacterial stuff but disinfectants -- bacteria don't develop resistance to disinfectants like they can to antibacterial products].
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    Nov 14, 2007 7:35 AM GMT
    Spray it down!!

    I only touch things in the locker room with a towel on my hand.
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    Nov 14, 2007 9:42 AM GMT
    I always wipe it down. Hundreds of people use the same equipment everyday at my gym. MRSA is bad, bad shit. Don't catch it! A friend of mine has been battling it for two years now. People living with HIV should be especially careful to wipe everthing down. They are more susceptible. One only needs a scratch to catch MRSA.
  • RSportsguy

    Posts: 1925

    Nov 14, 2007 10:01 AM GMT
    I know that they are starting to use antibacterial wipes in schools, especially weight rooms. I would highly recommend using the lotion at the gym. I usually bring my own towel and set it on the benches too.
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    Nov 15, 2007 5:30 PM GMT
    I spray down before and after use. even do a quick spray of the barbells and dumbbells

    i had the MRSA bug last year, it was a real pain to get rid of it. turned out i was allergic to 2 of the antibiotics used to fight it
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    Nov 18, 2007 6:36 PM GMT
    I always use the spray on my gym equipment; and I don't think I've ever seen anyone not use it, that I know of. The locker room is not as adequately equipped though. We could really use things as simple as sanitizing wipes in there somewhere. I always sit my barenaked ass down on the bench on a towel first whenever I get changed.
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    Nov 18, 2007 7:02 PM GMT
    my gym provides the spray bottles and paper towel dispensers, but they need a few more. i use them, but notice that others don't. i think more people would use them if they didn't have to walk half way across the gym to get them, often finding either the towel dispenser or spray bottle empty. (i know people shouldn't have a problem walking half way across the gym -- i certainly don't -- but people are often lazy.)
  • metta

    Posts: 39133

    Nov 18, 2007 7:23 PM GMT
    I wipe it down but I don't use antibacterial sprays because they kill the good bacteria as well.

    My best friend died partially from a staph infection 2 years ago. He had to take medicine to keep his immune system down so that his transplanted kidney would not be rejected. I hope that they will work faster to grow people kidneys so that people with transplants will not need to take all of that medicine.

    The staph bacteria is everywhere, including on your skin. Yes, there are some strains that are way more dangerous than others. The staph needs a way to enter your blood stream and needs to be able to beat your immune system in order for it to harm you.

    Make sure that you clean your wounds properly if you injur yourself and don't let an infection in your teeth go by unchecked.
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    Dec 30, 2013 6:52 PM GMT
    I just wipe with tissue. Or a cloth. Sometimes antibacterial spray, but always with some free tissue.
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    Dec 30, 2013 7:33 PM GMT
    The YMCA in downtown Rochester NY had a spray bottle on every machine. It was quite nice. Most of my sinus infections the past few years came from the gym.

    But, closer to LA-LA land with plummeting IQs, last night, a nearby stairmaster user struggled to clear her lungs..for a fuckin' hour.

    Gentlemen, I have discovered something worse than listening to them talk to each other.

    (having good luck with Emergen-C daily, so far.)
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    Jan 08, 2014 10:08 PM GMT
    I don't count on the person before me to wipe things down and neither should anybody else.

    But because I keep my hands away from my face I pretty much only wipe down in advance the lying leg curl machine (the face rests on the pad), my stretch mat area and whatever cardio equipment I use. I'll Purell my hands if I think I've come in contact with anything egregious.

    Maybe I'm living in a fool's paradise.
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    Jan 08, 2014 11:24 PM GMT
    i have started to wipe them before as well as after. I see tons of people just walk away from the machines. I feel like handing them the bottle and the cloth.
  • BillandChuck

    Posts: 2024

    Jan 08, 2014 11:37 PM GMT
    Have to agree that most of the time the incidents of bad gym citizenship with respect to wiping machines after use in particular are many on any given day. Antibacterial sprays, gels, etc., are a must in our opinion at the gym. And definitely shower sandals and our own soap in the showers, with extra towels used on the floor after the shower so our feet never have to actually touch the filthy locker room floor.
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    Jan 08, 2014 11:53 PM GMT
    HndsmKansan saidMost gyms today have antibacterial sprays in bottles
    (with cloths) and encourage you to spray down the equipment to help with cleanliness. I use them frequently, but many people don't. The YMCA'S here in Wichita also have antibacterial lotion in canisters
    throughout the gym. I use it always before I leave.

    With the Staph infections around and the usual germie
    time of year approaching, how concerned are you with
    cleanliness of your gym. Are those sprays & lotions really helpful? Whats the condition of your locker room?


    Anti bacterials are generally a bad idea in that they promote super bacteria adaptation.

    Their use is actively being discouraged by CDC and the FDA.

    That being said, if you sweat like a pig, wipe it off.
  • FRE0

    Posts: 4865

    Jan 09, 2014 12:33 AM GMT
    The gym where I work out, Defined Fitness, has sprays and paper towels available, but they are used by only 5% of those who work out there. Periodically gym personnel wipe down equipment with disinfectants but I don't know how often. I wash my hands with the provided liquid soap before and after working out. There are gymnasia here at which people do wipe down equipment after using it, but not Defined Fitness.
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    Jan 09, 2014 2:22 AM GMT
    The more people that do it the better, however its pretty rare for me to see someone do it..
  • FRE0

    Posts: 4865

    Jan 09, 2014 7:34 AM GMT
    b99997 saidDisinfectants are useful. The issue many people forget about is the amount of Contact Time (the amount of time the surface must remain visibly wet with the disinfectant)required to disinfect the surface. Depending on the product, it could take anywhere between 30 seconds to 10 minutes to destroy the pathogens. My guess is that most gyms are using "quats" as they are most common and are broad spectrum. Many times wipes don't provide adequate contact time. Read the label on the canister if these are used.
    Hydrogen Peroxide based products tend to be effective and are becoming more frequently used as they are less toxic and require less dwell time. The con is they can damage some surfaces.

    When in doubt, you could always ask your gym about their disinfection procedures, or you could just spray, wait a minute dry it off and use a towel.......




    -I am not a professional, just know a bit about microbiology.


    When a gym is busy, it is unlikely that surfaces will remain wet for more than a very few seconds after being sprayed with a disinfectant. The usual procedure is to spray the equipment and immediately wipe it off, or wipe it with a towel that has been sprayed once with a disinfectant and, without being sprayed again, used to wipe down several different pieces of equipment. Those are the only procedures I have ever seen.

    Things have improved though. In about 1961, which when I first started working out in a gym, many guys (there were no women) didn't wear shirts and often left benches wet with their sweat. It was gross!
  • FRE0

    Posts: 4865

    Jan 09, 2014 7:35 AM GMT
    Adam228 saidThe more people that do it the better, however its pretty rare for me to see someone do it..


    That sounds like the Defined Fitness here in Albuquerque where I work out.
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    Jan 09, 2014 7:50 AM GMT
    I wipe down my equipment before and after I use it. Including the free weights.
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    Jan 09, 2014 7:58 AM GMT
    GAMRican saidI wipe down my equipment before and after I use it. Including the free weights.
    I only do mine after. There's a reason I hardly ever get sick.
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    Jan 09, 2014 3:57 PM GMT
    b99997 saidDisinfectants are useful. The issue many people forget about is the amount of Contact Time (the amount of time the surface must remain visibly wet with the disinfectant)required to disinfect the surface. Depending on the product, it could take anywhere between 30 seconds to 10 minutes to destroy the pathogens. My guess is that most gyms are using "quats" as they are most common and are broad spectrum. Many times wipes don't provide adequate contact time. Read the label on the canister if these are used.
    Hydrogen Peroxide based products tend to be effective and are becoming more frequently used as they are less toxic and require less dwell time. The con is they can damage some surfaces.

    When in doubt, you could always ask your gym about their disinfection procedures, or you could just spray, wait a minute dry it off and use a towel.......




    -I am not a professional, just know a bit about microbiology.


    Peroxide is a no go. Staph breaks it down to harmless oxygen and water. Isopropyl alcohol works well.
  • FRE0

    Posts: 4865

    Jan 09, 2014 11:04 PM GMT
    My sister says she does not wipe down equipment before using it. She says that exposure to germs makes her stronger. I've heard others say the same thing.
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    Jan 09, 2014 11:18 PM GMT
    FRE0 saidMy sister says she does not wipe down equipment before using it. She says that exposure to germs makes her stronger. I've heard others say the same thing.


    This is one of those situations for which the old adage, "a little knowledge is a dangerous thing" applies. I hear people say this ALL the time, and no matter what I say, I cannot convince them that they are wrong.

    I ask them, "so, does that mean I can inject you with HIV or Ebola, and you'll just fight it off and be stronger afterwards?" They usually retort that those are exceptions--that, for the most part, when you get a cold or the flu, it builds up your immunity to other infections. I tell them that this is true only to the extent that subsequent infections are sufficiently similar to previous infections, and that one's immune system was able to successfully produce and keep memory T and B cells that remember the previous antigen.

    At that point their eyes glaze over and they just shrug off what I've said because it's too "scientific" and "nerdy" for their brains to handle.