Contemporary Art Fans?

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    Jun 08, 2009 1:57 AM GMT
    Just looking for guys on here that are into fine arts-especially Modern and Contemporary-for conversation, discussion, etc. Love to talk art, art theory, etc. I know it might be a small niche, but if you feelin me-let me know!

    Here are some of my favorite artists:

    Antony Gormley
    Ursula von Rydingsvard
    Matthew Ritchie
    George Condo
    Alex Grey
    Jean Michel-Basquiat
    Richard Tuttle
    Anish Kapoor
    Ellen Gallagher
    Jessica Stockholder
    Marcel Duchamp
    Gerhard Richter
    Barbara Krueger

    The list goes on...chat me up! icon_idea.gif
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    Jun 08, 2009 2:03 AM GMT
    yoga_matt saidJust looking for guys on here that are into fine arts-especially Modern and Contemporary-for conversation, discussion, etc. Love to talk art, art theory, etc. I know it might be a small niche, but if you feelin me-let me know!

    Ursula von Rydingsvard ... does her work look like dinosaur coprolites to anybody else?
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    Jun 08, 2009 2:23 AM GMT
    I make a joke about Banksy and Damian Hurst joke the other day at a party and no one got it... which is a shame, because it was really clever.

    Just thought I would share my frustration.
  • calibro

    Posts: 8888

    Jun 08, 2009 2:49 AM GMT
    I adore Lucian Freud's new piece Sunny Morning-- Eight Legs

    l_da8c6c1c673b4f4e8428a5535aca8eaf.jpg
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    Jun 08, 2009 2:52 AM GMT
    I love Lucian Freud. His work reminds me so much of my favorite bits of late Edward Hopper.
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    Jun 08, 2009 3:05 AM GMT
    calibro saidI adore Lucian Freud's new piece Sunny Morning-- Eight Legs

    l_da8c6c1c673b4f4e8428a5535aca8eaf.jpg

    That's kinda repulsive to me. What is one supposed to see with that picture?
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    Jun 08, 2009 3:09 AM GMT
    It certainly makes you wonder who and why about the person under the mattress.

    I've appreciated some of Freud's other work. Hurst as well. Banksy is as much about his mystique as his work. I've got a soft spot for Keith Haring as well as Basquiat.
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    Jun 08, 2009 3:11 AM GMT
    TheGuyNextDoor said
    Caslon11000 said
    calibro saidI adore Lucian Freud's new piece Sunny Morning-- Eight Legs

    l_da8c6c1c673b4f4e8428a5535aca8eaf.jpg

    That's kinda repulsive to me. What is one supposed to see with that picture?

    BEAUTY,,,,, and lots of it...icon_eek.gif

    Explain that beauty to me, please. Maybe the reason the painter painted the painting.
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    Jun 08, 2009 3:14 AM GMT
    calibro saidI adore Lucian Freud's new piece Sunny Morning-- Eight Legs

    l_da8c6c1c673b4f4e8428a5535aca8eaf.jpg


    OMG!!! That painting is like an actual scene from my life! Sleeping with a naked guy who had a Whippet dog, very much like the one here. The dog didn't want me sharing "their" bed and managed to push me off. I ended up sleeping on the floor next to the bed, wrapped in just the covers I could pull down on me.

    This is so real, almost a photograph of that night, like the artist had been there. How spooky!
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    Jun 08, 2009 3:16 AM GMT
    Red_Vespa said
    calibro saidI adore Lucian Freud's new piece Sunny Morning-- Eight Legs

    l_da8c6c1c673b4f4e8428a5535aca8eaf.jpg


    OMG!!! That painting is like an actual scene from my life! Sleeping with a naked guy who had a Whippet dog, very much like the one here. The dog didn't want me sharing "their" bed and managed to push me off. I ended up sleeping on the floor next to the bed, wrapped in just the covers I could pull down on me.

    This is so real, almost a photograph of that night, like the artist had been there. How spooky!

    icon_rolleyes.gif
  • jgymnast733

    Posts: 1783

    Jun 08, 2009 3:19 AM GMT
    I'v had the pleasure of meeting Basquiat at a club called the Paradise Garage [ of course years ago], and i'v had the pleasure of having a conversation with Keith Herring at Radio City Music Hall, he was alone so i approched him and we had a great talk.. He was there to see the X-mas show....He also invited me to the paladium for his party...
  • captaindave4

    Posts: 66

    Jun 08, 2009 3:23 AM GMT
    This is a great topic.

    When I lived in Cleveland, I used to go see this one occasionally:

    KIEFER_1.jpg

    It's "Lot's Wife" by Anselm Kiefer. It's a large painting (11x14 feet) and he used lots of different materials for it (even ash, salt, and a copper coil). It was amazing to see in person.

    Recently I got to see a whole gallery dedicated to Francis Bacon's work at the Metropolitan Museum of Art. There were about five rooms full of his work (ordered chronologically). All of his most important work was there, including this one, which, for me, is his most recognizable:

    study_after_velazquezs_portrait_of_pope_
    "Study after Velazquez's Portrait of Pope Innocent X"

    Also, there is an unlikely installation of lawn chairs in the middle of Times Square. It's called "What the Hell Are Those Lawn Chairs Doing in the Middle of Times Square" and an artist named Mike Bloomberg is the rascal behind it. Pretty funny, I think.

    http://alexrossmusic.typepad.com/.a/6a00d83451cb2869e2011570af8280970b-pi

  • calibro

    Posts: 8888

    Jun 08, 2009 3:31 AM GMT
    Caslon11000 said
    calibro saidI adore Lucian Freud's new piece Sunny Morning-- Eight Legs

    l_da8c6c1c673b4f4e8428a5535aca8eaf.jpg

    That's kinda repulsive to me. What is one supposed to see with that picture?


    This is the placard from the Arts Institute of Chicago where I saw the painting.

    l_b95cab01cfbf4f1694eeebbf32df0898.jpg

    Personally, I adore the vulnerability of the photo. You have an emaciated figure disturbingly clutching an emaciated dog, and a mysterious pair of legs underneath that hints at violence, murder, etc.... Yet, the nudeness and the starvation with the bleak colors offer meaning almost in the same manner as the brush strokes, which aren't perfect in rendering an image, but filled in enough for your eyes to make shapes, as the way your mind is trying to fill the gaps of the story in the painting. There's something very effecting about seeing a person caught in a heinous act, yet exposed as a person by being presented sleeping, so as to be unaware of the viewer gazing down at him, nude and holding a dog, something common and penetrating. You want to despise much in the painting, and part of it grabs at your emotions and empathy. It's wonderfully complex, emotive, and stunning. Even the side aesthetics, like the way he paints and drapes fabric, are remarkable. Keep in mind, it's also like 10 feet high.I also love the way the painting references Michelangelo's Conversion of Saint Paul

    michelangelo_st_paul.jpg
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    Jun 08, 2009 3:48 AM GMT
    TheGuyNextDoor saidCaslon, the best part about ART is in the interpretation. I can see that, that piece will not move everyone and greatly move others like me and the story that came to mind with Red Vespa.
    Just like in my profile, there are a lot of landscape photos I shot that move me while for some others it's just photos of the outdoors.
    When I look at that painting, I see peace, beauty, eroticism, surprise, wonder, interesting lighting, great thought in the colors used and so on.
    Overall in one word,, I see Beauty.

    If the artist intent was to evoke repulsion, he accomplished it in me.
  • calibro

    Posts: 8888

    Jun 08, 2009 3:53 AM GMT
    Caslon11000 said

    If the artist intent was to evoke repulsion, he accomplished it in me.


    Didn't you read my reply to you of why he is evoking repulsion for a duality affect on the human psyche?
  • captaindave4

    Posts: 66

    Jun 08, 2009 3:54 AM GMT
    Well, Caslon, it's better that it evokes repulsion than for it to evoke apathy.
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    Jun 08, 2009 3:55 AM GMT
    calibro said
    Caslon11000 said

    If the artist intent was to evoke repulsion, he accomplished it in me.


    Didn't you read my reply to you of why he is evoking repulsion for a duality affect on the human psyche?

    Ah ha! I knew I was a natural art critic. ... icon_biggrin.gif
  • captaindave4

    Posts: 66

    Jun 08, 2009 4:11 AM GMT
    I don't find it repulsive. I was commenting on Caslon's reaction, which is as valid as any other, although I don't empathize.
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    Jun 08, 2009 4:18 AM GMT
    TheGuyNextDoor saidHow interesting.. Repulsed huh? Hummm, is it the dog on the bed sheets, the nudity, the shape of the man on the bed,, the oddness of the legs from under the bed. Tell me more David. I'm curious now.

    Well, the whole scene is off putting
    the subject is gross
    the colors are sick
    the room is stark
    the bed is pathetic
    the perspective is off
    the man on the bed is disgusting looking
    the legs under the bed are unsettling
  • calibro

    Posts: 8888

    Jun 08, 2009 4:24 AM GMT
    Caslon11000 said
    TheGuyNextDoor saidHow interesting.. Repulsed huh? Hummm, is it the dog on the bed sheets, the nudity, the shape of the man on the bed,, the oddness of the legs from under the bed. Tell me more David. I'm curious now.

    Well, the whole scene is off putting
    the subject is gross
    the colors are sick
    the room is stark
    the bed is pathetic
    the perspective is off
    the man on the bed is disgusting looking
    the legs under the bed are unsettling


    ::response bump::

    "Personally, I adore the vulnerability of the photo. You have an emaciated figure disturbingly clutching an emaciated dog, and a mysterious pair of legs underneath that hints at violence, murder, etc.... Yet, the nudeness and the starvation with the bleak colors offer meaning almost in the same manner as the brush strokes, which aren't perfect in rendering an image, but filled in enough for your eyes to make shapes, as the way your mind is trying to fill the gaps of the story in the painting. There's something very effecting about seeing a person caught in a heinous act, yet exposed as a person by being presented sleeping, so as to be unaware of the viewer gazing down at him, nude and holding a dog, something common and penetrating. You want to despise much in the painting, and part of it grabs at your emotions and empathy. It's wonderfully complex, emotive, and stunning. Even the side aesthetics, like the way he paints and drapes fabric, are remarkable. Keep in mind, it's also like 10 feet high.I also love the way the painting references Michelangelo's Conversion of Saint Paul"
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    Jun 08, 2009 4:33 AM GMT
    The dog's name is Pluto. ... icon_rolleyes.gif
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    Jun 08, 2009 4:38 AM GMT
    calibro saidI also love the way the painting references Michelangelo's Conversion of Saint Paul"

    Several of his pieces seem to be compared to classical artworks...
    http://www.2blowhards.com/archives/000669.html


    oh btw, this thread shows up on google already when looking for Sunny morning eight legs .... icon_rolleyes.gif
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    Jun 08, 2009 4:54 AM GMT
    Caslon11000 said
    TheGuyNextDoor saidHow interesting.. Repulsed huh? Hummm, is it the dog on the bed sheets, the nudity, the shape of the man on the bed,, the oddness of the legs from under the bed. Tell me more David. I'm curious now.

    Well, the whole scene is off putting
    the subject is gross
    the colors are sick
    the room is stark
    the bed is pathetic
    the perspective is off
    the man on the bed is disgusting looking
    the legs under the bed are unsettling



    Where were you when we were in Art History classes? Jeez, you'da gotten full marks icon_razz.gif

    Lucien freud i.e. grandson of mr Sigmund - of course his works are weird. I'm not that big a fan of his - although i believe he still holds the record for the painting that sold for the most money to a living artist? sold for over 30 million iirc... i forget which painting but if you want to be icon_eek.gif and even more repulsed - go look it up, it's a catch icon_razz.gif
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    Jun 08, 2009 4:58 AM GMT
    Caslon11000 said
    yoga_matt saidJust looking for guys on here that are into fine arts-especially Modern and Contemporary-for conversation, discussion, etc. Love to talk art, art theory, etc. I know it might be a small niche, but if you feelin me-let me know!

    Ursula von Rydingsvard ... does her work look like dinosaur coprolites to anybody else?


    Maybe just a little icon_razz.gif
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    Jun 08, 2009 5:06 AM GMT
    MunchingZombie saidI make a joke about Banksy and Damian Hurst joke the other day at a party and no one got it... which is a shame, because it was really clever.

    Just thought I would share my frustration.


    What was the joke?