English getting its millionth word Wednesday

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jun 09, 2009 10:57 PM GMT
    Story Highlights

    Web site estimates English will get its millionth word at 5:22 a.m. Wednesday

    English accumulates new words from other languages and from its global reach

    Linguists question group's formula, which estimates rate of new words

    English has more words than any other language, group says


    "English contains more words than any other other language on the planet and will add its millionth word early Wednesday, according to the Global Language Monitor, a Web site that uses a math formula to estimate how often words are created.

    The Global Language Monitor says the millionth word will be added to English on Wednesday.

    The site estimates the millionth word will be added Wednesday at 5:22 a.m. Its live ticker counted 999,985 English words as of early Tuesday evening." ...

    "Paul J.J. Payack, president and chief word analyst for the Global Language Monitor, says, however, that the million-word estimation isn't as important as the idea behind his project, which is to show that English has become a complex, global language.

    "It's a people's language," he said.

    Other languages, like French, Payack said, put big walls around their vocabularies. English brings others in."

    "English has the tradition of swallowing new words whole," he said. "Other languages translate."



    http://www.cnn.com/2009/TECH/06/09/million.words/index.html

  • coolarmydude

    Posts: 9190

    Jun 10, 2009 12:48 AM GMT
    I thought 'snooze' was already a word.

    I predict 'snarf'. Ask Bjork about it.
  • coolarmydude

    Posts: 9190

    Jun 10, 2009 12:50 AM GMT
    Wait, wait, wait, wait...wait a minute....

    Caslon, do you mean to tell us that something has a higher count than your thread post count?

    The new word will be Caslonian. icon_wink.gif
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    Jun 10, 2009 12:51 AM GMT
    coolarmydude saidWait, wait, wait, wait...wait a minute....

    Caslon, do you mean to tell us that something has a higher count than your thread post count?

    The new word will be Caslonian. icon_wink.gif

    not "caslonificent"? ... icon_biggrin.gif
  • DCEric

    Posts: 3713

    Jun 10, 2009 2:41 AM GMT
    Caslonian - One who achieves a ridiculously high post count, one who instinctively posts LOLCats and other animal pictures with text

    Where do I collect my winnings?
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jun 10, 2009 2:46 AM GMT
    DCEric saidCaslonian - One who achieves a ridiculously high post count, one who instinctively posts LOLCats and other animal pictures with text

    Where do I collect my winnings?

    funny pictures
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jun 10, 2009 3:16 AM GMT
    million?

    I barely understand about 30 of them
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jun 11, 2009 2:53 AM GMT
    "Web2.0" becomes the millionth word in the English language. Hmm...
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jun 11, 2009 12:21 PM GMT
    Seriously, I've long believed English to be the world's ideal language, for the reasons the OP quotes from the article. There used to be an old phrase "The French have a word for it" but if they once did, English borrowed it long along. Here's an article about examples of how English seems capable of absorbing words and phrases from any language:

    http://entertainment.timesonline.co.uk/tol/arts_and_entertainment/books/article2355779.ece

    German was once the language of science & math, and when I went to prep school in 1963, students who selected the "Science Tract" of studies had to learn German beginning as Freshman, used for text books & lectures. Today English is the language of science, and personally, being able to read German & French, among other languages, I can see how the huge, subtle & precise English vocabulary is far better suited for that purpose.

    You can see it for yourself in what might at first seem a frivolous way, but whose significance is much more profound. Look at one of the multi-language instruction sheets that come with many things we buy today. The length of the English text is invariably shorter than the other languages.

    English can express what it needs in far few words, because it has a larger vocabulary, with a single, specific word for most concepts & objects. Other languages use often unclear idiomatic phrases and lengthy constructions to express what English can more accurately do in a single discreet word, especially when dealing with new ideas & things not previously contained in their native vocabulary.