to the brothas...do you take offense to the gay community for leveraging its plight by proclaiming "gay is the new black?"

  • kaccioto

    Posts: 284

    Jun 11, 2009 4:37 PM GMT
    ...when aversion to black men, specifically within our own gay community, still exists, albeit handled with more subtlety to keep one's innocence.

    my colleague (who acknowledges the quota for his kind has been met in our front office) explains to me..

    'as a gay man you have the luxury of weighing pros and cons to see if it makes sense to come out at a point in your lifetime, should you choose..as a black man, the second you are born, the wind is blowing against you..apples and oranges'

    gay-is-the-new-black-advocate.jpg

  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Jun 11, 2009 4:58 PM GMT
    'mah asians, do you take offense when the fashion industries says Yellow is the new black...'

    This thread is ridiculous.
  • kaccioto

    Posts: 284

    Jun 11, 2009 5:12 PM GMT
    SantosMadrid said'mah asians, do you take offense when the fashion industries says Yellow is the new black...'


    is this a serious statement? everyone knows magenta just replaced lavender as the new black..you're so 2000 and late.

    ahh texas, nm
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Jun 11, 2009 5:20 PM GMT
    kaccioto said
    SantosMadrid said'mah asians, do you take offense when the fashion industries says Yellow is the new black...'


    is this a serious statement? everyone knows magenta just replaced lavender as the new black..you're so 2000 and late.

    ahh texas, nm



    It is not a serious statement. it was an example to show that your making a big deal outta nothin'. So far, none brothaz have replied. They probably looked at the title and was like 'oh pleez - another overly-offended nigga' tryin' to stir shit up'. Trust me I know - if there is any race I identify with the most - its MY brothaz.
  • Timbales

    Posts: 13993

    Jun 11, 2009 5:26 PM GMT
    Are you saying black men are turned away from community centers, serving on committees, charities and other gay organizations?
  • kaccioto

    Posts: 284

    Jun 11, 2009 5:53 PM GMT
    SantosMadrid said'oh pleez - another overly-offended nigga' tryin' to stir shit up'.


    uhh the quote was his yo..i looked at him and said quit being emo, get me a coffee. damn first years.

    i was gonna engage him to tell me about his experiences as a black dude who got it from both sides; his own community deriding him for wanting to leave government housing (uncle tom), and his ivy peers who left him feeling alienated.

    then i heartily reminded myself that only one color really matters - green son, let it raaaiiinnn

  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Jun 11, 2009 5:53 PM GMT
    Timberoo saidAre you saying black men are turned away from community centers, serving on committees, charities and other gay organizations?


    if this question is for me - answer: not at all.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Jun 11, 2009 6:00 PM GMT
    kaccioto said
    SantosMadrid said'oh pleez - another overly-offended nigga' tryin' to stir shit up'.

    uhh the quote was his yo..i looked at him and said quit being emo, get me a coffee. damn first years.
    i was gonna engage him to tell me about his experiences as a black dude who got it from both sides; his own community deriding him for wanting to leave government housing (uncle tom), and his ivy peers who left him feeling alienated.
    then i heartily reminded myself that only one color really matters - green son,


    I see. I am all for challenging the 'social norm' the gay community has preferred to favor, due to capitalist media driven anglo supported conditioning through trends - fashion and art (of which things most if not many gay men gravitate toward). Why not challenge it at is core? Roots still grow.
  • jarhead5536

    Posts: 1348

    Jun 11, 2009 7:26 PM GMT
    I don't particularly take offense to the saying. Perhaps The Advocate knew what they were doing by intentionally taking an innocuous phrase related to fashion and tying it to civil rights, because I some people didn't like the reference...
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Jun 11, 2009 7:41 PM GMT
    I like this thread.

    In my experience, some in the black community do not like it when the struggle for gay rights is compared to the struggle blacks have endured, and continue to endure.

    With that, the Advocate cover can be offensive.

    One major flaw with the campaign to defeat Prop. 8 was the lack of outreach to communities of color (straight or gay.)

    So we should be more careful about being witty with our magazine covers, at least until marriage equality is achieved, at least until people of color that identify as gay or lesbian don't feel like they've been included only when their support is needed at the ballot box, etc.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Jun 11, 2009 7:41 PM GMT
    It depends on the day. I do feel like the black and white gay community is divided. The opportunities are there, but neither one wants to take the first step. I remember the big discussion about why not have an inclusive pride instead of a black pride and white pride.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Jun 11, 2009 7:43 PM GMT
    The advocate was not the first to use that phrase and I think the controversy around it is pretty strange.

    It just tries to connect "our" civil rights struggle to "their" civil rights struggle, which is often called "the" civil rights struggle.

    In my town, many of the black ministers denounced the use of the term "civil rights" because they had to fight for the vote, citizenship, and (believe it or not) the right to marry who they chose. One black minister spoke at our pride parade saying that those of his community who do not see that GLBT rights are civil rights never understood the definition of civil rights. And I agree.

    But man, identity politics sure fucks up a simple issue.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Jun 11, 2009 7:52 PM GMT
    The plight of Gay Marriage should not be compared to the plight Blacks have have historically. However, it is a part of the Civil Rights movement and that also encompasses what Women had to go through as well and still do til this day. And being of Mexican descent and raised by my Step-Dad who is Black, it doesn't make a difference to me, however the shock value is there.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Jun 11, 2009 8:31 PM GMT
    Timberoo saidAre you saying black men are turned away from community centers, serving on committees, charities and other gay organizations?


    It's exactly that, but even more serious than that actually - how about having a rope tied around your head and dragged behind a pickup truck until it comes off?

    There's a long list, but I don't feel like giving it.

  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Jun 11, 2009 8:37 PM GMT
    Holy kaccioto spliting hairs much... icon_rolleyes.gif
  • MercuryMax

    Posts: 713

    Jun 11, 2009 8:41 PM GMT
    Blackguy4you said
    Timberoo saidAre you saying black men are turned away from community centers, serving on committees, charities and other gay organizations?


    It's exactly that, but even more serious than that actually - how about having a rope tied around your head and dragged behind a pickup truck until it comes off?

    There's a long list, but I don't feel like giving it.



    I'm pretty sure that's been equated with being tied to a barbed wire fence and being beat to death with various objects because he was gay.


    As for gay rights versus black rights. It shouldn't matter which has been more of a struggle or longer going or more violent than the other.

    THE FACT IS...blacks deserve their rights, gays deserve their rights and they have been and will be a struggle. There shouldn't be a competition between which rights are more imperative. Why? Because they are equally imperative and equally deserved for the reason that they are RIGHTS, not privileges.

    Privileges have to be earned. RIGHTS should not be.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Jun 11, 2009 8:42 PM GMT


    I don't take offense. I agree. More so, that blacks, particularly the so called "black church" needs to address the hatred and ignorance within their own damn community.

    As someone stated earlier, this is a civil rights issue and although it might be apples and oranges..they are both still FRUIT dammit.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Jun 11, 2009 8:43 PM GMT
    MercuryMax said
    Blackguy4you said
    Timberoo saidAre you saying black men are turned away from community centers, serving on committees, charities and other gay organizations?

    It's exactly that, but even more serious than that actually - how about having a rope tied around your head and dragged behind a pickup truck until it comes off?
    There's a long list, but I don't feel like giving it.


    I'm pretty sure that's been equated with being tied to a barbed wire fence and being beat to death with various objects because he was gay.
    As for gay rights versus black rights. It shouldn't matter which has been more of a struggle or longer going or more violent than the other.
    THE FACT IS...blacks deserve their rights, gays deserve their rights and they have been and will be a struggle. There shouldn't be a competition between which rights are more imperative. Why? Because they are equally imperative and equally deserved for the reason that they are RIGHTS, not privileges.
    Privileges have to be earned. Rights should not be.



    Bravo. kudos. well said.
  • MercuryMax

    Posts: 713

    Jun 11, 2009 8:43 PM GMT
    imlistedhere said

    I don't take offense. I agree. More so, that blacks, particularly the so called "black church" needs to address the hatred and ignorance within their own damn community.

    As someone stated earlier, this is a civil rights issue and although it might be apples and oranges..they are both still FRUIT dammit.


    Very well put, Sir.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Jun 11, 2009 8:44 PM GMT
    ^^^^^^^^^^^

    lmao @ the aphro romance ad. ..is there some kind of word association that alerts RJ???


  • SanDiegoSon

    Posts: 12

    Jun 11, 2009 8:46 PM GMT
    'as a gay man you have the luxury of weighing pros and cons to see if it makes sense to come out at a point in your lifetime, should you choose..as a black man, the second you are born, the wind is blowing against you..apples and oranges'


    As a black man who is gay i must agree with the statement above regarding ---luxury (or privilege) and choice or option to disclose your sexual orientation. While the "stigma" of being black and the "stigma" of being gay are similar, they are NOT the same.

    In my experience, the visibility factor v. choice of disclosure, is what many non-blacks don't get and what infuriates black folks the most about the comparison.

    Privilege (white skin privilege) is a powerful thing as it imbues (white) people with the ability to NOT have to care about/notice/question/challenge/or explain certain things if they don't choose to.

    Some people are conscious as they exercise this privilege, others are not. But if those of us who are black and/or gay don't quit competing in the Oppression Olympics (whose suffered more???) then we all lose---because those who are neither black, nor gay and consciously using their privilege to oppress us both will continue to keep us divided, disorganized and bickering among ourselves.

    Someone here made a comment that the person who started this thread was "stirrin shit up" that doesn't matter. I disagree. It matters because this countries denial of racial disparities is its pathology. The sickness spreads and makes people blind to all the ways that racism still infects our society. While i see the advancement we've made, i'm not blind to the work we have left to do. Black White, Brown, Yellow, Gay Straight, Bi, TwinSpirit, LGBTQQLMNOP! We all have shit we need to deal with.

  • MercuryMax

    Posts: 713

    Jun 11, 2009 8:47 PM GMT
    imlistedhere said^^^^^^^^^^^

    lmao @ the aphro romance ad. ..is there some kind of word association that alerts RJ???




    hmm, i dont see it on my screen. but with that in thought, wanna get married?

    MAXlightningKronos.jpg




    OHHH, i see it now...lol
  • MercuryMax

    Posts: 713

    Jun 11, 2009 8:56 PM GMT
    To SanDiegoSon:


    I'd quote you but there was a lot there, so i'm goin straight to my point...

    I'm obviously not black and I'm not considered white to most people who have an IQ slightly above average. However, I don't know what its like to be black. I don't know of the current hardships that blacks of today face. And that is the problem. If there are hardships and such, they need to be brought to light, not just bitched about. I've known people to bitch all day about how they have so many hardships because they're black, but they didn't specify any.

    In a community like ours who should be sympathizing with each other; we should also be there to fight for each other as well. And believe me, I will fight for someone's rights. I just need to know where to fight, ya know. I'm not being negligant because I'm not black and don't know the hardships. I just honestly do not know, because no one will give an example from experience.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Jun 11, 2009 9:04 PM GMT
    SanDiegoSon said'
    Someone here made a comment that the person who started this thread was "stirrin shit up" that doesn't matter. I disagree. It matters because this countries denial of racial disparities is its pathology. The sickness spreads and makes people blind to all the ways that racism still infects our society. While i see the advancement we've made, i'm not blind to the work we have left to do. Black White, Brown, Yellow, Gay Straight, Bi, TwinSpirit, LGBTQQLMNOP! We all have shit we need to deal with.


    I made the 'stirrin' shit up' comment. And i may have been misunderstood. The 'social norm' the gay community has preferred to favor, is a capitalist media driven anglo supported conditioning through trends - fashion and art (of which things most if not many gay men gravitate toward). Like i said before; why not challenge it at its core? Roots still grow. Instead some wait for a magazine's choice in cover design to say something. There is no denying of racial disparities in my words by no means. I just wish people would 'open' their eyes and see how much their minds are being 'brain washed' by popular culture and society.
    Also, as Timberoo stated previously;

    "Are you saying black men are turned away from community centers, serving on committees, charities and other gay organizations?"

    Does the structure in which, and by which, the 'Advocate' advocates and publishes have ethnic voices? This is a magazine, a business still - they probably did this to get your attention so that you would pick up and buy the darn publication so that they can continue to 'program' your mind with the predominantly white male model photos decorated within the literature. Hmmm... maybe there isn't any ethnic voices at the Advocate?!



  • calibro

    Posts: 8888

    Jun 11, 2009 9:18 PM GMT
    I really hate when people take offense to this statement. Of course the plight between African Americans and gays are different; that's not what the statement refers to. Saying gay is the new black refers to the fact the gays are the new group demanding civil liberties. Guess what? Blacks were the new Women's Rights Movement in the 60s. Groups have been fighting for their rights for thousands of years, and for African Americans to take offense to this is ridiculous in my opinion.