Campaign posters in other countries?

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jun 12, 2009 8:05 PM GMT
    I see in news pictures of countries other than the US that campaign posters are often large broadsheets pasted on what appears to be every flat vertical surface....sometimes many posters in one place to make huge displays. Since this isnt done in the US, I am curious about these posters.

    When they are first put up, are they pasted on any veritcal surface? Are they considered an eyesore, like graffiti?

    What happens after the election? How do they come off? Who removes them?

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jun 12, 2009 8:57 PM GMT
    Caslon11000 saidI see in news pictures of countries other than the US that campaign posters are often large broadsheets pasted on what appears to be every flat vertical surface....sometimes many posters in one place to make huge displays. Since this isnt done in the US, I am curious about these posters.

    When they are first put up, are they pasted on any veritcal surface? Are they considered an eyesore, like graffiti?

    What happens after the election? How do they come off? Who removes them?



    We used to have that kind of posters in Mexico, and unless the people pasting them up were dedicated like you mentioned (many posters, carefully pasted to form one big display, which can actually look nice) they were a big eyesore... and then they'll become all yellowish exposed to the rain... ugh

    But, from time to time you still see posters from commercial stuff pasted, but is very rare and is usually forbidden to paste them.

    Nowadays, from political campaigns we only have those plastic posters that hang from electricity and lighting poles. From time to time you see a wall actually painted, but is rarer these days. And of course, lots and lots of billboards. The political parties themselves (or whomever they hired) should remove the publicity a few days before the election, but usually in a few streets they remain, and sometimes billboards are just covered.

  • DCEric

    Posts: 3713

    Jun 12, 2009 9:18 PM GMT
    Caslon11000 saidWhen they are first put up, are they pasted on any veritcal surface? Are they considered an eyesore, like graffiti?

    What happens after the election? How do they come off? Who removes them?


    I've been in the developing world for a number of elections. For the most part the answer to your question is "who cares". Keeping public spaces clean tends to be a luxury that can only be afforded in the developed world (communist countries exempt), and wealthier developing countries, such as Mexico, also are trending towards better clean up after an election- or outright banning of such posters.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jun 12, 2009 9:27 PM GMT
    *ahem* be specific about graffiti.
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    Jun 12, 2009 9:45 PM GMT
    In Denmark, campaign posters are pasted onto a board to hang from lamp posts et.c. The political parties have a deadline to remove their own posters after the election/vote, and they'll be fined by the local government if they fail to do so.
    this way the poster boards can also be used again in new campaigns.
  • DuggerPDX

    Posts: 386

    Jun 12, 2009 9:49 PM GMT
    I know in some countries where illiteracy is high the posters try to associate a candidate with a color or shape so when the voters get their ballot they don't have to find a name, just the color or shape of their candidate/party.

  • coolarmydude

    Posts: 9190

    Jun 12, 2009 9:56 PM GMT
    Usage and rules on usage vary from one locality to the next. I've seen triangular columns in Germany on busy sidewalks that are intended to plaster posters and flyers as posting them on other surfaces would be prohibitive and cost a fine per infraction.

    Here on Ft Bragg and many other military installations, it's not authorized to post personally made garage sale flyers on telephone poles and street signs. The only authorized signage is what you have to sign out from the self-help shop.
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    Jun 13, 2009 12:23 AM GMT
    This is the garbage our 'leaders' put up during election time. They spend millions to get a post that only pays like several hundred thousand a month. Not to mention how many trees went into putting those damn things up. You kinda wonder what they do to get all the money back.

    Plus, they don't even make an effort to clean it up after the elections. It just litters the streets and make even cultural heritage buildings an eyesore.

    Recently though, there have been new laws that limit the posting to certain approved public 'bulletin boards'. But still, you see them violating those laws quite flagrantly and nobody takes notice.

    GOD I HATE OUR POLITICIANS!

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  • DuggerPDX

    Posts: 386

    Jul 01, 2009 1:35 PM GMT
    follow-up

    I just returned from Italy and noticed that campaign posters were pasted only in areas provided by the municipal authorities, it was a very neat and tidy situation. I was in Verona, Milan, Trento and Riva, so it may vary outside of those area's.

    It's amazing how a thread sticks with you and changes what you look for while traveling!