Do you have a famous family ancestor? What is he/she famous for?

  • coolarmydude

    Posts: 9190

    Jun 13, 2009 1:10 AM GMT
    I just happened to think of this and wanted to throw this out there.

    My 5th Great Uncle designed the Washington Monument, amongst other things.

    washington-monument-address.jpg

    Robert Mills (August 12, 1781 – March 3, 1855) is sometimes called the first native born American to become a professional architect, though Charles Bulfinch perhaps has a clearer claim to this honor.

    In 1820, he was appointed as acting commissioner of the Board of Public Works in South Carolina. In 1823, Mills was the superintendent of public buildings. In the next few years, he designed numerous buildings in South Carolina including court houses, the campus of the University of South Carolina, jails, and the Fireproof Building in Charleston. In 1825, he authored an Atlas of the State of South Carolina. One year later, he published Statistics of South Carolina.

    In 1836 he won the competition for the design of the Washington Monument which is his best known work. He also designed the Department of Treasury building and several other federal buildings in Washington, D. C. including the U.S. Patent Office Building. In South Carolina, he designed county courthouses in at least 18 counties, some of the public buildings in Columbia, and a few private homes. He also designed portions of the Landsford Canal, Chester County, on the Catawba River in South Carolina.

    Mills was an early advocate of buildings designed to include fireproof materials. A fire in Kingstree, South Carolina destroyed much of the upper floor of a courthouse called the Fireproof Building which had been designed by Mills, but the county records on the first floor were protected due to his fireproofing measures.
  • Sparkycat

    Posts: 1064

    Jun 13, 2009 7:02 AM GMT
    My ancestry can be traced to King James I, through the male line. I don't know if that means I'm in line for the throne. I think there are a few people ahead of me.
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    Jun 13, 2009 7:12 AM GMT
    I guees the nearer to famous it gets in my family is my maternal great grand father who died a martyr in the Cristero War defending his Roman Catholic faith (practice) against the Mexican government.

    It's so surreal thinking about him in that way... a fight you'll think is from another, well, century. Now, if only he could have seen some of his great grand sons now icon_eek.gif

    BTW, COOLARMYDUDE... Way cool great-great-great grandfather... I can only imagine what does it feels looking that monument knowing that.
  • stevendust

    Posts: 398

    Jun 13, 2009 7:13 AM GMT
    Crazy Horse and Chief Spotted Tail.
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    Jun 13, 2009 7:23 AM GMT
    jprichva saidThe chief rabbi of Amsterdam in Rembrandt's day.
    Not that this is so significant, but Rembrandt painted his portrait, which hangs in the Jewish Museum there. I'd like to go one day and see what an actual ancestor looked like.
    Is this him? Looks kinda like you icon_biggrin.gif
    http://taichateau.files.wordpress.com/2008/06/r2.jpg
  • justinscotts

    Posts: 75

    Jun 13, 2009 7:28 AM GMT
    My great Grandmother was known (historically) as The Wash Woman of Mauna Kauai or Kai or some Mauna... in Hawaii during WWII...that's all I got so far...
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    Jun 13, 2009 7:38 AM GMT
    jprichva saidHonestly? I have no idea. Where was that picture from?
    I went to google images and looked up Jewish rabbi Rembrandt .. i can't fond the original page, but several seemed to suggest he painted a lot of Jewish people ..

    here http://taichateau.wordpress.com/2008/06/19/rounders-quote/

    here is another that looks like the same rabbi
    http://www.fineartprintsondemand.com/artists/rembrandt/rabbi.htm
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    Jun 13, 2009 7:54 AM GMT
    coolarmydude saidI just happened to think of this and wanted to throw this out there.

    My great-great-great grandfather designed the Washington Monument, amongst other things.

    washington-monument-address.jpg

    Robert Mills (August 12, 1781 – March 3, 1855) is sometimes called the first native born American to become a professional architect, though Charles Bulfinch perhaps has a clearer claim to this honor.

    In 1820, he was appointed as acting commissioner of the Board of Public Works in South Carolina. In 1823, Mills was the superintendent of public buildings. In the next few years, he designed numerous buildings in South Carolina including court houses, the campus of the University of South Carolina, jails, and the Fireproof Building in Charleston. In 1825, he authored an Atlas of the State of South Carolina. One year later, he published Statistics of South Carolina.

    In 1836 he won the competition for the design of the Washington Monument which is his best known work. He also designed the Department of Treasury building and several other federal buildings in Washington, D. C. including the U.S. Patent Office Building. In South Carolina, he designed county courthouses in at least 18 counties, some of the public buildings in Columbia, and a few private homes. He also designed portions of the Landsford Canal, Chester County, on the Catawba River in South Carolina.

    Mills was an early advocate of buildings designed to include fireproof materials. A fire in Kingstree, South Carolina destroyed much of the upper floor of a courthouse called the Fireproof Building which had been designed by Mills, but the county records on the first floor were protected due to his fireproofing measures.


    I have no idea how to find out without paying for it
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    Jun 13, 2009 8:19 AM GMT
    The family claims my great grandfather was the first rice farmer in Arkansas. According to this book, he was a big part of the effort, but his neighbor (and brother-in-law) gets credit for being the actual pioneer of rice production in the state.
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    Jun 13, 2009 8:34 AM GMT
    coolarmydude saidMy great-great-great grandfather designed the Washington Monument, amongst other things.

    Robert Mills (August 12, 1781 – March 3, 1855)

    Is that enough "greats"? That doesnt seem like enough generations for someone born in 1781.
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    Jun 13, 2009 8:34 AM GMT
    Very distantly related to Jefferson Davis, the President of the Confederacy. Not something I'm proud of in any way, shape, or form, but still kind of cool/interesting (I guess?) nonetheless.
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    Jun 13, 2009 9:32 AM GMT
    coolarmydude saidI just happened to think of this and wanted to throw this out there.

    My great-great-great grandfather designed the Washington Monument, amongst other things.


    That's quite an honorable heritage. Even a little touching.


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    Jun 13, 2009 9:34 AM GMT
    jprichva saidThe chief rabbi of Amsterdam in Rembrandt's day.
    Not that this is so significant, but Rembrandt painted his portrait, which hangs in the Jewish Museum there. I'd like to go one day and see what an actual ancestor looked like.


    I'll be in Amsterdam next week. I'll be sure to check it out!
  • coolarmydude

    Posts: 9190

    Jun 13, 2009 10:49 AM GMT
    wyrln said, "The family claims my great grandfather was the first rice farmer in Arkansas. According to this book, he was a big part of the effort, but his neighbor (and brother-in-law) gets credit for being the actual pioneer of rice production in the state."


    I find that interesting considering that where I'm from in south Louisiana, we have a lot of rice fields and it's one of our biggest crops in the area. In 1974, my grandfather on my mother's side had the best rated sugarcane crop in the state of Louisiana.
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    Jun 13, 2009 2:40 PM GMT
    I personally don't think so... but my father thinks he's God's gift to the world. Does that count?

    BTW, coolarmydude, that IS really cool!
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    Jun 13, 2009 2:42 PM GMT
    my great great great great great great great grandfather was the pirate Sir Francis Drake icon_biggrin.gif

    yup, I'm a pirate by blood
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    Jun 13, 2009 2:43 PM GMT
    i am a son of god.
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    Jun 13, 2009 2:55 PM GMT
    One of my direct Dutch ancestors founded a New Jersey city in the 1600s, originally named after him (his house is now a museum), and another did the same in the 1850s. Among others in my direct bloodline is a General in the US Revolutionary War, a hero of the Civil War, and soldiers in every war the US has ever fought before me.

    I'm the only undistinguished slug in the bunch. icon_sad.gif
  • coolarmydude

    Posts: 9190

    Jun 13, 2009 2:56 PM GMT
    SAHEM62896 said, "I personally don't think so... but my father thinks he's God's gift to the world. Does that count?"

    That depends on how hung he is. icon_wink.gificon_lol.gif
  • ShawnTX

    Posts: 2484

    Jun 13, 2009 7:31 PM GMT
    One of my ancestors was the first recorded French farmer in Canada (on my fathers side).
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    Jun 13, 2009 7:47 PM GMT
    surferdude1101 saidmy great great great great great great great grandfather was the pirate Sir Francis Drake icon_biggrin.gif

    yup, I'm a pirate by blood



    Drake wasn't a Pirate!
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    Jun 14, 2009 2:21 PM GMT
    dashdashdash said
    surferdude1101 saidmy great great great great great great great grandfather was the pirate Sir Francis Drake icon_biggrin.gif

    yup, I'm a pirate by blood



    Drake wasn't a Pirate!


    He was a privateer. Which means he attacked and looted Spanish galleons and trading towns under the Queen's blessings.

    A pirate by any other name... LOL

    We now have the Geneva Convention so yeah, he was a pirate! icon_razz.gif
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    Jun 14, 2009 2:30 PM GMT
    dashdashdash saidDrake wasn't a Pirate!

    Correct, he held a naval commission under Queen Elizabeth I, was given command of a part of the English fleet for a time, and had Royal Letters of Marque for his other naval enterprises (aka privateering). The Spanish, however, did view him as a kind of pirate, and at various times wanted to prosecute him as such.
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    Jun 14, 2009 2:59 PM GMT

    My most colorful ancestor is John S. Mosby of Mosby's Raiders. He originated Guerilla warfare.
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    Jun 14, 2009 3:44 PM GMT
    My grandfather helped found United Air Transport in the 1920s, which became United Air Lines. One of his grandfathers was Senator John Logan (Illinois) who is credited with co-founding Decoration Day (now Memorial Day) and who ran unsuccessfully for vice president in 1884 (James Blaines was running for president).

    Another relative on my Mom's side was Henry Phipps - who was treasurer and later v.p. of Carnegie Steel and founder of Bessemer Trust.

    None of these relatives was "famous" really - - - and my grandmother used to say, "None of us is very far removed from a pick - or a shovel."