So tired recently

  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Jun 17, 2009 7:00 PM GMT

    Thee are many things I admire about this site. You guys are full of life, look fantastic and know a lot about fitness. I am pretty 'senior', am in the Uk and still work as a personal trainer. So I ought to know the answer to the question!

    I see clients three days a week. Every week for myself I do 2 high intensity cv sessions (heart rate 80%+ of maximum heart rate) and 3 resistance sessions which in sequence are: legs, chest/back, arms/shoulders. I do core work when I do my cv stuff.

    For the last 3 months I have been doing a timed eccentric resistance technique - using heavy weights I have a 1s concentric phase and a 3 s eccentric phase ( the DOMS can be severe!) continuing for 50s with 90s rest between sets. One of the reasons for this is that at my age it is difficult to increase muscle bulk - but this technique maintains muscle and body shape. (body fat % is 10.5)

    But for the last 2 weeks I have been so tired and just don't have the energy to train (which is scary for a PT!) The medics say there is nothing the matter with me. So any suggestions are welcome. Thank you.

  • Timbales

    Posts: 13993

    Jun 17, 2009 7:05 PM GMT
    Have to ask the obvious questions first - are you getting enough sleep? are you getting a restful sleep or is it disturbed? have you changed your diet at all? is there anything going on in your private life that may be affecting you emotionally?
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Jun 17, 2009 7:32 PM GMT
    10 weeks of a new, hard training technique may, at your age, be getting into the possible area of overtraining. Try a week off (as you know, you won´t lose any muscle during that) and sleep as much as you can, eat well and use your gym time for watching old favorite films or gentle swimming. DO NOT FEEL GUILTY and do not try and do ANYTHING to retain your fitness.

    Then try again. It could just be that the higher intensity means you need more recovery than the "books" say. I seem to think that Clarence Bass dropped his training down to one HIIT and one resistance training session a week with regular walking as he aged.

  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Jun 17, 2009 10:29 PM GMT
    Like Lostboy said, taking a week off is the best thing you can do for yourself, then give yourself a couple of easier weeks to rebuild and maybe intergrate some different types of workouts that aren't as physically taxing. Then you can put in a week at higher intensity to see how you feel. I went through something similar...you sound burned out, and the tiredness is a symptom of overtraining. You can hurt yourself if you try to hang on to your routine because your body is trying to tell you it needs a break.

    Recently, I got really burned out from too much running, so I took a week off, and I'm taking a down month. I intergrated some heavier weights and the result is I'm running a lot stronger than I was on higher mileage. I know I have not lost anything on my fitness, as I ran a 2 mile time last night that matched up with my 5k times in the Spring.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Jun 18, 2009 12:12 AM GMT
    I chatted to the OP after my post. He is a former medical doctor and has full training as a personal trainer. He did say in the OP that "The medics say there is nothing the matter with me." 5 high intensity sessions a week is quite a lot, even for me at 32, if they are truly high intensity.

    Hoping that the week´s rest will make the difference

    icon_biggrin.gif
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Jun 18, 2009 3:23 AM GMT
    For me, not drinking enough water / getting adequate sleep are major contributors.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Jun 18, 2009 6:53 AM GMT
    Thanks very much guys. I'm taking your advice and not going near the gym for a week. The sun is shining here ( we have had a rubbish June in the UK so far) so later today I will go for a gentle cycle ride along our beautiful river. I have also been looking at my work schedule and when I stand back from it it is crazy busy. So I need to look at that too.

    You know, there is no comparable web site in the Uk to RJ which is a pity
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Jun 18, 2009 7:01 AM GMT
    I am sure you have been checked for prostate cancer. Fatigue is the only symptom I had....after 2 years of having the cancer! ... icon_eek.gif
  • swogdog

    Posts: 143

    Jun 18, 2009 8:17 AM GMT
    Caslon11000 saidI am sure you have been checked for prostate cancer. Fatigue is the only symptom I had....after 2 years of having the cancer! ... icon_eek.gif


    I agree that with Caslon that it's worth a look if you haven't had yourself checked. Fatigue can be a symptom of an otherwise asymptomatic cancer. However, it's probably just overwork related fatigue, and others have covered that.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Jun 18, 2009 9:02 AM GMT
    Thanks guys - all the male health checks were fine. But I agree, the big 'C' somewhere was my first thought.


  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Jun 18, 2009 9:50 AM GMT
    You may want to look into the possibility of Adrenal Fatigue. Whenever we get stressed, either through emotional stress of physical exertion, we run the risk of putting our adrenal glands into overproduction, followed by extreme fatigue.

    I've had what seems to be chronic fatigue for about 6 years and many people have suggested a link between the adrenal glands and feeling this way.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Jun 18, 2009 12:27 PM GMT
    It might simply be that YOU'RE 67! GOD! You're a PT at 67, that's amazing. From what I can tell from your picture, you even look amazing. The fatigue might just be an inevitable thing no matter how fit you are. Sheesh, maybe you just need to incorporate a nap into your day. It wouldn't be a sin.

    It could also be that you have a 16 inch chest and a 13 inch waist and you're exhausted from shopping for clothes that fit. Just a theory.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Jun 18, 2009 1:32 PM GMT
    All the recommendations are great and true. One thing you may want to look into is a the possibility sleep disorder if it continues to be a problem. I found that my primary physician kept waving off my sleep issues about being tired. I could sleep 12 hours etc and still wake up tired etc. So I took the bull by the horns and went to a sleep disorders/ENT/pulmonolgist office and did a sleep test. They found that I had sleep apnea. My actual results found that I stopped breathing or woke up from REM sleep once every five minutes. The issue that my primary physician kept being so blase about was actually a diagnosable disorder. Your issue is probably not sleep apnea but there are a whole host of sleep disorder issues that affect fatigue and it never hurts to investigate it further if it continues to be a problem for you.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Jun 18, 2009 1:50 PM GMT
    McGay saidIt might simply be that YOU'RE 67! GOD! You're a PT at 67, that's amazing. From what I can tell from your picture, you even look amazing. The fatigue might just be an inevitable thing no matter how fit you are. Sheesh, maybe you just need to incorporate a nap into your day. It wouldn't be a sin.

    It could also be that you have a 16 inch chest and a 13 inch waist and you're exhausted from shopping for clothes that fit. Just a theory.


    Hey all you guys are really helpful - oh and just for the record - 40 inch chest and 32 waist, and I hate shopping!

    And just another thought - what is so amazing about being a PT at 67.?It has 2 advantages: (a) older people are very happy to have an older PT (b) believe it or not it really motivates the younger guys.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Jun 18, 2009 4:51 PM GMT
    I guess it's amazing as it compares to the rest of the general population of the whole world. I don't know the stats, but, I'm guessing that under 5% of the population over the age of 65 isn't sedentary.

    I'd be happy to have a PT who's 67. If he can live that well to that age, then he's got stuff he can teach me.
  • GQjock

    Posts: 11649

    Jun 22, 2009 2:53 PM GMT
    As you probably already know our bodies don't recuperate as rapidly as they did when we were 25

    after 35 and 45 and 55 we are going to have to calibrate how much rest our bodies will need after any form of exercise

    If we overtrain we aren't going to see the results we want
    we're going to feel very tired and we are making ourselves vulnerable to injury