Is anyone else affected by low barometric pressure?

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    Jun 18, 2009 8:34 PM GMT
    We just had a very rainy morning here and the low barometric pressure just wipes me out. I hardly want to get out of bed. Does anyone else respond that way to low barometric pressure?
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    Jun 18, 2009 9:13 PM GMT
    Is that what's wrong with me today?

    funny-pictures-dustpan-kitten-is-sleepy.
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    Jun 18, 2009 9:22 PM GMT
    Yeah i am the same. I am a human barometer. I can tell when a storm is coming in and it kills me
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    Jun 18, 2009 9:51 PM GMT
    Hey Cas,
    Ever since I broke my arm last year I've had aches in my joints and a pretty good headache, right around the time the pressure changes either up or down. I asked my Dr and he said it happens to a lot of people after they break a bone or 2. Something to do w/the fact that you have opened up a sealed space, or something like that. Sorry if I'm not making much sense. The Dr just said to get used to it cause it will be that way forever now and to be careful if I go deep sea diving.
  • Timbales

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    Jun 18, 2009 10:05 PM GMT
    My sinuses and the damaged joints are very susceptible to changes in barometric pressure. It sucks.
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    Jun 19, 2009 12:44 AM GMT
    BJJMMAFighter saidYeah i am the same. I am a human barometer. I can tell when a storm is coming in and it kills me

    You got it man!
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    Jun 19, 2009 1:05 AM GMT
    Yup, i get very low energy and a little moody
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    Jun 19, 2009 1:14 AM GMT
    when I was much younger, I would get pain in my knees whenever there was a drop in pressure. It's never affected my mood or energy level though.
  • Pheo

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    Jun 19, 2009 1:23 AM GMT
    My ears pop when it's below 28. Usually that's a sign of tornadic weather.
  • barriehomeboy

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    Jun 19, 2009 1:31 AM GMT
    I have a really cool antique ship's barometer. It's like a teapot with a sealed lid so the only way the air pressure can equalize is through the spout. There is an air-fluid level inside the ...thing. When the air pressure outside drops, water rises up the spout. When the air pressure outside rises, it pushed the water back down the spout. They used it to know when they were floating into a storm.

    Your sinuses work the same way. When the sinus passages are blocked though (sinusitis) and a low pressure system moves in, the pressure inside your paranasal sinuses builds up, and you get that being stabbed behind your nose sensation.

    I'll think about the bones and joints thing and get back to you. I'm a medical imaging technologist, so it's not inconceivable that I could think something up.

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    Jun 19, 2009 11:28 AM GMT
    it really has the opposite effect on me. i'm usually aware when a storm is moving in because my energy level goes up icon_smile.gif there's something sublime about a good summer thunderstorm.
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    Jun 19, 2009 11:29 AM GMT
    It definitely affects me. My patience just plummets when the barometer falls.
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    Jun 19, 2009 11:47 AM GMT
    When I was growing up, I never believed my grandparents that an approaching storm made their joints ache. Now that I'm getting close to their age I have become a firm believer that it does.icon_smile.gif

    I found this article in the today's BBC Weather about behavior and weather.
    Atmospheric pressure is continually fluctuating, and researchers in the Ukraine have found that slight low-frequency atmospheric oscillations can influence human mental activity, causing significant changes in attention and short term memory functions. So next time you find it hard to concentrate at work, blame it on the pressure!

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/weather/features/health_culture/behaviour.shtml
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    Jun 19, 2009 11:56 AM GMT
    kneedraggen saidWhen I was growing up, I never believed my grandparents that an approaching storm made their joints ache. Now that I'm getting close to their age I have become a firm believer that it does.icon_smile.gif

    I found this article in the today's BBC Weather about behavior and weather.
    Atmospheric pressure is continually fluctuating, and researchers in the Ukraine have found that slight low-frequency atmospheric oscillations can influence human mental activity, causing significant changes in attention and short term memory functions. So next time you find it hard to concentrate at work, blame it on the pressure!

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/weather/features/health_culture/behaviour.shtml

    Thanks for the article. Even wind can affect people's mood....who knew?

    "The exact reason why these winds have such extreme effects is unknown, but it has been suggested that it may be the electrical charge of the air. When people are exposed to negatively charged air they report feeling positive and vice versa. Warm winds, such as those mentioned above are positively charged.

    Homes and offices today are built to be airtight. Heating and air-conditioning depletes negative ions, leaving the positive ones to re-circulate and reduce our moods. As we spend less and less time outside due to pressures at work and home our bodies are also going to be less exposed and less adapted to different weather conditions.

    But if you've ever wondered why the air feels so good after a heavy downpour - it's nature's way of creating negative ions, so get outside and soak them up!"
  • markw67

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    Jun 19, 2009 12:04 PM GMT
    Yeah it feels like I cant breathe. I have always thought it was due asthma, as it has always been worst at high altitudes
  • Sebastian18

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    Jun 19, 2009 1:14 PM GMT
    I don't know about you guys, but maybe being the product of the NW that I am I find it easier to operate when the barometric pressure is low. Temperatures over 75* tend to be the thing that wipe me out and make me feel all gross.

    In similar news, I'm glad to report that it's raining once again in Seattle and we missed our longest Spring dry-spell by eleven minutes. My sinuses are feeling great now that the cotton-wood pollen is dirt-bound. icon_razz.gif
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    Jun 19, 2009 1:20 PM GMT
    Low pressure makes my ears start popping - It's like someone is snapping their fingers but inside my head and I get that feeling in my stomach that you only get when you go over a big hill really fast.

    Ugh... can anyone rewire my vestibular system?
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    Jun 19, 2009 3:46 PM GMT
    Low and high pressure both get to me.... why can't it just always remain some what in the middle???
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    Jun 24, 2009 2:16 PM GMT
    I am a weather station, I'm extremely accurate and can predict the weather 2 days in advance, basically due to how much pain I'm in and where, I too suffer from low barometric pressure, my threshold is approximately 29 and rising or 30 and falling, anywhere between nd I'm miserable. I carry a hygrometer, everywhere I go. It gives me up to date barometric readings, temperature changes and weather changes on the spot to test my accuracy. It's very uncanny ;-)
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    Jun 24, 2009 2:18 PM GMT
    Caslon11000 saidWe just had a very rainy morning here and the low barometric pressure just wipes me out. I hardly want to get out of bed. Does anyone else respond that way to low barometric pressure?


    I get a headache as it begins to fall
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    Jun 24, 2009 2:28 PM GMT
    yeah barometric pressure can wipe me out for the day- and most noticeably i've found that quick changes in it give me awful headaches.
  • Timbales

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    Jun 25, 2009 7:49 PM GMT
    We have a massive front hovering to the west. My left ear started hurting about an hour ago, and now it feels like someone punched the side of my head.
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    Jun 25, 2009 7:55 PM GMT
    It will wipe me out for the entire day - especially after I have been to the gym in the morning. Makes me very lethargic, and I usually end up with a sinus headache before it passes over. icon_rolleyes.gif