When 'Fluffy' Attacks

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    Nov 19, 2007 7:34 AM GMT


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  • HndsmKansan

    Posts: 16305

    Nov 19, 2007 9:08 AM GMT
    Well I think the article could have been written in a little different way and still have emphasized several important points.

    I'm a dog owner and always try and approach everything
    responsibly... shots, leashes, encouraging appropriate behavior, even leaving a light on in the house for them at night when I'm gone. But I'm aware there are others in the area that may not view their responsibilities the same way.

    Yesterday my bf and I were walking our 3 beagles in the neighborhood (on leashes of course) and suddently someones larger dog bolted out a neighbors door and came running at us. While the neighbor did come to retrieve his dog, he didn't act too concerned.. and the dog did run at us. We didn't react negatively (at all), but what if there had been an issue?

    Many people look at their companions as "objects". They don't matter, they aren't relevant, aren't important to them. Why wouldn't those animals act out?
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    Nov 19, 2007 9:50 PM GMT
    Hey Kansan, I have a beagle too...ain't they the best? I have a lab/dalmatian mix too, he's a sweet goofy guy. When I lived in Virginia, my beagle used to kill small animals (possums, mainly) that wandered onto my property (which was heavily wooded). I think she was concerned that I didn't appear to know how to hunt, so she was teaching me. However, I never let them run free on any neighbor's land. When we go out they are always leashed. And the poop is picked up.
  • EricLA

    Posts: 3461

    Nov 20, 2007 2:16 AM GMT
    If only there were tests to check for worthiness of owning a pet. Or having children, for that matter. I have a small dog, so it's easy to clean up after her. But, there are rare times when she takes more than one dump during a walk and I don't have a second bag with me. I almost always come back and pick it up (Okay, I admit I'm not perfect -- but I do pick it up a vast majority of the time). As for piss, how am I supposed to pick that up?

    As for being on leash, I'm with you on that one. If your dog isn't Lassie obedient (i.e. smarter than you are), then you shouldn't be walking your dog off leash. By Jack Russell loves to stalk squirrels. If she saw one while off leash, I'm sure she'd run after it and ignore whatever commands I was telling her, even though she's a very well trained dog by Jack Russell standards. It's all about knowing your dog and what's realistic.
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    Nov 20, 2007 2:42 AM GMT
    Yes, I suppose a dog should be on the leash all the time, but, and if you've ever had a dog how do you tell them that? Honestly we expect more of dogs than ourselves, and dogs don't have the mental capacity we do. Yes, they are social, pack animals, conditioned by being around humans, but that doesn't mean they fit our life or schedules all that well.

    By instinct my dog will chase anyting, and yes, I'm a bad or good parent who lets him off the leash to do what he wants -- this is both good and bad as he's come close to killing himself, but I can't let myself inhibit him completely in places he can be free to be himself -- I know, maybe I'm a bad parent, but I take that risk, and he does learn -- there are risks in chasing cayotes, and he doesn't chase them anymore, after some life threatening experiences. I want my dog to be the best he can, but that is living somewhat vicariously as a dog with I'm no sure I can do. I guess I feel he is a being that can experience life as well as I can. I don't feel I can't protect him, or should from everything. To some degree that makes me an extremely neurotic parent -- it would be easier on me to keep him always leashed -- but I'm caught between always keeping him safe, as best I know how, and letting him be as much dog as he, with his limited brain, knows how. I assure you that this is not theory, but every day life as the issues of cayotes or rattlesnakes are things I could encounter daily, and things I must decide what is the best action to take and not something he an take into account.
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    Nov 20, 2007 2:54 AM GMT
    Okay, I'm taking up space that maybe I shouldn't be, but I have an Italian Greyhoud who by nature will chase anything, cayotes, rabbits, deer, bicycles, you name it. He has learnt that that isn't always safe so he usually sticks to lizzards, and now hesitates for anything bigger, including snakes. That has been a process of training, experience and intelligence. I can't say for every dog or situation, but remember that dogs, more than us, base their small brain matter discisions on instinct, and that that is their ultimate guide.
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    Nov 20, 2007 3:40 AM GMT
    werick said: "...but I have an Italian Greyhound... remember that dogs, more than us, base their small brain matter discisions on instinct..."

    Hah. Is that just Italian Greyhounds, or Greyhounds in general? Or is that a comment on us Italians.icon_twisted.gif

    True, enough...I often act on instinct and drool a lot.

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    Nov 20, 2007 4:00 AM GMT
    Fastprof, the name, well in English, and I can't say otherwise refers to their popularity in Italy during the renaissance, but they probably originated in Anatolia or somewhere else in the Middel East, at least that is what I have been told.

    They are sight hounds, and behave as such, I have encountered more than one person, on seeing my dog, who told me that they or their relatives used greyhounds, the full sized ones, to hunt cayotes, and the greyhouds, not miniatrues, performed very well in hunting them down, and that their instinct was the chase.

    As for drooling, my dog doesn't drool often, so I can't say. But is droolng after a hot male a bad thing? Can neither deny nor confirm the above observation. All I can say is that my dog, and this is following instinct, knows what derserves his attention or not, and can you do like-wise when it comes to the male species?
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    Nov 20, 2007 4:06 AM GMT
    werick "...and can you do like-wise when it comes to the male species?..."

    Yes, as you know, I can and do. icon_biggrin.gif