Swimming Pool?

  • ChilaxinJOCK0...

    Posts: 1513

    Jun 28, 2009 1:56 AM GMT
    Ive never really swam laps in the pool b4 for exercise but I want to begin tommorrow....Whats a smart way to start without killing/drowning myself/?? Then once i've been doing it for a while what is a good amount of laps to be doing for a good workout? I am kind of clueless...lookin for advice from u swimmers
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jun 28, 2009 3:28 AM GMT
    How clueless are you? Do you know to blow out when you put your head in the water and take a breath when you turn it to the side? I know that sounds basic but I've had to explain this to people who would hold their breath when they put their head in the water.

    A good swimming stroke is very technical and like all sports swimming requires a certain rhythm. Without the rhythm you will not last long. It might be a good idea to take a stroke clinic and learn the flip turn. Having a good flip turn and rhythm will allow you to become very relaxed and meditative in the water.
  • ChilaxinJOCK0...

    Posts: 1513

    Jun 28, 2009 3:31 AM GMT
    hahaha no...i figurd i didnt write that clearly. I know how to swim and i can swim pretty well and fast. I just dont know how many laps to do. Or what is usually a pretty moderate pool workout (as in laps and wat not) I dont wanna end up doing like 10 laps, being winded and thinkin i did good or somethin when in reality its weak as hell...thats how im clueless i guess
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    Jun 28, 2009 3:38 AM GMT
    Swimming is a great workout, glad to hear you're getting back into it. I've been doing a group swim workout and am going up to the next level in July. Currently, they have us on a moderate program which is usually something like:

    Warm Up:
    100M freestyle
    50M breath stroke
    50M back stroke
    100M freestyle

    Then, for the main workout, we did something like:
    4 sets of 100M freestyle, with 30 seconds rest in between each 100M
    100M of flutter kick
    100M of pull (freestyle arms, no kicking, legs just float with a pull-buoy)
    100M of breath stroke

    Then, to cool down, a slow 100M freestyle.

    Maybe give that a try, being mindful of your time for the 100M's, and not resting for too long between sets? We did the above in about 1 hr. It's not a full mile but gets mighty close.

    Good luck!
  • wander2340

    Posts: 176

    Jun 28, 2009 4:10 AM GMT
    Thank you Eric! Your post is very helpful.
  • jrs1

    Posts: 4388

    Jun 28, 2009 4:16 AM GMT

    what eric said is fine. then, once your endurance and speed increases, you can begin to use an interval/intermittent timer for your workouts.


    example: competitive swimmers may use 10 x 100yds free on the interval of 1:10, while recreational swimmers may use 5 x 100yds free on the interval of 1:25/1:30 seconds per 100 yds.

    you can always google lap-swimming suggestions and even read an excerpt from men's health.

    but, either way, you'll be rewarded for your efforts.
    swimming is an amazingly beneficial cardiovascular workout!

    have fun!
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jun 28, 2009 4:16 AM GMT
    Here's a site I use for workouts. You can customize the workouts to suit your swimming level.

    http://www.swimplan.com/
  • Anto

    Posts: 2035

    Jun 28, 2009 5:14 AM GMT
    yeah use swimplan.com.

    As part of your profile you can input the times from time trials it asks for on the site in the fitness test section so that the generated workouts are more suited to your fitness level. You can also select what kind of gear you have available, pool length, time frame you want to do it in, and what kind of strokes you know how to do. When the site generates a workout it will take those variables into account. You can have up to 5 workout plans generated per day and save your favorite ones.

    As you get better you can tell it to generate more difficult ones or easier ones if you are feeling tired or fatigued.

    It is a really good site. The workouts are similar to what I was given in college.
    The workouts also have instructions for each set on how to do them (can turn it off if want). They are also highlighted according to target heart rate ranges as well.


    Don't start off too hard though. Swimming can be very demanding on the body. I remember reading an article once about how people who weren't prepared for triathlon competitions most often died during the swimming phase from heart attacks.
    http://www.usatoday.com/news/health/2009-03-29-triathlon-heart_N.htm

    A good way to check on yourself is to monitor your heart rate during the exercise and keep it within the target zones. That way you can see if you are pushing yourself too hard or not.
  • ChilaxinJOCK0...

    Posts: 1513

    Jun 28, 2009 5:32 AM GMT
    ok cool dude.....thnks, yall have some great advice
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    Jun 28, 2009 12:11 PM GMT
    One more thing to note, per friendormate's post: The quality of your stroke will make a huge difference in your workout. Even small adjustments in how/where your hands enter the water, breathing rhythm, etc all make a big difference in your swimming and your workout. If you start getting into a regular schedule, it'd definitely be wise to invest in a Stroke Improvement class, to be sure you're being as efficient as possible.
  • Anto

    Posts: 2035

    Jun 28, 2009 12:37 PM GMT
    Yeah, also, if you do a stroke incorrectly it can possibly lead to injury.

    Here is a 45 minute video of Jason Lezak teaching the freestyle stroke at a university:


  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jun 28, 2009 12:49 PM GMT
    If there are other lap-swimmers in the pool, don't interrupt their swim but try to strike up a conversation to see if there is a local group that meets to swim. You can also ask the lifeguard. Meeting up with others swimmers is one of the best ways. You could also find a mini-triathlon training group and join them to get some advice and camaraderie surrounding your swim work outs.