Is it wrong to use someone else's bandwidth?

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jun 28, 2009 9:10 PM GMT
    For some reason I can't get on the net using my WiFi so I'm using my neighbour's. Is this morally wrong? Can I get caught doing it?
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    Jun 28, 2009 9:32 PM GMT
    morally questionable yes, I know internet access in the UK aint free for everyone

    but unless the person is looking or has monitoring setup, he probably wont know and that fact he has an open wifi, means he probably aint got a clue whats going on
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    Jun 28, 2009 9:32 PM GMT
    Not sure the legality of that in the US, if your neighbor hasn't applied security protections, and you're not hacking into those passwords. My Mac automatically poaches my neighbor's unprotected Wi-Fi signal whenever my own wireless router loses the Internet for a moment. Your neighbor is transmitting that Wi-Fi signal into your house, and one might argue that if he doesn't want it poached, then it's his responsibility to protect it with password access, as I do with mine.
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    Jun 28, 2009 9:41 PM GMT
    What's annoying is his wifi's faster than mine.
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    Jun 28, 2009 9:47 PM GMT
    In some states in the US, it is a felony to access someone else's bandwidth.

    I remember the case of one really stupid person who repeatedly parked in front of some guy's house and accessed his connection. Dude, at least, find several places and mix them up so it doesnt become routine. Damn!

    But you can just encrypt and password protect your router so people cant do it.

    In the UK, back in 2005 some guy got nailed for doing it...

    "A recent court case, which saw a West London man fined £500 and sentenced to 12 months' conditional discharge for hijacking a wireless broadband connection, has repercussions for almost every user of wi-fi networks."

    http://tinyurl.com/ndtjzg

    In your case, Red, just have your "bfs" put whether they have wifi internet connection on their applications. Then you can check them out for encryption, and make a map of accessible points thruout London....England....Europe.....the World.....I dont know how far your "geographic limit" for a bf goes .... Do you have a geographic limit? .....any limits? ....dead?... Is that a limit??? ... icon_rolleyes.gif

    j/k ... icon_lol.gif
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    Jun 28, 2009 9:59 PM GMT
    redheadguy saidWhat's annoying is his wifi's faster than mine.
    then you need to get better broadband access.
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    Jun 28, 2009 10:53 PM GMT
    If you're questioning the morality of the situation, then why not just knock on your neighbor's door and ask?

    I make my wifi free and available to everyone. Of course, they don't know I'm also collecting their private information.
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    Jun 28, 2009 11:01 PM GMT
    xrichx saidIf you're questioning the morality of the situation, then why not just knock on your neighbor's door and ask?

    I make my wifi free and available to everyone. Of course, they don't know I'm also collecting their private information.

    Actually, making wifi access available to others may be a crime, because you are letting others use the service providers services without their permission....it's a kin to running a cable over to your neighbor's house and letting them tap into your cable service. That's illegal.

    "The Access Point Felony
    Even putting up an unencrypted, unprotected wireless access point might conceivably get you in trouble. Let's say that it's a nice day out, and you want to sit in Riverside park on the Upper West Side and enjoy the day. So you plug your Linksys 802.11(g) access point into your cable modem, and sit outside.

    You're busted! You see, when you "broadcast" the cable connection, you are opening it up for anyone to potentially use it. So other people can potentially get Internet access from Comcast without paying for it. In Maryland, for example, it is illegal to use an "unlawful telecommunication device" which is a "device, technology, [or] product . . used to provide the unauthorized . . . transmission of . . access to, or acquisition of a telecommunication service provided by a telecommunication service provider." Delaware, Florida, Illinois, Michigan, Virginia and Wyoming all have laws on the books that may do the same thing.

    These laws generally treat "sharing" of Internet connections the same way it would treat "sharing" of Cable TV or Satellite TV services. Thus, while you could invite your neighbors in to watch the latest episode of The Sopranos, you probably couldn't hook a coax into apartment 3B so they could watch from home -- at least without getting the permission of the cable TV company.

    You can see this in, for example, Verizon's personal DSL agreement, which states that "[y]ou may not resell the DSL Service, use it for high-volume purposes, or engage in similar activities that constitute resale (commercial or non-commercial), as determined solely by Verizon." So, if Verizon determines that your 802.11 connection constitutes a non-commercial resale (and is unauthorized) not only can it cut you off, but it can make you a felon."

    http://www.securityfocus.com/columnists/237
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    Jun 29, 2009 1:09 AM GMT
    xrichx saidIf you're questioning the morality of the situation, then why not just knock on your neighbor's door and ask?

    I make my wifi free and available to everyone. Of course, they don't know I'm also collecting their private information.

    also you not being a law enforcement department, you secretly collecting others information is also a crime, you need to warn any user you collect information on that you are indeed connecting said information..
  • Timbales

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    Jun 29, 2009 1:12 AM GMT
    IMO, if they didn't secure their wireless, then they shouldn't mind people using it. It's not hard to do.
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    Jun 29, 2009 2:39 AM GMT
    Timberoo saidIMO, if they didn't secure their wireless, then they shouldn't mind people using it. It's not hard to do.

    So it's not the thief's fault. It's your fault if you dont have everything secured so the thief couldnt steal it. ... icon_rolleyes.gif ... Sweet! Crime wave, here I come. ... icon_lol.gif
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    Jun 29, 2009 3:11 AM GMT
    LOL. The collecting private information bit was a joke.

    I was just trying to make a point that freeloading off of someone's wifi carries some risks. icon_lol.gif