Alien life found living in North Carolina sewer

  • Timbales

    Posts: 13993

    Jun 30, 2009 6:41 PM GMT
    http://www.wimp.com/lifeform/

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    Jun 30, 2009 7:11 PM GMT
    http://www.wimp.com/lifeform/
  • zakariahzol

    Posts: 2241

    Jun 30, 2009 8:18 PM GMT
    That look like some sci fi alien creature. Further study , need to be done on what it eat and how it live on. Before it to late.........
  • Timbales

    Posts: 13993

    Jun 30, 2009 8:20 PM GMT
    I hope Sedative isn't angry we found this.
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    Jun 30, 2009 9:18 PM GMT
    What bothers me is it looks like its reacting to light/camera. That shit is messed up. Probably the antichrist's minions growing in their external wombs waiting for the right moment to arise and destroy mankind.
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    Jun 30, 2009 9:22 PM GMT
    ScottPensacola saidProbably the antichrist's minions growing in their external wombs waiting for the right moment to arise and destroy mankind.


    Dammit! Now we'll have to kill you, Scott! icon_twisted.gificon_evil.gificon_wink.gificon_lol.gificon_smile.gificon_biggrin.gif
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    Jul 01, 2009 2:58 PM GMT
    Those are clumps of worms.
    deepseanews.com saidEnter stage right Dr. Timothy S. Wood who is an expert on freshwater bryozoa and an officer with the International Bryozoology Association. I sent along the video and this was his reponse…

    Dr. Timothy S. Wood saidThanks for the video – I had not see it before. No, these are not bryozoans! They are clumps of annelid worms, almost certainly tubificids (Naididae, probably genus Tubifex). Normally these occur in soil and sediment, especially at the bottom and edges of polluted streams. In the photo they have apparently entered a pipeline somehow, and in the absence of soil they are coiling around each other. The contractions you see are the result of a single worm contracting and then stimulating all the others to do the same almost simultaneously, so it looks like a single big muscle contracting. Interesting video.




    via Gizmodo
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    Jul 01, 2009 3:02 PM GMT
    well thanks for that...
    there went breakfast. icon_neutral.gif
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    Jul 01, 2009 3:10 PM GMT
    are you sure that isn't just your colonoscopy? icon_biggrin.gif
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jul 01, 2009 3:35 PM GMT
    Are you sure that wasn't some disease infested arse?!?!?!?!?! icon_eek.gif
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jul 01, 2009 3:39 PM GMT
    WTF?
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    Jul 01, 2009 3:43 PM GMT



    Oh good lord, we wondered where Aunt Pixie's wig got to!
  • Rookz

    Posts: 947

    Jul 01, 2009 3:57 PM GMT
    So, the sewers have hemorrhoids?

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  • coolarmydude

    Posts: 9190

    Jul 01, 2009 4:02 PM GMT
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    Jul 01, 2009 4:11 PM GMT

    Cool.. that's interesting .. I really have the urge to cut it and see what does it look like from the inside..

    Can I keep it ? can I can I ?
  • coolarmydude

    Posts: 9190

    Jul 01, 2009 4:15 PM GMT
    wral.com out of Raleigh just mentioned, seconds ago, that they will be reporting on it at 5PM.
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    Jul 01, 2009 6:39 PM GMT
    Noice. icon_biggrin.gif And how did they even think they were bryozoans? Bryozoans look more like very TINY bilaterally symmetrical crosses between a jellyfish and a brachiopod, certainly not the long strands of the animal in the video. And more so, most bryozoans form moss-like to coral-like colonies (most people actually mistake them for corals, as that is what their colonies will look like to the naked eye):

    Bryozoan-main.jpg

    And yes those look more like Tubifex worms. I've seen them sometimes on shallow sewage canals or slow moving streams with thin layers of sediments. They look like pink grass waving frantically in the water. And a very distinctive trait is the way they seem to move together when threatened, as if one worm somehow warns the others. When disturbed by even the slightest motion in the water they will all disappear at once into their burrows. Used to love throwing pebbles at them.

    tubifex.jpg

    Tubifex3.jpg

    Lebendfutter_Tubifex.jpg

    tubifex.jpg

    One moment you'll see what seems to be a gentle meadow of pink underwater grass, the next you'll see just mud.

    A behavior that is exhibited also in the video, probably in response to the air movement/light of the endoscope (I'm thinking they're using an endoscope). And since there is no sediment in that pipe, they're all clumped together in what niches they can find in the cracks. And they obviously can't hide. (also the fact that the water was drained from the pipe and they're exposed to the air makes them look more like a clump of wet noodles and less like how they would actually look like if they were submerged)

    They're quite common. Globally distributed in fact. And if you own an aquarium. Chances are you've held them before. ;) They're the main ingredient in fish pellets.

    And jeez. People, you remind me of the guys who caught a mola mola here and they were featured on national television. They were acting like it was some unknown deep sea creature never before seen by mankind. I want to scream every time they oohed and aaahed over it. LOL. It was just a mola mola FFS!

    Nature is fascinating and weird. And if you haven't been noticing it that much, it WILL seem alien to you. Wait till you hear about giant amoebas.

    (Grape sized single-celled oceanic creatures. Compare shrimp for size)
    20081126_gromia.jpg

    Or Assassin Spiders:

    060308_spider.jpg

    Or the Portuguese Man O'War which you've probably heard of before. But did you know it's not even a single animal? Like corals and the previously mentioned bryozoans, it's a floating colony of several animals, each contributing to the rest of the colony and acting as if it was a single animal. And the most interesting fact: they have 50 meters-long painful, venom-filled tentacles (and yes that's 50 METERS).

    3060002958_60c97cfa17.jpg

    Or the Magnapinna 'alien' squid caught on camera by a deep sea Shell Oil ROV:



    <3 nature
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    Jul 01, 2009 6:44 PM GMT
    that is weird, its at Cameron village too, I have friends that live there. Well to be honest i don't think its an alien.. but it is slightly disturbing still.

    Good thing my family is in north raleigh
  • DrobUA

    Posts: 1331

    Jul 01, 2009 6:44 PM GMT
    Thats what people get for eating hot pockets
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    Jul 01, 2009 6:48 PM GMT
    DrobUA saidThats what people get for eating hot pockets


    WIN
  • coolarmydude

    Posts: 9190

    Jul 01, 2009 9:34 PM GMT
    http://www.wral.com/news/local/story/5483707/

    Raleigh, N.C. — It's reminiscent of something from the 1958 science-fiction film, "The Blob" – a beating, pulsating, mysterious, slimy mass that has grabbed widespread attention across the Internet.

    And it's growing and living in the sewer below Cameron Village in Raleigh.

    A 2-minute video of the clusters, taken in April, was posted onto YouTube a few weeks ago and has quickly made its way onto other social networking Web sites. The broadcast industry publication TV Week ranked it Wednesday as the No. 1 viral video on the Web.

    Speculation on YouTube as to what it might be ranges from a marketing ploy to promote a new alien movie to undocumented life form to a sewer monster.

    But a sewer monster, it is not.

    The city of Raleigh says the video – of a 6-inch sanitary sewer line – was taken in April during an inspection of a privately maintained sewer line in Cameron Village.

    Ed Buchan, an environmental coordinator with the city's Public Utilities Department, says the mass is believed to be tubifex worms, which form clusters or colonies of about a half-inch to 1-inch in diameter.

    Also known as "sludge worms," they are normally found in sediment of ponds and are sold as fish food in both live and dried forms.

    Thomas Kwak, a biology professor at North Carolina State University's Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit, however, says the so-called monster is actually a cluster of invertebrates called byrozoan, which are commonly found in both the sea and fresh water environments.

    It's unclear how they got into the sewer system, but Kwak said it isn't surprising. The byrozoan feed off bacteria and thrive in cold, dark environments. Those in the video are smaller than a fist, but could grow as large as a watermelon, he said.

    "These organisms are completely harmless," Kwak said. "It's another interesting aspect of nature that we don’t' get to see every day."

    Buchan says that because the worm-like creatures don't pose a threat to the city's water quality, the city isn't requiring York Properties, which manages the system and Cameron Village, to remove them.

    York did not return calls seeking comment, and it's unclear if it plans to remove the colonies.
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    Jul 01, 2009 10:20 PM GMT
    coolarmydude said
    Thomas Kwak, a biology professor at North Carolina State University's Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit, however, says the so-called monster is actually a cluster of invertebrates called byrozoan, which are commonly found in both the sea and fresh water environments.


    These are freshwater bryozoans:

    Plumatella fungosa:

    P-fungosa2208078452.jpg

    Pectinatella magnifica

    pectinatella2.jpg

    Hyalinella punctata

    H-punctata1208077955.jpg

    Plumatella vaihiriae

    Armful2.jpg

    No resemblance at all. Not to mention that bryozoans move rather slowly, if at all. Out of the water, they wouldn't be able to move at all. And each individual animal in a bryozoan colony is TINY. The animals in the video are massive in comparison (it's not an endoscope btw).

    Those definitely are NOT bryozoans.
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    Jul 01, 2009 10:29 PM GMT
    im just waiting to read a response from any war veterans that say that it looks like something that fell off their dick in Vietnam...
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    Jul 01, 2009 10:31 PM GMT
    WTF?! ew...
  • jeepguySD

    Posts: 651

    Jul 01, 2009 10:37 PM GMT
    What is most disturbing to me is how some people go directly from "unkown" to "alien." There seems to be a tendency in some to think "I don't know what that is, so it must be extraterrestrial." Or, for others, one may simply replace "extraterrestrial" with "supernatural." Credulity is not a good thing.