Question for marathon runners

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jun 30, 2009 6:42 PM GMT
    I've just taken on marathon running recently, and am now working on qualifying for Boston. I ran competatively in college for two years, wasnt half bad (25:00 8K was my best race). Took about 5 years off, and started with half marathons. Have a PR of 85 min. First marathon I ever ran was in December, never ran more than 14 miles. Finished in 4:30, four months later with still little to no long runs, down to 4 hours. Based on my previous times and staying relatively injury free, I believe that I can qualify for Boston within 2 years. I am doing my 20 mile runs now, so I know that is the main component. I have some good workouts, but here is my question. For my workout "pace" should I assume a 3 hour marathon, 4 hour marathon, or somewhere in between. I hate to do 4 hour training, since I feel really good after races I have run, but I hate to do 3 hour training too early and hurt myself. Any advice?
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    Jul 23, 2009 3:19 AM GMT
    I'm by no means an expert but from my personal experience; I would train for a 4 hr time.

    Or you could try for a 3:45 goal. It's better to train more slowly and build up over the years, the 3 hr training pace is pretty intense without much experience.

    I'm running 5 marathons this year and always train slower then my race pace. Keeps my aging body injury free for 9 years and running.icon_cool.gif

    Welcome to the addictive world of marathons.

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    Jul 23, 2009 5:34 AM GMT
    Hmm yes, get your base mileage up...way up. Marathons concentrate pretty much soley on aerobic your aerobic system and with lots of base mileage it's like having money in the bank. When you go to pay your bills, you need to have the money in your account first. When you go to run a marathon, you need to have the mileage on your legs. Be careful when building base though, I'm sure you know not to increase by more than 10% per week because your musculoskeletal system needs to get used to more pounding gradually. Keep your mileage slow at 70-75% of your heart rate max...there are charts all over the internet. If you do not have a heart rate monitor you should buy one for accountability. Marathon training is hard on the body and it needs to be able to recover between runs.

    I personally think that if your PR 8k is 25:00, then if you get a few decent long runs in you'll qualify without too much of an issue barring a bad day. 7:10-7:15 which is what an 18-34 year old man needs to do to qualify for Boston will probably feel like plodding along once you're in shape.
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    Jul 28, 2009 4:54 AM GMT
    Definitely suggest that you build up your base slowly and do the long runs in a much slower pace than your race pace. I just ran San Francisco Marathon in a Boston-qualifying time for the first time. I did long runs 8+ minutes per mile and I finished the race averaging 7:37/mile.
  • jock_n_ca

    Posts: 148

    Jul 28, 2009 5:01 AM GMT
    Go to the Boston Marathon website and find your BQ time. Work from there. Runners World has all sorts of programs. NY Times also has many workouts to choose from in their "Well" blog. I ran Boston in April. Definitely worth it. Good luck!
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    Dec 07, 2009 1:35 AM GMT
    Hey, based on that half-marathon time (if it's recent) you should be in line to run a sub 3:10 marathon with the right training. That's a BQ time so I would go for it.

    Check out Greg McMillan's running calculator to approximate training and race times. It's a good resource. You plug in a recent race time (the longer and more recent the race, the better) and he provides you with recommended training pace and race time estimates:

    http://www.mcmillanrunning.com/mcmillanrunningcalculator.htm

    Also, Pete Pfitzinger's "Advanced Marathoning" is a fantastic book, probably the best out there by many accounts.

    The guys are right, however, in saying that you ought to build mileage slowly. But it sounds like you've already run a couple of marathons so you should be on your way. Good luck.

    Rob