should grains be apart of a healthy diet? or should fruit and veggies make up for them?

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    Jul 01, 2009 1:09 AM GMT
    Guys let me know whether you eat starchy carbs or not....... peace
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    Jul 01, 2009 4:51 AM GMT
    i got lean by cutting out processed carbs and processed sugar.They are just not natural foods that our body evolved with I eat meat, veggies, fruit nuts,berriesand plie on the fat. .
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    Jul 01, 2009 4:56 AM GMT
    rosenberger_m saidGuys let me know whether you eat starchy carbs or not....... peace


    You have your amino acids, and carbon chains, basically.

    I.e., protein, and everything else.

    That being said, you have various carbon chains are bonded at various "tightness" levels.

    Lipids (fats) are generally tightly bonded.
    MCT (Medium chains less tightly bonded.)
    Carbs and alcohol, less tightly bonded.

    So, depending on what your goal is, you vary your carbon chain intake accordingly.

    We are "carbon based units" to coin a Star Trek phrase.

    If you want longer lasting blood sugar effects you eat the more tightly (complex) bonded carbs. If you want faster blood sugar, and insulin, effects, you eat less tightly bonded carbs (sugar). If you want dense calories for times when blood sugar is low, you eat fats (lipids) and MCT.

    You need to determine your goal before anyone can give you a qualified answer.

    Many grains have some degree of fibers, particularly oats. Soluble fiber has a long list of health benefits.

    Carbs are NOT the enemy, but, to much to fast, and with saturated fat, KILLS PEOPLE.
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    Jul 01, 2009 5:05 AM GMT
    Alpha13 saidi got lean by cutting out processed carbs and processed sugar.They are just not natural foods that our body evolved with I eat meat, veggies, fruit nuts,berriesand plie on the fat. .


    "Fast carbs" are not bad. It's the insulin response, at the wrong times, that makes for a fat person. In fact, fast carbs (sugars) are a GOOD idea post workout for glycogen reload in the golden hour post workout.

    It has EVERYTHING to do with insulin management. Bodybuilders learn how to keep their blood sugar moderately high with adequate amino acids (protein), with nice, stable, insulin levels, creating an anabolic, as opposed to catabolic state. It's not about miracle potions as many folks who fail would like to believe.

    Fat asses get diabetic because they become insensitive to insulin (type 2 diabetes). They do that by keeping their blood sugar to high, and having too much insulin to much of the time.

    All that sugar, and lipids, mct, and alcohol (the carbon) eventually end up as something close or exactly like glucose (blood sugar). Proteins repair the tissue.

    Now, any scientist can tell you this is a bit simplified, but, it's the basics. You have carbon, and amino acids. We're carbon-based.

    All that being said, real food has many benefits.

    Starch (complex carbs) give you sustained glucose and sustained insulin levels in that they are tightly bonded and decay more slowly than sugars, causing fewer insulin spikes, but, may not be fast enough.

    Our body will metabolize fat under the right conditions, BUT....not if our bodies are in famine mode. In famine mode, we metabolize PROTEINS (muscle) and carbs, and preserve our fat, as well as slow our metabolism.

    Adequate calories are VERY important to maintaing a fast metabolic rate.

    ONLY lean muscle mass INCREASES your base metabolism as you GROW OLDER. It burns calories sitting there.
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    Jul 01, 2009 5:09 AM GMT
    To stay lean, it's best to increase your lean muscle mass; eat small meals often with your biggest meals early in the day (you're breaking the fast); do HIIT; do simple sugars before and after strenuous anaerobic work; avoid saturated fats; eat complex carbs the rest of the time for nice, stable, blood sugar levels, and make sure you have poly and mono unsaturated fats for satiation and good brain function.

    If you're looking to gain muscle you need fluid, carbs, protein, rest, stimulation, and recovery.

    If you're looking to get lean, eat a bit less carbs, but, keep your protein and overall calories UP to sustain a high activity level.

    Yes, I said UP. That means more protein AND more fat, to prevent metabolic lag, and to let your body know you aren't starving, but that you'd like it to burn fat (run at a lower blood sugar level, and lower insulin level.)

    If you garner an understanding of how these processes work, you'll be successful.
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    Jul 01, 2009 5:12 AM GMT
    You better believe Lance Armstrong has eaten a SHITPILE of spaghetti.

    Enough said.
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    Jul 01, 2009 12:00 PM GMT
    The new USDA Food Pyramid recommends whole grains for balanced and adequate nutrition.
    Refined grains are to be are to be consumed less. White bread, white rice, and pasta are made from refined grains. Potatoes are included in this class. The amount of information on the Net is overwhelming and many times conflicting and controversial. I follow the recommendations of the new USDA Food Pyramid.

    The Paleolithic Diet(Caveman diet) recommends against grains, beans and potatoes.
    http://www.earth360.com/diet_paleodiet_balzer.html

    The American Parkour Diet also recommends replacing grains with vegetables.
    http://www.americanparkour.com/content/view/455/323/

    I don't know which diet is the best.icon_confused.gif


    pyramid_lg.gif
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    Jul 01, 2009 1:21 PM GMT
    its weird , i threw them out for about 2 months and noticed i felt a lot better and looked extremely lean, but i started eating things like oat meal and whole grain cereals again and i can tell a difference and that all it does is make you want more of them
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    Jul 01, 2009 6:16 PM GMT
    Right.

    It's called "fueling the furnace." Your metabolism comes UP and everything kicks into overdrive.

    Once you get the flame stoked, it burns more brightly.

    The saying goes: the more you eat the more you can train. The more you can train, the more you can eat.

    You feel your body coming up to speed.

    With that speedier metabolism that comes from eating, you can train harder, grow more, recover faster, and feel better.

    It's a common sense thing. If you want the engine (the human machine) to go fast and have power, it has to have fuel.

    When you eat, you feel like eating more because your body senses that the famine (under nourishment) is over.

    The famine response, when you don't eat enough, curbs your metabolism, cravings, and the like, and you perform at a much lower level.

    Eating is the key, and you've felt what it's like for your metabolism to pick up and your body to go into growth mode.
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    Jul 04, 2009 6:21 AM GMT
    My thought is that you might want to check the sugar content on the grains you do eat. Things such as bread, whole grain or not can have hidden sugar that adds up throughout the course of the day.

    If I don't get my complex carbs, I just don't feel right on my runs.
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    Jul 04, 2009 8:49 AM GMT
    In my factless opinion, I'd only eat starchy carbs after a workout.