Depression, Doc

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    Jul 01, 2009 3:50 PM GMT
    Ok, I've been depressed for a while. A family member pushed me to see a doctor. Doctor prescribed lexapro after a consult. On it for the first day, is it suppose to make you feel more depressed. Doc, said it would take four weeks to feel positive affects. Hell feeling more down/suicidal (now) today than yesterday. Anybody know if that is normal with this drug?

    Afraid I might lose any slight control I had without drug.

    Am i just being a drama queen, i don't know, I'm just feeling physically strange since taking first dose.

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    Jul 01, 2009 4:08 PM GMT
    I had the same experience on a different SSRI.

    What your doctor should have told you is that medication alone is not nearly as effective as medication coupled with counseling.

    But, if you are feeling suicidal and you feel like you have less control. Call 1-800-784-2433 and talk to someone.
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    Jul 01, 2009 4:18 PM GMT



    Yes, from the volunteer work training, this is quite normal. Call the doc, ask for counseling, call the number MunchingZombie provided and stay online here and talk with all of us. LOL! Lots to do - keeping busy is good!

    hang in!

    -Doug of meninlove

    PS and not to worry, if you can; remind yourself that these are just feelings saying, "look at me! Look at me!" which they tend to do (feelings always clamour for your attention)
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    Jul 01, 2009 10:55 PM GMT


    Dude sorry to hear your spirits are low, not sure on how that drug will effect you, but sometimes when I'm in a similar mood I run and get runners high almost like a kind of euphoria and it puts me in a different mind set. It might not wrk for you both it's worth a try. Keep your head up things will turn around...

    Hillie
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    Jul 01, 2009 11:07 PM GMT
    I was on Lexapro for several years. It was great!!! It does take several weeks to take full effect. Hang in there.

    I eventually felt better and my cognitive functioning was greatly improved. I couldnt read enough books and starting taking adult ed classes for home owners....classes in plumbing, electricity, dry walling, framing, masonry, and woodworking.

    A cheaper version of Lexapro is Celexa. Celexa is one chemical reaction before Lexapro. Celexa is converted into Lexapro in the body. Since the pharmaceutical company doesnt have to do the chemical process, celexa is cheaper. But you have to take twice the dosage of celexa than Lexapro.

    In addition to your Lexapro, keep in mind that exercise and sunlight are great deterrents to depression.

    Check out.... What foods are best for reducing depression?

    Allergies to gluten and casein can really tear you up inside and drag the mind down with it...

    A good book on how diet and internal inflammation can influence your mental health is:

    ultramind_solution.jpg

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    Jul 02, 2009 3:20 AM GMT
    Hector, it's important to let your doctor know how you're feeling. It will take a few weeks to see maximum gain, but your doc needs to know asap if you feel worse. Suicidal thoughts can be a side effect of many of these SSRI drugs in folks your age.

    I was diagnosed with depression about five years ago, and have been prescribed three drugs since then. While Zoloft and Cymbalta work well for me, Lexapro didn't. I tapered off of it after just a week. It might take trying a few drugs to find the right one for you. That's why it's so important to communicate with your doctor. But don't give up! The journey is very worth it when you find the one that works :-)
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    Jul 02, 2009 3:32 AM GMT
    these feelings are quite normal when you first start taking anti-depressants especially if its the first time you've ever taken them, the effects can be startling and make you wonder if its you or the drugs.

    As MunchingZombie said, medication and counseling are the most effective, also if you aren't already, light active exercise daily will be helpful to most people (if you aren't already)

    Medication is only so helpful and even counseling is only helpful to a certain extent, it takes a lot of effort to pull your self out of depression, trying to work actively towards being happy and healthy again is the main thing.

    if you've pulled away from people or activities you used to enjoy, try getting back in touch and doing them again, in small doses, you might not enjoy it, but, its more the doing things that are positive towards you and your health.

    getting back to a healthy happy you is a slow walk there, it can take months or more before you feeling your old self again, but, its normal and every day you work towards it, you eventually start feeling better for it.
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    Jul 02, 2009 3:43 AM GMT
    hector2009 saidOk, I've been depressed for a while. A family member pushed me to see a doctor. Doctor prescribed lexapro after a consult. On it for the first day, is it suppose to make you feel more depressed. Doc, said it would take four weeks to feel positive affects. Hell feeling more down/suicidal (now) today than yesterday. Anybody know if that is normal with this drug?

    Afraid I might lose any slight control I had without drug.

    Am i just being a drama queen, i don't know, I'm just feeling physically strange since taking first dose.



    Did a psychiatrist prescribe the drug?

    What dose are you taking? Did the dr. prescribe that you start with one dose and increase to another? Are you having other side effects?

    Is anxiety part of your depression?

    Actually, Lexapro tends to work faster than the usual SSRIs, so it may not take four weeks for you to feel a positive effect.

    If you are feeling suicidal, though, it is important you talk to someone in the mental health field.
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    Jul 02, 2009 4:13 AM GMT
    Been on Lexapro for 3 years now.

    For me, it did not really start to kick in until the 4th week - but around week 2, I felt the fog lifting a bit - my therapist referred to it as "The Cavalry's Coming!"

    Hang in there, you could be feeling a bit blue over the need to take meds - I know for me, it was a fight to get to the point where I'd I'd take them, and somehow I considered myself "weak" because I'd decided to enjoy better living through chemistry.

    I'm not going to post my own experiences with the sexual side effects in a public forum, only to say they were mild and resolved. If you want more details feel free to email me.
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    Jul 02, 2009 4:36 AM GMT

    Sorry you're going through this. Depression is a miserable and downright dangerous disease. And two of its crueler aspects are that most of the medicines that can treat it have unpleasant side effects, which tend to show up soon after you start taking the meds, while the therapeutic effect of the drug can take weeks to show itself. On top of that, there is no reliable way for even the best psycho-pharmacologist to know which drug will work for which patient. There is unfortunately a good deal of trial and error involved in drug treatment of mood disorders. That's one of the reasons why, if you can, you should seek treatment from a psychiatrist who specializes in treating depression with drugs.

    As for the increase in suicidal thinking you seem to be experiencing: this is a known risk of many anti-depressants, you should definitely report it asap to your doctor. If you believe you are at risk of harming yourself, or you start to plan how, when or where you would kill yourself, go to your nearest emergency room or call for an ambulance.

    I sometimes think of anti-depressants as scaffolding we can stand on while we give lifestyle changes and therapy a chance to start helping. If you are not already working with a therapist, I would suggest you give it serious thought. Your doctor may be able to recommend a couple. Sometimes you need to meet with a few therapists before you find one you think you will be comfortable working with. One mode of therapy that has been proven to be very effective for many people with depression and/or anxiety is Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT), which teaches that thoughts, feelings and behavior all affect each other and that by challenging the way we think about situations and people, etc, we can often change our feelings and or behaviors.

    While you are seeking out a therapist and a medicine (or medicines) that help, you should try to eat well. If you have little appetite try small meals or protein shakes. Also, try to stick to a set bedtime and set time to wake up each day. Moderate aerobic exercise helps many peoples' mood. Even though you may find it hard to enjoy anything right now, try to participate every day in at least one activity that you usually find enjoyable. Finally, try to resist the urge that many people struggling with depression feel to isolate themselves. Do your best to stay in touch with friends and/or family - especially with people you can talk to about how you're feeling.

    Depending on where you live you may find a chapter of the Depression Bipolar Support Alliance (DBSA) near you. Many people find their support meetings very helpful. You can get more information about the organizaton and about depression at their website: www.dbsalliance.org
  • tokugawa

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    Jul 02, 2009 3:08 PM GMT
    Even though your doctor told you it might take 4 weeks for the positive effects to kick in, some people feel that the effects should start immediately, and then feel let down when that does not happen. If you can make it to week 4, there is a much better chance for significant improvement.

    Many people get depressed at some point in their life. It may be because of a recent loss such as a family member, a friend, or a life partner. It may be more insidious, such as repressed memories of abuse during childhood coming to the surface. For the large majority of depressed people, they recover from their depression. Some people recover without medicine or therapy, and just the passage of time heals them. You already have an advantage over them, you saw a doctor and started on an antidepressant.
    There is an excellent chance you will recover completely.

    Your courage in posting here indicates you truly want to get better. Keep posting!