This is a dilly of a pickle (a hypothetical scenario)...

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    Nov 22, 2007 12:52 AM GMT
    What should a very angry and nihilistic person who is extremely hostile, aggressive, isolated, alienated, lacks empathy, cannot percieve a future, completely anhedonic, vindictive, ruminative, desperate, paranoid, impoverished, vacillating, impulsive, and righteously indignant; supposed to look forward to, and try to cultivate in order to keep themselves from lashing out and doing something stupid, destructive; and dare I say- psychopathic? Even if they have perfect insight into the hows and whys of the problem, and are otherwise completely innocent?

    I know what Nietzsche, and Rumi, Hesse, Durkheim, Schopenhauer, Marcus Aurelius, and even the great Thich Nhat Han would say, but what do the average euthymic (or even dysthymic, and cyclothymic) socially integrated people out there have to advise those anomic few who suffer from the "soul sickness"? What do those who take basic human pleasure, compassion, and fundamental respect towards all life; for granted, have to say?icon_confused.gif

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    Out of the eye of your judges glanceth the executioner and his steal. I know I'm spinning my wheels with this fucking book, I cant stop reading it. The pages are falling out. The binding is cracked. That motherfucker saw his goal; and described it but could never attain it, but he did create something beyond himself. All creative vision. No will for anything beyond its expression. Then he went nuts and died. I do agree with him on pity. Pity won't stop anything. It doesn't stop impulses or obsessions. I never had any pity. I think I see its hypothetical function: It is a crude form of compassion.
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    Nov 22, 2007 4:44 PM GMT
    That certainly is a dilly of a pickle. It saddens me to see this topic simply ignored, but I have no idea how to respond to it in a manner that will be meaningful to you. All I can do is see how it relates to my own life, and probably the closest I've come to that situation is the four month Dark Night of the Soul I endured two years ago. The relative world turned to ashes, and I free fell into void, kicking and screaming, until ego surrendered. These days, stress and discomfort over how the I/me story shows up varies. Right now, I'm in a neutral, nihilistic state of mind. My life and this existence is utterly absurd and inherently meaningless, but I'm completely fine with that. It's the ever-changing, temporal playground of duality, where there's nothing ever to hold on to. There is only right now, and it is what it is.

    For me, dissociating from the I/me story and being able to witness it as just another object in the awareness has been an incredibly useful tool for doing inner work and becoming more comfortable being the I/me story. But, I'm not so sure that such a dissociative state would be a good thing for someone with mental health issues.

    The bottom line is that I wanted there to be a response here, but I think this query would be best directed toward a mental health professional.
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    Oct 05, 2008 2:54 AM GMT
    My off-the-top-of-the-head reaction is to look for some more positive adjectives for a your self-concept.

    I am one of those unscientific dolts that thinks the ideas you generate and reflect on to characterize yourself are extremely important to how you experience this unpredictable mind-body paradox.
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    Oct 05, 2008 5:26 AM GMT
    OK, I lost track of the whole issue here. I'm not TOTALLY dense I hope, just maybe half-dense, but a bit of plain English would be helpful to understanding the basic problem here. Maybe a concise summary without the rambling rhetoric?
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    Oct 05, 2008 11:01 AM GMT
    Yeah. I hope he's seeing a psychotherapist or something. I have never been nihilist or lacking in empathy. Even in my darkest depression or in blind rage there is always that small niggling conscience that seeks not to aggravate the problem by hurting more people. I have always viewed this characteristic as a fundamental human attribute. icon_confused.gif

    So there are people who are really like this?

    My experiences with antisocial, nihilists are that most of them are faking it. You would still see it in their eyes that they're fighting themselves whenever they do something supposedly according to their beliefs.

    Too bad the post is a year old. icon_sad.gif I wanted to ask if it is somehow related to narcissism? Psychopathy seems to be so self-centered. Lack of empathy, megalomania, remorselessness, impulsiveness/can't control the need for gratification, etc.

    My advice would be to always think of yourself in another's shoes before attempting any interaction that might hurt them. icon_neutral.gif