India legalizes homosexuality (same-sex activities)

  • NickoftheNort...

    Posts: 1416

    Jul 02, 2009 8:09 AM GMT
    According to the Indian Express, the Delhi High Court has today "legalised gay sex among consenting adults holding that the law making it a criminal offence violates fundamental rights."

    From the forum where I got the info, some members are discussing whether India's legalization will help set a standard for legalization in so-called Third world countries. It surely won't hurt to have the second-most populated country in the world on our (at least legally, if not culturally).
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    Jul 02, 2009 1:24 PM GMT
    This is fantastic news - and tribute to brave men and women campaigning for their rights in India.

    .... next stop Jamaica and Iran.
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    Jul 02, 2009 9:34 PM GMT
    Kudos to India's High Court!
  • zakariahzol

    Posts: 2241

    Jul 02, 2009 9:56 PM GMT
    I dont know if that true or not. But dont keep your hope high. This is usually what happen. Some lawmaker try to admend certain law and then a bunch of religion guys will start protesting, making a lot of noise , calling the masses to oppose this things and we are back to square one.

    Homosexuality will never be accepted in my country , that for sure. Not in my lifetimes anyway.
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    Jul 03, 2009 1:44 AM GMT


    This is Doug. I belong to a newsletter group for Sikhism...I joined because of the attitudes of Sikhs I know that welcomed Bill and I in the midst of previous struggles, and gave us kind support.

    I am not Sikh, but christian - it didn't matter to them.

    Here:


    This weeks newsletter highlights an important developments concerning Sikh Diaspora. I would like to invite you to share your views on these long burning issues afresh.

    Featured Topics

    Delhi High Decriminalizes Homosexuality

    In a landmark judgement, the capital's highest court has struck down an archaic provision of the Indian Penal Code (IPC) which criminalises homosexuality. It has ruled that Section 377, in so far as it penalises gay sex between consenting adults, was in violation of fundamental rights. In effect, this means that gays, lesbians, bisexuals and transgenders cannot be hauled up anymore in the capital if they are adults, and engage in consensual sex. This is a welcome step forward. The criminalisation of homosexuality is a relic of the past, introduced by the British in 1861. By legalising homosexuality, the Delhi high court has restored the personal freedom and rights of homosexuals, guaranteed to them by the Indian Constitution.

    Over the past few days, there has been a renewed debate over Sec 377. When law minister Veerappa Moily recently suggested that Sec 377 could be one of the many outdated laws that needed review, critics and advocates of this law were galvanised. The government was exhorted to give the anachronistic law a burial and usher in an era of greater individual rights. We have repeatedly urged the government in these columns to stop governing our personal lives, and that includes matters of sexual choice.

    However, critics of homosexuality - some religious heads as well as self-appointed advocates of 'Indian culture' - kicked up a fuss...


    Gurfateh,


    Aman Singh
    Sikh Philosophy Network
  • HndsmKansan

    Posts: 16311

    Jul 03, 2009 1:52 AM GMT
    I'm amazed, but glad to hear it.
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    Jul 03, 2009 1:55 AM GMT
    All of India? I thought the ruling only covered a limited jurisdiction within the area of Delhi itself.
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    Jul 03, 2009 3:32 AM GMT
    Red_Vespa saidAll of India? I thought the ruling only covered a limited jurisdiction within the area of Delhi itself.


    If the government challenges the court's decision the highest court will likely not overturn the decision, I hear. Or, the government can pass legislation to avoid further law suits that would legalize it across the nation.

    So, right now it is legal in a certain region, but it is expected to soon be legal nationwide. Which, is awesometastic!