Acne?!?!?!

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jul 03, 2009 4:35 AM GMT
    So, I have 'stepped up' my A-Game regarding lifting weights at the gym. I'm pushing myself more and also biking with a lot of resistance.

    I am starting to see the results of getting lean and tone however I am now seeing Acne with a capital-A.

    Has this been covered yet? Connection between hormones, exercise, and acne???

    I'm 28 and want the madness of acne out of my life!!!!! Ahh.


    JOE
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    Jul 03, 2009 5:38 AM GMT
    When I was younger, I took vitamin A capsules to control my acne. They worked quite well. It took way more vitamin A to help my skin than the recommended daily dosage in a multi-vitamin pill.

    I have noticed that now that I am older and dont have acne per se, my skin is much better since I have bee drinking a combination of orange and carrot juice, that I juice myself. (3 oranges and 3 medium carrots a day)

    Also, remember exercise is the stimulus for muscle growth, but nutrition provides the building blocks to make that body. If you are working out then you are putting extra demand on your body for nutrition, so be sure you are eating better. Brocolli, Brussel sprouts,, Romaine lettuce, and Spinach are virtual vitamin pills in plant form.

    My basic advice would be increase your vitamin A intake, eat well to improve your immune system, wash your skin well, and wipe it down with rubbing alcohol.

    And wash your skin as soon after working out as possible so the pores dont close with the bacteria growing inside. Sweating, especially in a sauna or steamroom, flushes the pores and produces a powerful antibacterial agent called dermcidin.


    Here's an article from The World's Healthiest Foods (www.whfoods.com)

    Are there any foods that can help prevent acne?

    Acne is a condition that affects the majority of adolescents in Western societies. While some people find that their skin problems resolve as they enter into adulthood, acne still continues to affect many: 40% to 54% of those over 25 are estimated to have facial acne to some extent, with it continuing into middle age for an estimated 12% of women and 3% of men. So, if you have acne, regardless of your age, you are not alone.

    Acne is a problem that most research suggests to be hormonally related. Shifts in one particular family of hormones, the androgen family, seem especially important in the development of acne.

    There are no foods that cause acne and, unfortunately, no foods that can cure it. For a long time, researchers claimed that there was no link whatsoever between diet and acne, yet recent studies lend some support that there may be a potential connection.

    For example, many healthcare practitioners have suggested avoidance of dairy products when acne is present, yet it was only recently that a study's results finally lent support to this practice. In this study, researchers evaluated teenage diet and acne diagnosis in tens of thousands of women in the Nurse's Study II and found an association between intake of milk (both total milk and skim milk consumption) and acne. The researchers suggested that the presence of hormones and other bioactive molecules in the milk could be the reason that milk consumption was found to related to acne development. If this is true, this may be another reason for those who consume dairy products to choose certified organic dairy products from organically raised cows, since they are not given hormone drugs.

    Very high doses of vitamin A are sometimes used in the treatment of acne, but these doses would be impossible to achieve through food under any circumstance. Yet, dietary vitamin A, as well as vitamin E, are important to skin health. In a recent study, the lower the levels of plasma vitamin A and vitamin E (reflective of many factors, including dietary intake), the more severe was the acne condition. While further research will hopefully shine more light on this subject, it does suggest that there may be an interrelationship between ensuring that you get adequate amounts of these fat-soluble vitamins in your diet and skin health.

    The skin needs good hydration, ample B vitamins, plenty of vitamin E, and the support of essential fatty acids - especially omega 3 fatty acids - to stay healthy. You can use the Essential Nutrients section (http://www.whfoods.com/nutrientstoc.php) of our website to look up any of the nutrients above and find the good, very good, and excellent food sources of these nutrients. You can also use our Recipe Assistant (located on our recipe page at http://www.whfoods.com/recipestoc.php#recipes) to find recipes that are high in the above nutrients.

    Another fascinating new area connecting diet to acne involves excess consumption of refined carbohydrates. We already know that too many processed carbs can lead to insulin-regulating problems and overproduction of insulin-like growth factor (IGF-1). What we've recently learned is that too much IGF-1 can also cause production of too many keratinocytes. Since overproduction of this skin cell type is one factor clearly associated with the risk of acne, there may be an important connection here - and one more reason to watch your processed carbs. Again, skin health may not just be related to dietary factors, but they may play a role. Other things that can positively affect skin health include good circulation (again, another reason to support the importance of exercise) and routine cleansing. Additionally, keeping stress to a minimum may also be important since research has suggested that acne severity may be exacerbated during times of high stress.

    References

    Adebamowo CA, Spiegelman D, Danby FW, Frazier AL, Willett WC, Holmes MD. High school dietary dairy intake and teenage acne. J Am Acad Dermatol. 2005 Feb;52(2):207-14.

    Chiu A, Chon SY, Kimball AB. The response of skin disease to stress: changes in the severity of acne vulgaris as affected by examination stress. Arch Dermatol. 2003 Jul;139(7):897-900.

    Cordain L, Lindeberg S, Hurtado M, Hill K, Eaton SB, Brand-Miller J. Acne vulgaris: a disease of Western civilization. Arch Dermatol. 2002 Dec;138(12):1584-90.

    El-Akawi Z, Abdel-Latif N, Abdul-Razzak K. Does the plasma level of vitamins A and E affect acne condition? Clin Exp Dermatol. 2006 May;31(3):430-4.

    Shen, S., E. Wertheimer, S. R. Sampson, and T. Tennenbaum. "Characterization of Glucose Transport System in Keratinocytes: Insulin and IGF-1 Differentially Affect Specific Transporters." J Invest Dermatol 115, no. 6 (2000): 949-54.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jul 03, 2009 5:50 AM GMT
    I think I had the same problem as you, Joe. Fall semester last year my face was fine but then I got more serious in the weight room. That's about when I noticed my acne becoming a problem as well.

    I'm going out first thing tomorrow to by those vitamin A and E supplements, hope they're the answer I've been searching for. Really needed a way to get this acne under control.

    Thanks for the info!
  • wannabeswiss

    Posts: 4

    Jul 03, 2009 8:06 AM GMT
    Hey there! I have always had problems with a mild form of acne and in my case was related to bad habits during my training routine.
    Every time I feel sweaty I would rub my face either with my forearm or make use of the disposable paper towels available at the gym. Also the use of hats/caps and ear phones, that are not cleaned with a certain frequency, can spread bacteria and may aggravate the problem if you have a predisposition to it.
    Not long ago I went to local my GP and he gave me a cream named Duac, to be used twice daily. My acne was much better after few days and now i only have a few subtile dark marks near my eyebrows, result of sun exposure..
    There are ways and ways to treat it, but you have to refer to a doctor before following one's advice.
    :-)
    Jules
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jul 03, 2009 8:23 AM GMT
    Caslon11000 saidWhen I was younger, I took vitamin A capsules to control my acne. They worked quite well. It took way more vitamin A to help my skin than the recommended daily dosage in a multi-vitamin pill.

    I have noticed that now that I am older and dont have acne per se, my skin is much better since I have bee drinking a combination of orange and carrot juice, that I juice myself. (3 oranges and 3 medium carrots a day)

    Also, remember exercise is the stimulus for muscle growth, but nutrition provides the building blocks to make that body. If you are working out then you are putting extra demand on your body for nutrition, so be sure you are eating better. Brocolli, Brussel sprouts,, Romaine lettuce, and Spinach are virtual vitamin pills in plant form.

    My basic advice would be increase your vitamin A intake, eat well to improve your immune system, wash your skin well, and wipe it down with rubbing alcohol.

    And wash your skin as soon after working out as possible so the pores dont close with the bacteria growing inside. Sweating, especially in a sauna or steamroom, flushes the pores and produces a powerful antibacterial agent called dermcidin.


    Here's an article from The World's Healthiest Foods (www.whfoods.com)

    Are there any foods that can help prevent acne?

    Acne is a condition that affects the majority of adolescents in Western societies. While some people find that their skin problems resolve as they enter into adulthood, acne still continues to affect many: 40% to 54% of those over 25 are estimated to have facial acne to some extent, with it continuing into middle age for an estimated 12% of women and 3% of men. So, if you have acne, regardless of your age, you are not alone.

    Acne is a problem that most research suggests to be hormonally related. Shifts in one particular family of hormones, the androgen family, seem especially important in the development of acne.

    There are no foods that cause acne and, unfortunately, no foods that can cure it. For a long time, researchers claimed that there was no link whatsoever between diet and acne, yet recent studies lend some support that there may be a potential connection.

    For example, many healthcare practitioners have suggested avoidance of dairy products when acne is present, yet it was only recently that a study's results finally lent support to this practice. In this study, researchers evaluated teenage diet and acne diagnosis in tens of thousands of women in the Nurse's Study II and found an association between intake of milk (both total milk and skim milk consumption) and acne. The researchers suggested that the presence of hormones and other bioactive molecules in the milk could be the reason that milk consumption was found to related to acne development. If this is true, this may be another reason for those who consume dairy products to choose certified organic dairy products from organically raised cows, since they are not given hormone drugs.

    Very high doses of vitamin A are sometimes used in the treatment of acne, but these doses would be impossible to achieve through food under any circumstance. Yet, dietary vitamin A, as well as vitamin E, are important to skin health. In a recent study, the lower the levels of plasma vitamin A and vitamin E (reflective of many factors, including dietary intake), the more severe was the acne condition. While further research will hopefully shine more light on this subject, it does suggest that there may be an interrelationship between ensuring that you get adequate amounts of these fat-soluble vitamins in your diet and skin health.

    The skin needs good hydration, ample B vitamins, plenty of vitamin E, and the support of essential fatty acids - especially omega 3 fatty acids - to stay healthy. You can use the Essential Nutrients section (http://www.whfoods.com/nutrientstoc.php) of our website to look up any of the nutrients above and find the good, very good, and excellent food sources of these nutrients. You can also use our Recipe Assistant (located on our recipe page at http://www.whfoods.com/recipestoc.php#recipes) to find recipes that are high in the above nutrients.

    Another fascinating new area connecting diet to acne involves excess consumption of refined carbohydrates. We already know that too many processed carbs can lead to insulin-regulating problems and overproduction of insulin-like growth factor (IGF-1). What we've recently learned is that too much IGF-1 can also cause production of too many keratinocytes. Since overproduction of this skin cell type is one factor clearly associated with the risk of acne, there may be an important connection here - and one more reason to watch your processed carbs. Again, skin health may not just be related to dietary factors, but they may play a role. Other things that can positively affect skin health include good circulation (again, another reason to support the importance of exercise) and routine cleansing. Additionally, keeping stress to a minimum may also be important since research has suggested that acne severity may be exacerbated during times of high stress.

    References

    Adebamowo CA, Spiegelman D, Danby FW, Frazier AL, Willett WC, Holmes MD. High school dietary dairy intake and teenage acne. J Am Acad Dermatol. 2005 Feb;52(2):207-14.

    Chiu A, Chon SY, Kimball AB. The response of skin disease to stress: changes in the severity of acne vulgaris as affected by examination stress. Arch Dermatol. 2003 Jul;139(7):897-900.

    Cordain L, Lindeberg S, Hurtado M, Hill K, Eaton SB, Brand-Miller J. Acne vulgaris: a disease of Western civilization. Arch Dermatol. 2002 Dec;138(12):1584-90.

    El-Akawi Z, Abdel-Latif N, Abdul-Razzak K. Does the plasma level of vitamins A and E affect acne condition? Clin Exp Dermatol. 2006 May;31(3):430-4.

    Shen, S., E. Wertheimer, S. R. Sampson, and T. Tennenbaum. "Characterization of Glucose Transport System in Keratinocytes: Insulin and IGF-1 Differentially Affect Specific Transporters." J Invest Dermatol 115, no. 6 (2000): 949-54.
    Wow, thanks Caslon icon_smile.gif

    you really put a lot into your replies icon_wink.gif
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    Jul 03, 2009 8:48 AM GMT
    joecoolnv saidSo, I have 'stepped up' my A-Game regarding lifting weights at the gym. I'm pushing myself more and also biking with a lot of resistance.

    I am starting to see the results of getting lean and tone however I am now seeing Acne with a capital-A.

    Has this been covered yet? Connection between hormones, exercise, and acne???

    I'm 28 and want the madness of acne out of my life!!!!! Ahh.


    JOE

    I think the general rules apply..

    - Don't touch your face if your hands and/or face are dirty.

    - Stay hydrated during your workouts. Sweating helps flush out the dirt/oil from your pores.

    - Wash your face with a mild soap and warm water right after you're done with your workouts or bike rides.

    - Avoid using any over the counter acne medication. Sometimes they dry your skin out too much and make the acne worse.

    - Cut back on caffeine. Maybe it's just me, but I tend to break out if I have too much coffee during the day.

    - Moderate exposure to sunlight is good for your skin. I'm sure you get some sun when you ride. So this won't be a problem for you.
    .

    If the acne gets worse, to the point where the zits are swollen and painful, you should see a dermatologist.
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    Jul 03, 2009 8:50 AM GMT
    Caslon11000 saidWhen I was younger, I took vitamin A capsules to control my acne. They worked quite well. It took way more vitamin A to help my skin than the recommended daily dosage in a multi-vitamin pill.

    Please note that because they are fat-soluble vitamins, too much of vitamins A, D, E, and K can kill you. When you get vitamin A supplements, make sure the majority comes from beta-carotene as your body will store this until it needs it (which is why if you eat enough carrots, you can turn orange). If you check out the Vitamin article http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fat_soluble_vitamins#In_humans on Wikipedia, it shows you the recommended daily dosage as well as the upper limit. The upper limit is significantly higher than the recommended daily dosage, especially for vitamin E, so you should be fine, just don't overdo it.
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    Jul 03, 2009 11:37 AM GMT
    Thanks for the replies.

    I have been going in the dry sauna a lot lately. So, maybe it is the toxins etc. coming out of my pores, then getting clogged.

    Hmmm.

    When I was younger I tried Accutane (Vitamin A Mega Dose). The pharm. drug caused my triglicerides to sky-rocket; I had chest pains and mental aggravation. The dermatologist took me off the drug and since then there have been Class-Action Law Suits regarding Accutane.

    I'm going to try to keep my face more clean and perhaps use a sweat band around my forehead...


    JOE
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    Jul 03, 2009 12:30 PM GMT
    ahh i know what your talking about. Heres my remedy that my mom taught me. its called "aloe vera".. it has amazing benefits and i have been using it since the age of 13. It purifies the blood and works wonders for the skin. It work from the inside so you have to ingest it which is the bad part as it tastes horrible. It comes in the pill, liquid and if your real hardcore..you will buy the plant and peel it, slice up the meaty part that looks like a gell and mix it with either orange or apple juice and drink. It can also be used as a facial mask. Because of it i have no blemishes on my body and i rarely have any pimples.
  • dantoujours

    Posts: 378

    Jul 03, 2009 12:43 PM GMT
    I would second the warning about Vitamin A intake. You really don't want to overdose on it. And long term overuse can lead to osteoporosis or liver failure.
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    Jul 03, 2009 12:56 PM GMT
    Treating adult acne is tricky. Most acne medications are geared to teens' oily skin, a bad choice for drier adult skin. From my own experience I know this is true.

    The above was from an article on WebMD.
    http://www.webmd.com/skin-problems-and-treatments/acne/features/adult-acne-why-you-get-it-how-fight-it

    Mental stress adversely affects acne. Stress is considered one of the main culprits for adult acne. Experts are divided on whether stress creates acne or just worsens it, but it does increase the amount of oil your skin secretes, which can clog pores and cause breakouts.

    Adults also can get an acne like skin rash called rosacea. Rosacea is a common problem. The prescription topical Metro-Gel works well for this problem.

    http://www.webmd.com/skin-problems-and-treatments/tc/rosacea-topic-overview

    How exercise affects acne is a hotly debated topic.
    http://ezinearticles.com/?How-Exercise-Affects-Acne&id=466603

    Anabolic steroids can be associated with acne.
    http://grg51.typepad.com/steroid_nation/2008/08/the-lancet-repo.html
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    Jul 03, 2009 1:16 PM GMT
    the increase in working out is spiking hormones and increasing sweat and sebum production by the skin, probably compounded by you touching your face and introducing bacteria to it, as in wiping sweat from your brow at the gym with your hand or workout rag- and all of this is clogging up your pores with dead skin cells and oil and bacteria. the first key to keeping it to a minimum is to EXFOLIATE regularly- every several days- to keep the dead skin layer to a minimum and cut down on pore clogging potential. next, make sure you have a good facial cleanser and use it day and night- i shudder when guys say they just use body soap on their faces... also, moisturize with good facial moisturizer formulated for oily skin type, so it won't clog pores- staying moisturized will keep the skin from thinking it needs to keep lubricating itself with oil. finally- don't ever touch your face unless you have cleanser, exfoliant, or moisturizer on your hands- every time you do, you're reintroducing bacteria.

    good luck.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jul 03, 2009 1:36 PM GMT
    Try....
    Neutrogena Deep Clean Facial Cleanser. It's mild and cleans very well, without drying

    Neutrogena Alcohol Free Toner, really cleans out the skin without drying effects found in alcohol based products. It also leaves in your skin's natural moisture.

    Then any moisturizer that is OIL-FREE!


    If you need to, you can ask your normal doctor for a prescription of BenzaClin.
    5% Benzoyl Peroxide
    1% Clindamycin

    this clears up skin fast, and only a small amount is needed every night.

    8-10 full glasses of water each day on average

    Take a multivitamin and fish-oil capsules


    This is what I do and my skin is great icon_smile.gif

    and I've been through accutane, and this is working better then accutaneicon_eek.gif
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    Jul 03, 2009 2:03 PM GMT
    joecoolnv saidThanks for the replies.

    I have been going in the dry sauna a lot lately. So, maybe it is the toxins etc. coming out of my pores, then getting clogged.

    JOE

    You're sweat glands are not a second set of kidneys. You arent excreting toxins per se thru your pores. You will flush out sebaceous oils and some heavy metals thru sweating. If the pores become clogged with oils, then bacteria can get down in there and grow, causing an infection. Sweating in the sauna then giving yourself a good scrubbing in the shower afterwards will eventually clean them all out.

    Also, your pores harbor a mite, demodex. Increased warmth, sweat, and oils can get them all riled up and increase their activity. Squeeze a pore, smear it on a slide and take a look under a microscope. They are there.

    demodex.jpg
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    Jul 03, 2009 4:47 PM GMT
    Ewww. I DO need to exfoliate!
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    Jul 04, 2009 6:13 AM GMT
    I dealt with severe acne for 12 years, and the past several years I've experienced occasional break outs.

    The thing that I've found that works best for me is using an organic exfoliating scrub from Aubrey Organics on my face twice a day. I usually moisturize with Loreal for Men's moisturizer afterwards. The combination seems to keep me clear and my skin soft. Diet's also key.

    Depends on the individual I guess.
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    Jul 04, 2009 7:24 AM GMT
    I think one important thing that applies to acne is we all need SLEEP...

    Not having a proper amount of sleep can induce acne which can relate to depression and stress...

    At least eight hours of sleep for adults...

    Sleeping does affect your immune system and your body to heal.. that includes the acne on your skin...

    Have a good night sleep, guys! icon_wink.gif
  • MikemikeMike

    Posts: 6932

    Jul 04, 2009 7:31 AM GMT
    My ex used Brevoxyl-8 get a script and use it. Works great. I don't have acne but a few times a year i'd get one and that stuff cleared it in 2 days.