Oldest known Bible goes online

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    Jul 06, 2009 6:05 PM GMT
    Story Highlights

    Handwritten Codex Sinaiticus is more than 1,600 years old

    Includes two books not part of official New Testament

    Discovered in a monastery in Sinai desert in Egypt more than 160 years ago

    Scholar named Constantine Tischendorf recognized its significance in 1844

    http://www.cnn.com/2009/WORLD/europe/07/06/ancient.bible.online/index.html

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    Jul 06, 2009 10:18 PM GMT
    Caslon11000 saidStory Highlights

    Handwritten Codex Sinaiticus is more than 1,600 years old

    Includes two books not part of official New Testament

    Discovered in a monastery in Sinai desert in Egypt more than 160 years ago

    Scholar named Constantine Tischendorf recognized its significance in 1844

    http://www.cnn.com/2009/WORLD/europe/07/06/ancient.bible.online/index.html



    oh i didn't see this was already posted. i''ll have to delete mine then. just made a double post of this same item
  • BeingThePhoen...

    Posts: 1157

    Jul 06, 2009 10:37 PM GMT
    More proof that the Bible is the most edited and changed work of fiction ever.
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    Jul 06, 2009 10:41 PM GMT
    Here is the link to the manuscript. No english translation is populated yet. Click the manuscript tab and give it a minute to load.

    http://www.codexsinaiticus.org/en/
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    Jul 06, 2009 10:43 PM GMT
    ErikTaurean saidHere is the link to the manuscript. No english translation is populated yet. Click the manuscript tab and give it a minute to load.

    http://www.codexsinaiticus.org/en/


    Yes there are english translations of some parts of it.
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    Jul 06, 2009 10:55 PM GMT
    Yep....and the only parts i was interested in checking out were leviticus 18:22 and 20:13

    but....they're not available or they don't exist.
  • coolarmydude

    Posts: 9190

    Jul 06, 2009 10:58 PM GMT
    Dammnit! I thought you were going to talk about the "Devil's Bible" that was featured last night on the National Geographic Channel. icon_twisted.gif
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    Jul 06, 2009 11:06 PM GMT
    Blackguy4you> just made a double post of this same item

    And now you just double posted it here. Sorry, but that's a pet peeve of mine. Was there really a need to repost all of Caslon's post (thankfully in this instance it was short) in order to add 1 line to it? (Can I shame you into editing your post and taking that out...? (: )


    > Discovered in a monastery in Sinai desert in Egypt more than 160 years ago

    Quibble: was the Sinai part of Egypt in 1844? This would be right after the time of Muhammad Ali's invasion, so maybe, though I thought it was only after the British wanted to protect the Suez Canal that they pushed into the Sinai, ultimately ousting the Ottomans in 1906. I know that in 1861 the border ran from El Arish to Suez, which would put Santa Katarina not in Egypt. But in 1844...? Not sure.

    Here's a picture of the monastery:
    image004.jpg


    Some might be surprised to learn that this codex (or uncial) has been previously discussed here on RJ:
    http://www.realjock.com/gayforums/?searchtext=uncial

    icon_smile.gif

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    Jul 06, 2009 11:08 PM GMT
    txguy1605> the only parts i was interested in checking out were leviticus 18:22 and 20:13

    Try here for Leviticus:
    http://www.mechon-mamre.org/p/pt/pt0318.htm
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    Jul 14, 2009 3:59 PM GMT


    "The three manuscript powerhouses behind the modern Bible are Sinaiticus, Vaticanus and Alexandrinus. Like Sinaiticus, the Vaticanus codex dates to the 4th century, with Alexandrinus transcribed 100 years later. Vaticanus was preserved and overwritten in the 15th century. Alexandrinus may be the best preserved. But only Sinaiticus has the prized complete New Testament. The books' different ordering, contents and appearances again testify to the Bible's evolutionary history."

    http://www.time.com/time/specials/packages/article/0,28804,1910141_1910142_1910136,00.html

    "Erasures, additions, corrections, substitutions — Sinaiticus reveals a Bible-in-process. Between the 4th and 12th centuries, various scribes changed earlier colleagues' bad spelling. Of more theological significance, the Gospel of Mark ends early. Sinaiticus even contains two books that didn't make the later canon cut, the Epistle of Apostle Barnabas and the Shepherd of Hermas. The changes are significant, according to British Library curator Scot McKendrick, because "the recognition is that Scripture, as it comes down to us, is transmitted by human hand." "

    http://www.time.com/time/specials/packages/article/0,28804,1910141_1910142_1910130,00.html

    Originally, the Gospel of Mark ended with the women finding the empty tomb and they were told by the "angel" to tell no one. Finis. But that wouldnt do, so 12 more verses were added and the women went off and told the men.
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    Jul 14, 2009 4:14 PM GMT
    Caesarea4 saidtxguy1605> the only parts i was interested in checking out were leviticus 18:22 and 20:13

    Try here for Leviticus:
    http://www.mechon-mamre.org/p/pt/pt0318.htm



    well i wanted to see those parts IN the oldest bible that was published online.
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    Jul 14, 2009 4:15 PM GMT
    All these ancient manuscripts have been known for quite some time. It is good that people know that their bibles are not one decisive book handed down straight from the executive desks of the authors of the MANY letters and documents that the bible really is. In this previous thread:
    http://www.realjock.com/gayforums/579927/
    the subject of errors and revision is brought up.